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Home Based Businesses

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BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | Vicki Torres
An Assembly bill to exempt home-based businesses statewide from city fees and taxes was approved by the Assembly Local Government Committee. The full Assembly could vote on the bill as early as Monday. The measure then goes to the state Senate. Sponsored by Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), AB 2065 would exempt any business or individual who has no more than two deliveries a day, not more than one employee, not more than one client visit per hour and no public advertising.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2013 | By Jeremiah Dobruck, Los Angeles Times
When Caron Ory's father was diagnosed with diabetes and struggled to stop eating sugar, the trained dietitian told him not to worry. "I'll create something for you," she promised. Through two years of research, trial-and-error recipes and taste tests, Ory came up with Eco-BeeCo, a natural sugar alternative with a tad of freeze-dried honey that passed her requirements nutritionally and her father's gustatory muster. But when Ory wanted to share her product outside of family and friends, she ran into a hurdle.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 1997 | VICKI TORRES
Six months after Los Angeles officials legalized home-based businesses and urged thousands of small firms to get permits, they have suddenly reversed course. Now, those same companies may not need to get a permit after all. Home-based businesses that have zero impact on their neighborhoods don't have to get a $25 home-occupation permit, City Atty. James K. Hahn said in a memo Friday.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Shades of Mildred Pierce may be cropping up throughout the state as lawmakers are set to decide whether mothers and others are allowed to sell homemade muffins, cakes and pies at local stores and restaurants and directly to consumers. Slammed by the economy, many households are looking to follow in the footsteps of the fictional heroine by earning a bit of money on the side with home-cooked confections - without the huge upfront costs in leasing certified commercial kitchens and complying with myriad business rules.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1998 | Vicki Torres
A state bill that would have exempted home-based writers, musicians and artists from paying city business taxes was set aside for more study, effectively killing it this legislative year. But Assembly Bill 2065 could be reintroduced as early as December, said an aide to Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), who introduced the measure for the Writers Guild.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994
The city has moved a step closer to allowing businesses to operate in residential areas, with a panel voting unanimously this week to legalize more than two dozen home-based occupations. The vote by the city's Planning Commission came nearly 10 years after officials began to study whether to change zoning codes that prohibit commercial operations in residential neighborhoods. Only doctors, dentists and ministers are allowed to conduct business in their homes.
NEWS
July 11, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a decade of debate, the Los Angeles City Council moved Wednesday to regulate and license a large part of the city's underground economy by voting to draft an ordinance permitting businesses to operate out of residential homes. The vote, on an issue that has been discussed at City Hall for 11 years, brings Los Angeles in line with 77 other cities in the county that have already legalized home-based businesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Home-based businesses are booming, what with the economy bottoming out, and many have used the computer to get a start. But Jaimee Rupe found her inspiration in an 11-year-old pony named Cinnamon Girl. Three years ago, Jaimee and her husband, Jeffrey, moved with their son Ricky, now 5, to a chaparral-covered lot on Old Topanga Road. They spent six months clearing the rented land, bringing in a trailer and building an addition with a Jacuzzi.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1998 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-based business owners in Los Angeles will not have to register and pay a $25 fee, the City Council decided Friday. But they still will be required to pay city taxes. The change, which will take effect in about 30 days, is the latest tinkering with the controversial ordinance. Since legalization of Los Angeles home-based businesses in March 1997, two lawsuits have been filed against it and state legislation proposed.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1997 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Besieged by calls from angry business owners, Los Angeles city officials Wednesday said they were considering dumping a requirement that newly licensed home-based businesses pay up to three years' back taxes. Councilwoman Laura Chick, who spearheaded the effort to legalize home-based businesses in November, has drafted a motion that would exempt home-office owners from part of the city's business licensing rules through Sept. 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Can a $70 business loan change the life of someone long entrenched in poverty with little education and less hope? And would that loan ever be repaid? Remarkably, that is exactly what you see in Holly Mosher's affecting "Bonsai People: The Vision of Muhammad Yunus," her yearlong examination of the Nobel Peace Prize winner's microcredit theories put into practice in his homeland of Bangladesh. The documentary filmmaker, whose work tends to focus on social and environmental issues ("Vanishing of the Bees")
BUSINESS
June 6, 2011 | By Karen E. Klein
Dear Karen: My kids are signed up for day camps this summer. How else can I keep them busy while working at home? Answer: Summer schedules often lower productivity for self-employed parents. Abbey Fatica, president of Living Your Moment — a Columbus, Ohio, marketing firm specializing in home-based businesses — offered some tips: Explain to your children that you need an uninterrupted block of time to work each day. Line up activities for them, such as crafts or play dates, or get a babysitter during that time.
