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NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - As many as half of Guantanamo Bay's 158 detainees could be transferred from the U.S. prison to their home countries under a provision in the annual National Defense Authorization Act, which Congress was expected to approve late Thursday. Human Rights First, a civil rights advocacy group, called the law "a significant step forward" in opening the jail doors for scores of detainees and perhaps someday closing the facility at the U.S. naval station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 14, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Until about three years ago, federal agents annually intercepted some 8,000 unaccompanied minors entering the United States illegally. By last year, the number had jumped to nearly 26,000. This year's projection: As many as 60,000 youngsters may attempt to cross into this country without parents or papers. This surge of under-age humanity presents two problems. First is understanding the forces propelling it, which experts say include narco-trafficking, Central American gang violence and abusive homes.
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WORLD
December 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A Pentagon-directed review process cleared 46 detainees at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, this year for transfer to authorities in their home countries. They were among 330 detainees who underwent a second round of annual Administrative Review Board hearings. A Pentagon website indicated decisions had been made on at least 211 cases in 2006. Officials ruled that no detainees should be released, the 46 should be transferred and 165 should remain at Guantanamo.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
KAILUA, Hawaii - President Obama praised Congress on Thursday for making it easier to transfer Guantanamo detainees to other countries, but noted that lawmakers' actions fell short of the flexibility he needs to close the prison. Obama cited his repeated requests to Congress for cooperation in closing the detention center at the U.S. naval station in Cuba, which he has vowed to do since his first presidential campaign. "The continued operation of the facility weakens our national security by draining resources, damaging our relationships with key allies and partners, and emboldening violent extremists," the president said in a statement from Hawaii, where he is spending his Christmas vacation, after he signed the National Defense Authorization Act for the 2014 fiscal year.
OPINION
December 10, 2003
Re "Activists Walk 4 Days for Right to Drive," Dec. 8: So Pedro Tobar had his car taken away three times in three years. Was this due to his being unlicensed or was he driving in such a manner so as to attract the attention of a police officer? And if he drove this recklessly when he was fearful of being caught, will he improve after getting a license? Kathryn Roush Granada Hills I'm having difficulty equating "illegal immigrant" with the right to drive. "Illegal immigrant" means being here without proper permission; ergo, they should not be here, and there is no right to drive.
OPINION
February 9, 2007
Re "Do the crime, go home," editorial, Feb. 6 In your editorial supporting the practice of investigating the residency status of Los Angeles County jail inmates, you state, "There should be a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, but convicts have forfeited the right to be on it. Send them home." So, by your reasoning, a criminal who commits a penal code violation and is caught should be deported. However, a criminal who successfully violates federal immigration laws and avoids detection should be rewarded with an opportunity at citizenship.
OPINION
July 1, 2004
Re "When Deportation Is a Death Sentence," Commentary, June 28: Tom Hayden must be joking. I consider myself somewhat liberal, definitely left of center. Yet I was incredulous at Hayden's suggestion that our country should not deport criminal aliens back to Honduras or other Central American nations because it is destabilizing to their native countries and/or may result in physical danger to the deportees. If these immigrants' gangland cultures are wreaking such havoc in their native lands, I shudder to think of the havoc these same gangsters have caused throughout Southern California.
OPINION
April 4, 2008
Re "Divided by death and the border," Column One, April 2 Thank you for the heartbreaking story about the death of Alberta Trujillo and her newborn baby. My heart goes out to her fiance, Margarito Garcia, and her entire family, both here and in Mexico. I have a dear friend, an illegal immigrant, who works harder and longer than many Americans. The vast majority of people who come here from Mexico and Latin America are not criminals. They only wish to find work that is not available in their home countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1994
According to your Dec. 20 editorial, 41% of the 810,635 legal immigrants in 1992, or 332,361 people, decided California was the place they ought to be. The Times then deduced that all 332,361 new arrivals landed on public relief: "It is both unfair and unwise to ask California taxpayers to pick up the tab for this." Not a Beverly Hillbilly among 'em. Are you willing to state explicitly, and do you have the numbers to back it up, that not a single one of those immigrants became contributors to the tax base that so ill-supports California's schools, libraries and public hospitals?
