Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHoly Water
IN THE NEWS

Holy Water

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | COLLEEN SLEVIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
The planters at the grotto at the Mother Cabrini Shrine have no flowers, just dirt. The nuns are limited to seven-minute showers. They go to a coin laundry to clean their linens. And the shrine's main spring -- considered holy by the faithful, who believe that its water can heal -- is being supplemented with city water brought in by truck. Because of the worst drought in a century, conserving water has become common throughout the West. But at the shrine, it takes on a loftier purpose.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 28, 2007
GOV. ARNOLD Schwarzenegger likes to grumble that the battle over how to store California's scarce water supply for a non-rainy day is tantamount to a "holy war." Year after year, Republicans and farmers push for new dams and reservoirs, while Democrats and environmentalists call for increased underground storage and conservation. Middle ground is as easy to find as a diving hole in the lower Owens Valley.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
April 8, 2007 | Margaret Ramirez and Emma Graves Fitzsimmons, Chicago Tribune
The archbishop of Chicago, Cardinal Francis George, was hospitalized with a slight hip fracture Saturday morning after he apparently slipped and fell inside a church while blessing Easter baskets, archdiocese officials said. George, 70, was at St. Ferdinand Roman Catholic Church to bless baskets of food for Easter meals when he slipped on some holy water that had splashed onto the marble floor, said Colleen Dolan, a spokeswoman for the archdiocese.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2007 | Margaret Ramirez and Emma Graves Fitzsimmons, Chicago Tribune
The archbishop of Chicago, Cardinal Francis George, was hospitalized with a slight hip fracture Saturday morning after he apparently slipped and fell inside a church while blessing Easter baskets, archdiocese officials said. George, 70, was at St. Ferdinand Roman Catholic Church to bless baskets of food for Easter meals when he slipped on some holy water that had splashed onto the marble floor, said Colleen Dolan, a spokeswoman for the archdiocese.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | AJAY SINGH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For centuries, Hindus have called it the nectar of God, believing that just a drop brings salvation. Now it comes as a new vintage for water goblets: water from the Ganges River. Two Indian businessmen have built a plant high in the Himalayas to bottle Ganges water for sale in India and abroad. And they're unfazed at the prospect of competing with better-known mineral waters. "This is something much more superior," said Ved Prakash Gupta, one of the partners in the venture.
OPINION
April 28, 2007
GOV. ARNOLD Schwarzenegger likes to grumble that the battle over how to store California's scarce water supply for a non-rainy day is tantamount to a "holy war." Year after year, Republicans and farmers push for new dams and reservoirs, while Democrats and environmentalists call for increased underground storage and conservation. Middle ground is as easy to find as a diving hole in the lower Owens Valley.
SPORTS
September 19, 1991 | CHRIS FOSTER
Santa Ana Valley's 28-0 football loss to Corona was not exactly the debut Coach Scott Strosnider was hoping to have. "I got baptized Friday night. But instead of holy water, they used muddy water," Strosnider said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | Elaine Gale
The ancient tradition of immersing believers in water to mark their acceptance of faith cuts across denominational lines. Locales, however, vary from ocean or river baptisms to formal rituals in churches. Whether with consecrated holy water from fonts or saltwater from pools off Orange County, baptismal fluids symbolize a rebirth into a new life of faith. In many faiths, infants are baptized in a first rite of passage, such as the ceremonies at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1995 | JEFF McDONALD
A steady drizzle did little to quell the enthusiasm of more than 100 Greek Orthodox worshipers, who in Ventura on Sunday celebrated a centuries-old tradition commemorating the baptism of Jesus Christ. Parishioners of the St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in Camarillo spent the morning in church services. But in the afternoon, they gathered along the marina's edge as Father Cyril Loeb blessed the water and tossed a wooden cross into the Ventura Harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2006 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
Bishop of Orange Tod D. Brown is scheduled to be in Costa Mesa today to sprinkle holy water on a brick building, anoint its walls with oil and accept the keys to its bronze double doors. It will be a moment 48 years in the making. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church on Baker Street will then become home to a parish that has been meeting in temporary quarters since Dwight D. Eisenhower was president.
