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Home Based Business

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BUSINESS
May 16, 1998 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-based business owners in Los Angeles will not have to register and pay a $25 fee, the City Council decided Friday. But they still will be required to pay city taxes. The change, which will take effect in about 30 days, is the latest tinkering with the controversial ordinance. Since legalization of Los Angeles home-based businesses in March 1997, two lawsuits have been filed against it and state legislation proposed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck, Los Angeles Times
When Caron Ory's father was diagnosed with diabetes and struggled to stop eating sugar, the trained dietitian told him not to worry. "I'll create something for you," she promised. Through two years of research, trial-and-error recipes and taste tests, Ory came up with Eco-BeeCo, a natural sugar alternative with a tad of freeze-dried honey that passed her requirements nutritionally and her father's gustatory muster. But when Ory wanted to share her product outside of family and friends, she ran into a hurdle.
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BUSINESS
April 17, 1997 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Besieged by calls from angry business owners, Los Angeles city officials Wednesday said they were considering dumping a requirement that newly licensed home-based businesses pay up to three years' back taxes. Councilwoman Laura Chick, who spearheaded the effort to legalize home-based businesses in November, has drafted a motion that would exempt home-office owners from part of the city's business licensing rules through Sept. 5.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Shades of Mildred Pierce may be cropping up throughout the state as lawmakers are set to decide whether mothers and others are allowed to sell homemade muffins, cakes and pies at local stores and restaurants and directly to consumers. Slammed by the economy, many households are looking to follow in the footsteps of the fictional heroine by earning a bit of money on the side with home-cooked confections - without the huge upfront costs in leasing certified commercial kitchens and complying with myriad business rules.
REAL ESTATE
July 23, 2006 | H. May Spitz, Special to The Times
Question: I want to start a business at home, but my landlord refuses even to listen to my request. Why would he care? How can I change his mind? Answer: Since there are hundreds of home-based business possibilities, the landlord may be wary of what yours might bring, including outside visitors, noise, parking problems and stress to neighbors. Other concerns might include insurance claims, increased costs for utilities, fire and safety issues and that the business violates the law. Why the fuss?
BUSINESS
April 18, 1997 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cynthia Loy Darst expected to become a legal city business by handing over a check for $1,000 in back taxes during a ceremony Thursday in her North Hollywood backyard. Instead, Loy Darst only had to fork over $131.43. The unexpected tax break came about after city officials, berated by angry business owners, changed their position on the city's controversial new home-based business registration.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1998 | VICKI TORRES
The battle to exempt home-based businesses from city registration fees and taxes has spread to the California Legislature. Assembly Bill 2065, introduced recently by Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), would prohibit cities from requiring permits, licenses or taxes from any person working at home whose business does not affect the neighborhood.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1998 | VICKI TORRES
Fourteen years ago, when small-business authors Paul and Sarah Edwards were writing the first of their eight books on home-based businesses, not one temporary employment agency would send secretarial help to their Sierra Madre house to work on the manuscript stored in their computer. Every temp agency they called told them that temporary workers were sent only to offices and factories in commercial districts, not to people's homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eager to forestall further lawsuits by writers who are angry over new city laws that would force them to pay city fees and taxes to work at home, the chairman of the City Council's Budget and Finance Committee proposed Tuesday that the statute be amended. Councilman Richard Alatorre told his committee that Los Angeles' home occupation and business tax laws should specifically exempt writers and others who work out of their homes without any impact on their neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1996 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Fernando Valley composer takes pains to ensure there is no audible evidence that he's breaking the law. His neighbors, he says, are none the wiser that he is illegally operating a business in their midst, thanks to the soundproofing his backyard recording studio has undergone. He's a one-man band in his state-of-the-art studio stocked with $100,000 worth of digital equipment, synthesizers, samplers and a Macintosh computer. But he's not one of a kind.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2010 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen : My home-based business sells $25,000 annually. My clients want credit card payment options, but is that financially viable? Answer: Here's the real question: Can you afford to lose current and prospective clients because you don't accept credit cards? Fees, which will probably run 2% to 4% per transaction, can be built into your pricing structure, says Paul Nisenbaum, a credit card consultant with PaymentMaven.com. "Setting up your business to receive online credit card transactions will involve some initial paperwork, but once your system is in place, it is not complicated for you or your clients," Nisenbaum said.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2008 | Karen E. Klein, Special to The Times