OPINION
October 20, 2003
Re "Lift Shadow From Illegal Immigrants," by Tamar Jacoby, Commentary, Oct. 15: These people are not hiding in the shadows; they are riding in buses to Washington, D.C., in a mistaken analogy to the civil rights movement of the '60s. I don't know whom Jacoby has been listening to, but those whom I speak with have been discussing the problem of illegal immigration for 20 years, not three. Amnesty and "regulated guest-worker programs" don't work -- they've been tried before. All they do is encourage more illegal immigration.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - As many as half of Guantanamo Bay's 158 detainees could be transferred from the U.S. prison to their home countries under a provision in the annual National Defense Authorization Act, which Congress was expected to approve late Thursday. Human Rights First, a civil rights advocacy group, called the law "a significant step forward" in opening the jail doors for scores of detainees and perhaps someday closing the facility at the U.S. naval station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2012 | By J. Michael Kennedy, Special to the Los Angeles Times
ISTANBUL, Turkey - The Turks have a blockbuster on their hands. It's called "Fetih 1453," as in the year the Turks conquered the Byzantine capital of Constantinople - now the sprawling city of Istanbul. This epic, with 16,000 extras, sword fights, tons of blood and turbans galore, has broken all film records in Turkey, not only in how much it cost to make ($17 million) - but also the box office take, more than double the investment and counting. Millions have seen the film since it opened in February - the premiere of which was an afternoon matinee that began at 14:53 p.m. in theaters around the country (the film opened Friday in Los Angeles)
NATIONAL
May 18, 2011 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
The Department of Homeland Security's Office of Inspector General plans an investigation of an immigration enforcement program that purports to target "serious convicted felons" for deportation but has ensnared many illegal immigrants who were arrested but not subsequently convicted of crimes or who committed minor offenses, a letter obtained Wednesday shows. The letter from acting Inspector General Charles K. Edwards to Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-San Jose), who requested an investigation late last month, said the watchdog agency had already scheduled a review of the program, known as Secure Communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Rumors are swirling that a plea deal may be reached in the case of a young terrorism suspect, perhaps sparing the United States from becoming the first nation to try a former child soldier on war crimes charges. Omar Ahmed Khadr of Canada was 15 when he was captured in Afghanistan in the company of hardened Al Qaeda fighters with whom his militant father had apprenticed him in 2002. His trial, on charges that include the murder of a U.S. Army special forces soldier, is set to resume Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Dustin Roasa, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On a muggy evening last week, a crowd of thousands gathered around a temporary outdoor stage in this city's Cambodian Vietnamese Friendship Park. As with most nights, the manicured grounds had a carnival atmosphere, with mobile vendors selling sweets wrapped in banana leaves, and rows of middle-age women stepping their way through aerobics routines during the respite from the blazing sun. But this night was different, because the Los Angeles band Dengue Fever, which takes its inspiration from Cambodian rock music of the 1960s, was scheduled to perform a free show.
WORLD
December 23, 2009 | By Kevin Baxter
When Raul Mondesi left baseball after 13 seasons as a major league outfielder, he returned to his dusty, overcrowded and impoverished hometown determined to make a difference. And both of the Dominican Republic's main political parties were only too happy to assist, with one helping him twice win election to the country's national Chamber of Deputies and another luring him away to run for mayor of the country's sixth-largest city. That's made the former Dodger and 1994 National League Rookie of the Year something of a rising electoral star here, though for reasons that have little to do with his politics.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
KAILUA, Hawaii - President Obama praised Congress on Thursday for making it easier to transfer Guantanamo detainees to other countries, but noted that lawmakers' actions fell short of the flexibility he needs to close the prison. Obama cited his repeated requests to Congress for cooperation in closing the detention center at the U.S. naval station in Cuba, which he has vowed to do since his first presidential campaign. "The continued operation of the facility weakens our national security by draining resources, damaging our relationships with key allies and partners, and emboldening violent extremists," the president said in a statement from Hawaii, where he is spending his Christmas vacation, after he signed the National Defense Authorization Act for the 2014 fiscal year.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | Vanessa Bauza, Chicago Tribune
Swadesh Jain used to travel New Delhi's streets perched on the back of a rickshaw, visiting relatives, perusing shops and taking in the latest Bollywood movies. When her only son and his family moved to Naperville, Jain came too, trading her balmy homeland for the snowy suburbs and a life where everyone's schedule is jampacked -- except hers. Jain's son, Himanshu, a technology consultant, shuttles to San Francisco for work several days a week. Her daughter-in-law, Payal, juggles a job and her two kids' after-school dance, swim and math lessons.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
Lawmakers will gather at the White House next week for a working session on immigration reform, a meeting that has been highly anticipated by Latino leaders eager for President Obama to honor his campaign promise to put millions of undocumented workers on a "pathway to citizenship." But many Democrats are now concluding that they may well not have the muscle to pass such a controversial measure -- at least not immediately, and possibly not until after the 2010 midterm election.
SPORTS
May 28, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
The familiar sentence, "No Frenchman has won the French Open since Yannick Noah in 1983," may lack the dreariness of the ancient refrain, "No British man has won Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936," but many of the locals here clearly want to delete that first sentence. They get loud during French players' matches, demonstrating that they might even care, not a given at a tournament where Roger Federer once said he got a kick out of the fans trickling in slowly from lunch.
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