BOOKS
August 21, 2005 | Nathaniel Rich, Nathaniel Rich, an editor at the Paris Review, is the author of "San Francisco Noir."
EVERY August, tens of thousands of northern Italians head south to the paradisiacal Mediterranean beaches of southern Italy, to the Amalfi Coast, to Capri, Sicily and Sardinia, where they enjoy several weeks of idleness and a way of life that soldiers on at an even slower pace than the rest of Italy. Forget afternoon siestas -- to many tourists these southern regions seem adrift in a perpetual nap that has lasted for more than 25 centuries.
NEWS
September 22, 2002 | COLLEEN SLEVIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
The planters at the grotto at the Mother Cabrini Shrine have no flowers, just dirt. The nuns are limited to seven-minute showers. They go to a coin laundry to clean their linens. And the shrine's main spring -- considered holy by the faithful, who believe that its water can heal -- is being supplemented with city water brought in by truck. Because of the worst drought in a century, conserving water has become common throughout the West. But at the shrine, it takes on a loftier purpose.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an Easter Vigil service last week at St. Maximilian Kolbe Catholic Church in Westlake Village, 30 converts sat in a pool of water and lay back under the surface. One at a time, their brown robes floating about them, they were blessed by the pastor, who baptized them "in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit." Many of the friends and family members who crowded around the 10-foot-wide baptismal pool said they had never before seen a Catholic baptism by immersion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2001 | DOUG SMITH and JENNIFER OLDHAM, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles International Airport, Southern California's universal crossroads, still trembles in the shadow of Sept. 11. Flights have been canceled, commerce squelched, jobs slashed, terrorist scares endured. And individuals have faced their fears--of flying and of forces they cannot control. Three months into this new era, equilibrium emerges for a day or two at the giant airport, then dissolves again. Spilled nondairy creamer can still close down a terminal for hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2001 | Elaine Gale
The ancient tradition of immersing believers in water to mark their acceptance of faith cuts across denominational lines. Locales, however, vary from ocean or river baptisms to formal rituals in churches. Whether with consecrated holy water from fonts or saltwater from pools off Orange County, baptismal fluids symbolize a rebirth into a new life of faith. In many faiths, infants are baptized in a first rite of passage, such as the ceremonies at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997
As eighth-grader Jennifer Sherman read verses Tuesday morning relating the biblical account of creation, creatures great and small barked, squawked and wriggled on the quadrangle at Chaminade College Preparatory Middle School. The menagerie of pets, including a rat named Al and a parrot named Sadie, along with their owners and about 600 students gathered for the Catholic school's annual Blessing of the Animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1991 | RICHARD CROMELIN
*** 1/2 SOUNDGARDEN "Badmotorfinger" A&M Soundgarden's inevitable climb to primacy in the new-metal realm continues right on schedule with its second major-label album. In this visceral, wide-ranging panorama, the heavy stomp competes with an impulse to soar, stretching the musical architecture into taut, fanciful shapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997
As eighth-grader Jennifer Sherman read verses Tuesday morning relating the biblical account of creation, creatures great and small barked, squawked and wriggled on the quadrangle at Chaminade College Preparatory Middle School. The menagerie of pets, including a rat named Al and a parrot named Sadie, along with their owners and about 600 students gathered for the Catholic school's annual Blessing of the Animals.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | LAURA GALLOWAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's nearing midnight and a guy named Dave is impatiently waiting to be served at the counter of the Grounds Zero cafe on Sunset Boulevard. "I have to do my taxes," he explains "It's a four-Turbo-Coke night." For the caffeine-deprived, the "Turbo Coke"--a surprisingly tasty combination of Coca-Cola and espresso--is a holy water of sorts. Formerly Babba Cool's, Grounds Zero is almost as quirky as the Turbo Coke itself. Tucked next to a tattoo parlor and one of the most infamous head shops in Los Angeles, first-time visitors are apt to wonder if they've accidentally stepped into someone's basement rec room instead of a cutting-edge cafe.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|