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Holmes And Watson

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Is "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" the ultimate disguise? Have they simply reimagined the legendary sleuth as a sort of grand mash-up of Eddie Izzard and the Terminator, which not only endows him with substantial brain and brawn but some very interesting wardrobe choices? After the box-office success of 2009's "Sherlock Holmes," you knew the filmmakers would be pressed to find a way to up the ante. Nonstop action, a possible world war and cross-dressing are indeed the answer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Is "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" the ultimate disguise? Have they simply reimagined the legendary sleuth as a sort of grand mash-up of Eddie Izzard and the Terminator, which not only endows him with substantial brain and brawn but some very interesting wardrobe choices? After the box-office success of 2009's "Sherlock Holmes," you knew the filmmakers would be pressed to find a way to up the ante. Nonstop action, a possible world war and cross-dressing are indeed the answer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick, Watson, at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before and, in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Eric Pape, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This much is clear: It's 1891, a year after their first adventure, and the great English detective and Dr. Watson are facing off with Professor Moriarty, a mysterious, peripheral character from their initial blockbuster. Ask the creative forces behind "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" for more details on the new Robert Downey Jr. movie, due in theaters Dec. 16, and you'll find tight lips. But the set here, a 40-minute train trip west from London, was rife with clues last winter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first, and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick Watson at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before, and in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2009
"Sherlock Holmes," the latest incarnation of Arthur Conan Doyle's analytical, coke-loving sleuth, opens Christmas Day, starring Robert Downey Jr. as the Baker Street detective and Jude Law as Watson, his cohort in crime-solving. So it's elementary that the game is afoot to pay homage to previous cinematic Holmeses. On Monday at the Billy Wilder Theatre in Westwood, the UCLA Film and Television Archive is screening 1944's "The Scarlet Claw" and "The Spider Woman," which star the most famous celluloid Holmes and Watson: Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Charles Marowitz's original play "Sherlock's Last Case" was one of the domestic highlights of last year's Olympic Arts Festival in a production by the Los Angeles Actors' Theatre. Now Herbert J. Kendall and Gerald Roberts have brought the play into their New Mayfair Theatre, whose post-Victorian appointments (and proscenium stage) create a comfortable atmosphere for this tale of Holmesian intrigue, virtually none of whose details can be revealed without spoiling it some for the viewer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Sherlock Holmes ? you all know that guy. (And if you don't, I would very much like to speak with you; your strange case interests me.) Like Santa Claus or Peter Pan or Hamlet, he is among those ? spoiler alert! ? fictional characters who stand for a whole class of behavior and purpose and who shape the very way we think about thinking. We greet his periodic returns to the screen with excitement, but also with trepidation: As a man out of copyright, he is subject to all sorts of remaking and remodeling and speculation upon his closeted character.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Eric Pape, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This much is clear: It's 1891, a year after their first adventure, and the great English detective and Dr. Watson are facing off with Professor Moriarty, a mysterious, peripheral character from their initial blockbuster. Ask the creative forces behind "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows" for more details on the new Robert Downey Jr. movie, due in theaters Dec. 16, and you'll find tight lips. But the set here, a 40-minute train trip west from London, was rife with clues last winter.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990 | KEITH LOVE
ARROGANT, PRECISE, keen-witted--that was Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes. The movies he and Nigel Bruce (as Dr. Watson) made in the '40s are classics. But did you know they also had a radio show during World War II? These wonderful original radio broadcasts--a great antidote for the commuter blahs--have recently been issued on audio cassette (about $10 each).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick, Watson, at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before and, in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first, and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick Watson at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before, and in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Sherlock Holmes ? you all know that guy. (And if you don't, I would very much like to speak with you; your strange case interests me.) Like Santa Claus or Peter Pan or Hamlet, he is among those ? spoiler alert! ? fictional characters who stand for a whole class of behavior and purpose and who shape the very way we think about thinking. We greet his periodic returns to the screen with excitement, but also with trepidation: As a man out of copyright, he is subject to all sorts of remaking and remodeling and speculation upon his closeted character.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2009
"Sherlock Holmes," the latest incarnation of Arthur Conan Doyle's analytical, coke-loving sleuth, opens Christmas Day, starring Robert Downey Jr. as the Baker Street detective and Jude Law as Watson, his cohort in crime-solving. So it's elementary that the game is afoot to pay homage to previous cinematic Holmeses. On Monday at the Billy Wilder Theatre in Westwood, the UCLA Film and Television Archive is screening 1944's "The Scarlet Claw" and "The Spider Woman," which star the most famous celluloid Holmes and Watson: Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Charles Marowitz's original play "Sherlock's Last Case" was one of the domestic highlights of last year's Olympic Arts Festival in a production by the Los Angeles Actors' Theatre. Now Herbert J. Kendall and Gerald Roberts have brought the play into their New Mayfair Theatre, whose post-Victorian appointments (and proscenium stage) create a comfortable atmosphere for this tale of Holmesian intrigue, virtually none of whose details can be revealed without spoiling it some for the viewer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
A federal judge has ruled that Sherlock Holmes and his sidekick, Dr. John H. Watson, are no longer protected by copyright, and that all elements of the famous sleuth's stories created by the late Sir Arthur Conan Doyle before 1923 are now in the public domain. The court case required U.S. District Judge Rubén Castillo to become something of a Sherlock Holmes expert, and in a 22-page ruling issued last week in Chicago, he began by summarizing the four novels and 56 short stories Conan Doyle wrote about the fictional detective: The character first appeared in 1887.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Austin James (Parker Stevenson) is an eccentric scientist who solves crimes by virtue of his superior intellect. Mickey Castle (Ashley Crow) is his flighty assistant. They are the Holmes and Watson of ABC's new "Probe," which opens as a two-hour movie at 9 tonight (Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42) before settling into its regular 8 p.m. Thursday time slot this week.
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