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Holmes Tuttle

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NEWS
June 17, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Republican fund raiser Holmes Tuttle, who refused to take no for an answer when Ronald Reagan at first declined to run for governor of California in the mid-1960s, died Friday morning at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. He would have been 84 today. His son-in-law, Joseph J. Keon, said Tuttle, who had lived in Montecito for several years, suffered a stroke eight weeks ago. Tuttle succeeded in persuading the reluctant Reagan that he should run for governor in 1966. Reagan won, was elected to a second term and then in 1980, with Tuttle's support, was elected President of the United States.
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NEWS
May 21, 1995
Virginia Harris Tuttle, 87, a co-founder of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Music Center. Mrs. Tuttle, widow of auto dealer and presidential adviser Holmes Tuttle, also was on committees supporting the Hollywood Bowl, Costume Council of Los Angeles and Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles. She and her husband retired in 1988 to Santa Barbara, where she was a volunteer with the Braille Institute, the Music Academy of the West and the Santa Barbara Cancer Foundation.
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NEWS
May 21, 1995
Virginia Harris Tuttle, 87, a co-founder of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Music Center. Mrs. Tuttle, widow of auto dealer and presidential adviser Holmes Tuttle, also was on committees supporting the Hollywood Bowl, Costume Council of Los Angeles and Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles. She and her husband retired in 1988 to Santa Barbara, where she was a volunteer with the Braille Institute, the Music Academy of the West and the Santa Barbara Cancer Foundation.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Republican fund raiser Holmes Tuttle, who refused to take no for an answer when Ronald Reagan at first declined to run for governor of California in the mid-1960s, died Friday morning at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. He would have been 84 today. His son-in-law, Joseph J. Keon, said Tuttle, who had lived in Montecito for several years, suffered a stroke eight weeks ago. Tuttle succeeded in persuading the reluctant Reagan that he should run for governor in 1966. Reagan won, was elected to a second term and then in 1980, with Tuttle's support, was elected President of the United States.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | From Associated Press
Businessmen Holmes Tuttle and Earle M. Jorgensen are among the 20 or so wealthy friends of President and Mrs. Reagan who chipped in at least $156,000 apiece to buy them a Los Angeles estate, according to documents released Tuesday in Washington. The documents include a 1986 opinion from the Office of Government Ethics that concludes that even if the group of businessmen decided to give the $2.
REAL ESTATE
February 1, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's friends got a deal on the Bel-Air house they reportedly bought with the President's retirement in mind. Under the name "Wall Management Services Inc.," the group--which includes the President's longtime associates Holmes Tuttle and Earl Jorgenson--bought the 7,192-square-foot house with three bedrooms and six baths on 1 acres for $2.5 million. The dirt alone on a 1-acre lot in that neighborhood is worth an estimated $3 million!
NEWS
April 13, 1988
Businessmen Holmes Tuttle and Earle M. Jorgensen are among the 20 or so wealthy friends of President and Mrs. Reagan who chipped in at least $156,000 apiece to buy them a Los Angeles estate, according to documents released Tuesday in Washington. The documents include a 1986 opinion from the Office of Government Ethics that concludes that even if the group of businessmen decided to give the $2.
NEWS
January 24, 1987 | From United Press International
Friends have purchased a $2.5-million retirement home for President Reagan and the First Lady in the exclusive Bel-Air section of Los Angeles, Cable News Network reported Friday night. White House and sources in Los Angeles said that nearly 20 friends set up a company called Wall Management Services Inc. to purchase the home on a 1-acre secluded lot. They bought the estate last Aug. 21 with the understanding they would be reimbursed later by the Reagans, whose money is in a blind trust.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward "Ed" Mills, former president of the historic Van de Kamp Bakeries and a California Republican Party finance chairman who was one of the original key supporters and advisors of Ronald Reagan, has died. He was 94. Mills died Sunday at his home in Irvine Cove in Laguna Beach, his daughter, Marianne Spielmann of Pasadena, said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1986 | JERRY COHEN, Times Staff Writer
Charles E. Cook, one of President Reagan's early political supporters and chairman of the board and co-founder of the Community Bank, has died Cook, who co-founded the bank more than 40 years ago with his late brother Howard, also an early Reagan supporter, died Thursday at Huntington Memorial Hospital after a lengthy illness. Private services were held Saturday at his Pasadena home.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | From Associated Press
Businessmen Holmes Tuttle and Earle M. Jorgensen are among the 20 or so wealthy friends of President and Mrs. Reagan who chipped in at least $156,000 apiece to buy them a Los Angeles estate, according to documents released Tuesday in Washington. The documents include a 1986 opinion from the Office of Government Ethics that concludes that even if the group of businessmen decided to give the $2.
REAL ESTATE
February 1, 1987 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's friends got a deal on the Bel-Air house they reportedly bought with the President's retirement in mind. Under the name "Wall Management Services Inc.," the group--which includes the President's longtime associates Holmes Tuttle and Earl Jorgenson--bought the 7,192-square-foot house with three bedrooms and six baths on 1 acres for $2.5 million. The dirt alone on a 1-acre lot in that neighborhood is worth an estimated $3 million!
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2004 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
Bradford Freeman is an old friend of President Bush and one of a handful described as a member of his inner circle. Freeman is also Bush's California fundraising leader, and he loves to tell the story of how the president-elect called him with what Freeman hoped would be a prestigious appointment as an ambassador or maybe a secret agent. The kind of reward that, in the realpolitik of campaign finance, a rainmaker like Freeman might realistically anticipate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2000 | JOHN MERONEY, John Meroney is an associate editor of the American Enterprise magazine
"You're not going to believe this," said George, bartender here at the Bel-Air Hotel for more than 40 years. And at first I didn't. But ever since New Hampshire, nestled in this oasis of refined elegance in the winding streets off Sunset Boulevard, late at night when everyone else has gone home, the ghosts of Ronald Reagan's "kitchen cabinet" meet here for cigars and martinis.
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