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SPORTS
October 19, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the Rams arrived from Cleveland in 1946, Pacific Coast League baseball, college football, boxing and horse racing were the sports staples in Los Angeles. In 1926, Bill Lane moved his Salt Lake City Bees to Los Angeles, and the team became the Hollywood Stars, who in those early days were also called the Sheiks. The Stars shared Wrigley Field with the Hollywood Angels through the 1935 season. Then Lane moved his Stars south to San Diego, where they became the Padres.
SPORTS
October 19, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the Rams arrived from Cleveland in 1946, Pacific Coast League baseball, college football, boxing and horse racing were the sports staples in Los Angeles. In 1926, Bill Lane moved his Salt Lake City Bees to Los Angeles, and the team became the Hollywood Stars, who in those early days were also called the Sheiks. The Stars shared Wrigley Field with the Hollywood Angels through the 1935 season. Then Lane moved his Stars south to San Diego, where they became the Padres.
SPORTS
October 19, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Hollywood's big day in the baseball world was overshadowed by a more gripping event happening in Detroit, somebody forgot to mention it to the folks out here. In Detroit on May 2, 1939, Lou Gehrig missed his first game after 2,130 consecutive appearances with the New York Yankees. But in Hollywood, the significance of Gehrig's iron-man performance was momentarily ignored. These Stars had their own show to put on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sally Cobb, former doyenne of the Brown Derby restaurants who co-wrote a book about their lore, recipes and celebrity diners, has died. She was 83. Cobb, the widow of Brown Derby owner Robert H. Cobb, died Tuesday in Los Angeles, according to her friend and publicist Bee Canterbury Lavery. A prominent John Robert Powers model in the 1930s, the former Sally Fletcher was known as "the Figure."
SPORTS
April 5, 1997 | MAL FLORENCE
Is there anything more boring than watching grass grow? A new Web site is featuring grass--the tended turf of the Oakland Coliseum to be precise. The site boasts a stadium Web Cam that will be operating 24 hours a day. The site's chief attraction will be pregame and postgame activities of Oakland Athletic home games. During games, only the scoreboard will be shown because of Major League Baseball licensing restrictions.
FOOD
November 3, 2004 | Charles Perry
The 70-year-old Farmers Market and the 2 1/2 -year- old Grove stand on part of an old dairy farm, the 256-acre section of Rancho la Brea that Illinois-born A.F. Gilmore bought at auction in 1880. It amounted to half a dozen blocks on either side of what would become Fairfax Avenue between 3rd Street and Beverly Boulevard, plus a few more blocks to the north, which gave it a roughly triangular shape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2001 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could spot Phil Esparza for an oilman anywhere, with his white Texaco hard hat, rubber boots and dusty blue work pants. He talks oil. He enthuses about oil. "There's nothing better than a good hydrocarbon smell," he says. "I love it." At the moment, Esparza is killing the thing he loves. The smell of petroleum is in the air as Esparza works in the midday sun on the property of the Los Angeles Farmers Market, at Fairfax Avenue and 3rd Street.
SPORTS
October 19, 1990 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Hollywood's big day in the baseball world was overshadowed by a more gripping event happening in Detroit, somebody forgot to mention it to the folks out here. In Detroit on May 2, 1939, Lou Gehrig missed his first game after 2,130 consecutive appearances with the New York Yankees. But in Hollywood, the significance of Gehrig's iron-man performance was momentarily ignored. These Stars had their own show to put on.
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