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Hollywood Highland Partners

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After vowing to build two mammoth commercial, residential and entertainment complexes without a penny of taxpayer money, developers of the cornerstone projects in the $1-billion Hollywood renewal effort are seeking as much as $140 million in redevelopment subsidies to keep their projects alive, The Times has learned.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After vowing to build two mammoth commercial, residential and entertainment complexes without a penny of taxpayer money, developers of the cornerstone projects in the $1-billion Hollywood renewal effort are seeking as much as $140 million in redevelopment subsidies to keep their projects alive, The Times has learned.
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NEWS
October 20, 1988 | KARL KAHLER, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Bass, the billionaire Texan who recently took over California's American Savings & Loan Assn., is part of a group planning to build a 1.7-million-square-foot urban village in Hollywood. The development, expected to cost up to $200 million, is under study by the Community Redevelopment Agency. The residential and business complex would include apartment buildings, a health club, child-care center, grocery store and other businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers have backed out of a planned $300-million complex of apartments, stores and offices in Hollywood, killing a cornerstone of the massive renewal effort under way in the movie capital, city officials confirmed Monday.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles officials, responding to disclosure of closed-door talks between the city's Community Redevelopment Agency and two developers seeking up to $140 million in subsidies, say they intend to make sure Hollywood's pressing needs are not sacrificed just to save two massive projects.
REAL ESTATE
March 6, 1988 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Caricatures of famous entertainers cover the walls of the new Brown Derby at Hollywood and Vine, and there is also an ink drawing, near one of a young actor named Ronald Reagan, of Marian Gibbons. Marian who? "I told Walter, 'No, I can't be up there. The walls are for movie stars,"' Gibbons recalled, "but one day, when I came in for lunch, an artist drew me while I was eating." And Walter --Walter P.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | DEAN MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The grand vision for a rejuvenated Hollywood first emerged seven years ago during a luncheon for wealthy businessmen at the Brown Derby. By the end of dessert and coffee, broadcaster Bill Welsh had collected thousands of dollars in pledges for the feasibility study that later would qualify the tattered movie capital for an enormous, government-subsidized make-over.
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