Dear Karen: I read your recent column about business valuation calculators. Are the online calculators useful? Answer: Determining the market value of a small company is both art and science, said Steve Garber of FTI Consulting. "A well-developed online business valuation calculator can properly model the science piece of the valuation puzzle but cannot properly incorporate the art -- or human judgment and experience -- part of the analysis," he said. An online calculator can provide a ballpark figure for internal use. But plugging numbers into a formula will not capture the full value of a company, Garber said.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2008 | Cyndia Zwahlen, Special to The Times
Scrawled across the corner of her bathroom mirror are the words entrepreneur Sheri Varela tries to live by: "Do what you love." That message helped inspire her to launch a T-shirt business last month that sells tops for women decorated with messages such as "Breathe" and "Attitude Matters." Money has been tight for the home-based business, Sheri Baby Inc. So when Varela heard about a free legal service for small businesses offered by USC, she snapped up a spot. "I needed to get some assistance so I could protect my company as best as possible," said the Valencia resident, a former mortgage broker and onetime teacher.
REAL ESTATE
July 23, 2006 | H. May Spitz, Special to The Times
Question: I want to start a business at home, but my landlord refuses even to listen to my request. Why would he care? How can I change his mind? Answer: Since there are hundreds of home-based business possibilities, the landlord may be wary of what yours might bring, including outside visitors, noise, parking problems and stress to neighbors. Other concerns might include insurance claims, increased costs for utilities, fire and safety issues and that the business violates the law. Why the fuss?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Neighbors in this Kern County community are rallying against a neighbor who wants to house show-business orangutans at his house. Abe Karajerjian is seeking a conditional use permit to allow seven orangutans used in the film industry to be kept in Ridgecrest. He is a zoologist and biological anthropologist and has worked as an animal trainer for 14 years. Neighbors fear a repeat of an attack last year, when two chimpanzees got out of their cage at a Havilah, Calif., ranch and mauled a man.
TRAVEL
October 17, 2004
Regarding "Smart Travelers Save by Following the News" [On a Budget, Sept. 26]: As a member of the National Assn. of Commissioned Travel Agents, an organization of more than 2,500-plus home-based travel agents, I am offended by Arthur Frommer's negative portrayal of home-based agents. Close to, if not 100%, of the association's members are accredited agents. Many of us had "brick and mortar" agencies until the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists attacks, which impacted our industry, and many of us opened home-based offices as a result.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1997 | VICKI TORRES
Six months after Los Angeles officials legalized home-based businesses and urged thousands of small firms to get permits, they have suddenly reversed course. Now, those same companies may not need to get a permit after all. Home-based businesses that have zero impact on their neighborhoods don't have to get a $25 home-occupation permit, City Atty. James K. Hahn said in a memo Friday.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1998 | Vicki Torres
A state bill that would have exempted home-based writers, musicians and artists from paying city business taxes was set aside for more study, effectively killing it this legislative year. But Assembly Bill 2065 could be reintroduced as early as December, said an aide to Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), who introduced the measure for the Writers Guild.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2003 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Hiring workers, storing equipment and selling products on-site would be easier for home-based businesses under recommendations endorsed by the Thousand Oaks Planning Commission. After more than two hours of public comments during a hearing earlier this week, the commission voted to send a series of municipal code changes to the City Council for approval. "We tried to be friendly to small businesses ...
BUSINESS
March 2, 2003 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Janna Smith has been working from her La Canada Flintridge home for 10 years without ever attempting to claim a tax write-off for her office. But that may be about to change. Homes, long a source of lucrative deductions, could prove to be even more valuable tax shelters this year.
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