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Home Electronics

BUSINESS
January 8, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Compaq Computer Chief Executive Eckhard Pfeiffer told his audience this weekend at the annual Consumer Electronics Show that the personal computer industry had just entered its adolescence and "its hormones are just kicking in," he was referring to the huge growth potential for the business as PCs become integral to home life. But he could also have been referring to the awkward stage that the global consumer electronics industry is now going through.
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HOME & GARDEN
March 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
How many illegal copies of videotapes do you have in your home? Come on now, 'fess up. You're not alone. The average VCR-owning household is thought to have 3.7. However, the average number of illegal copies in 1991 was considerably higher--5.6 per household--and the number seems to be continuing to decline. One reason is a system created by the Macrovision Corp. that thwarts attempts to duplicate prerecorded videos.
HOME & GARDEN
November 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
Easier living through the wizardry of home electronics has remained an unfulfilled, but tantalizing, promise for years. In development for more than a decade, whole-house automation systems have been held back by their high cost. However, prices have dropped dramatically during the past year, making it possible for sophisticated home electronics to become a common feature in new homes. Home automation systems allow homeowners to control an array of house functions from a single control panel.
HOME & GARDEN
April 3, 1993 | From Associated Press
Today's electronic sound decoders take the Dolby stereo audio signal present on many laser discs and videotapes and split it into four separate channels of sound--left, center, right and surround--to produce an audio effect known as surround sound. When the separate channels of sound are routed to strategically located speakers, they can turn a living room into a home theater. According to Video Magazine, decoders can offer the most for your money in upgrading a home theater environment.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks ago, Lori Cramer sadly recounted to students at El Capitan High School the grim consequences of drunken driving that had touched the school in a particularly eerie way. Her husband Phillip, 34, a 1975 alumnus of El Capitan in Lakeside, had been killed on his bike last July when a Volkswagen bug took a 40 m.p.h. curve very close to the school at 70 m.p.h. and slammed him off the road and into the middle of Interstate 8.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1991 | CHRIS KRAUL, SAN DIEGO COUNTY BUSINESS EDITOR
Consumer electronics manufacturer Denon Thursday introduced what it billed as the first compact disc recorder for the home at a price of $19,000. Up to now, consumers have been able to buy prerecorded compact discs and players but could not record their own CDs from existing records, tapes or other discs. The Denon system enables them to do that--albeit at a hefty price. Denon said it expects its prices to drop sharply within the next year and that units could sell for $5,000 in two years.
HOME & GARDEN
September 22, 1990 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Home Design
If "The Jetsons" used to be part of your Saturday morning TV ritual, it's a fair bet that you also used to dream about having a few of George Jetson's household gadgets to monkey around with. George would push a button and out of the ceiling would come the TV. He'd tell a machine to brew him up a cup of coffee and there it would be, piping hot. If he wanted to check on the kids, he just poked a button on the TV remote and there on the screen would appear Judy and Elroy in their respective rooms.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bored with video games? Seen all the latest videos? Your compact discs collecting dust? Not to worry. The creators of CDs are working on the next wave in home entertainment: an audiovisual device that combines the interaction of video games, the visual quality of videotapes and the sound of a compact disc. Called Compact Disc Interactive (or CD-I), the product being developed by Sony Corp. and N. V.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | STEVE METCALF, The Hartford Courant
These days, the home-electronics industry lives by an uncomplicated rule. Essentially, it requires that every few years the industry shall introduce a Big, Expensive (But Not Too Expensive!) New Thing that everybody decides is necessary to own in order to live a Satisfying, Quality Life. In the '80s, the VCR has been the most classic and profitable example. More recently it has been the compact-disc player.
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