REAL ESTATE
July 23, 2006 | H. May Spitz, Special to The Times
Question: I want to start a business at home, but my landlord refuses even to listen to my request. Why would he care? How can I change his mind? Answer: Since there are hundreds of home-based business possibilities, the landlord may be wary of what yours might bring, including outside visitors, noise, parking problems and stress to neighbors. Other concerns might include insurance claims, increased costs for utilities, fire and safety issues and that the business violates the law. Why the fuss?
TRAVEL
October 17, 2004
Regarding "Smart Travelers Save by Following the News" [On a Budget, Sept. 26]: As a member of the National Assn. of Commissioned Travel Agents, an organization of more than 2,500-plus home-based travel agents, I am offended by Arthur Frommer's negative portrayal of home-based agents. Close to, if not 100%, of the association's members are accredited agents. Many of us had "brick and mortar" agencies until the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists attacks, which impacted our industry, and many of us opened home-based offices as a result.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1998 | Vicki Torres
A state bill that would have exempted home-based writers, musicians and artists from paying city business taxes was set aside for more study, effectively killing it this legislative year. But Assembly Bill 2065 could be reintroduced as early as December, said an aide to Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), who introduced the measure for the Writers Guild.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1998 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home-based business owners in Los Angeles will not have to register and pay a $25 fee, the City Council decided Friday. But they still will be required to pay city taxes. The change, which will take effect in about 30 days, is the latest tinkering with the controversial ordinance. Since legalization of Los Angeles home-based businesses in March 1997, two lawsuits have been filed against it and state legislation proposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like generations of screenwriters before him, Shone Kirkpatrick's work reality runs counter to his profession's poolside-lounging, cell phone-abusing image. He labors mostly alone, in the comfortable but utilitarian study within his West Toluca Lake home. His work brings no visitors to his quiet neighborhood, creates no parking nuisance or fire hazard, and Kirkpatrick frankly sees no reason to start paying city business taxes.
NEWS
February 17, 1994
Citing disruptions caused by the earthquake, Assemblywoman Debra Bowen (D-Marina del Rey) is pushing legislation that would allow home-based businesses to be licensed in Los Angeles County. The effort is aimed primarily at the city of Los Angeles, which does not issue business licenses to people who want to work out of their homes. Bowen spokesman Evan Goldberg said the proposed law would not affect 77 of the county's 88 cities, which already permit some types of home-based businesses.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1998 | Vicki Torres
An Assembly bill to exempt home-based businesses statewide from city fees and taxes was approved by the Assembly Local Government Committee. The full Assembly could vote on the bill as early as Monday. The measure then goes to the state Senate. Sponsored by Assemblyman Tony Cardenas (D-Sylmar), AB 2065 would exempt any business or individual who has no more than two deliveries a day, not more than one employee, not more than one client visit per hour and no public advertising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1998 | DEBRA CANO
Mayor Rich Freschi wants people who run businesses from their homes to ante up. Freschi said the city requires a $50 license for home-based businesses, but not everyone is paying. There are about 120 residential business licenses, Freschi said. But he estimates that the number of home-based enterprises is closer to 200. Home-based businesses pay a license fee the first year of operation. In subsequent years they pay based on gross receipts.
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