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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1988
A reference to "Rambo III's" filming locations (Outtakes, by Pat H. Broeske, Jan. 3) stated that the film is shooting in Arizona. Not true. They are staying in Yuma, but they are shooting in California. Also, in the Movie Chart Jan. 10 you managed to mention where four of five films were scheduled to shoot; all but the one that is shooting in California--"The Witching Hour." California won that picture back from Vancouver, through the cooperation of the unions and the efforts of the California Film Commission.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Audiotape of a casual phone conversation in the new documentary "Our Nixon" reveals a startling fact about President Nixon and his staff: that they were unfamiliar with the most popular television program in America at the time, "All in the Family. " In the call, White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman seemed to think the influential sitcom was a panel show, and Nixon thought it was a movie that villainized a "square hard hat" (Archie Bunker). Forty-one years after the Watergate scandal first broke, the seemingly prosaic detail about the Nixon White House's lack of pop culture awareness provides the kind of context that often gets lost when the first draft of history is written.
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NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Robert Hilburn
The lowdown If you're into Bob Dylan enough to follow his set lists faithfully on the Internet, you're just the kind of cultist who is going to want to be at the University of Judiasm in Bel-Air on Saturday night. Mickey Jones, the drummer on Dylan's 1966 world "electric" tour, will host a screening of the documentary he has put together from 8-millimeter home movies he took during the tour. * Beware Jones is no D.A. Pennebaker, the director of "Don't Look Back," the classic '60s documentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Susan King
The Cinecon Classic Film Festival, which kicks off Thursday at the Egyptian Theatre, offers hard-core film buffs a chance to see 35-mm prints of rare and obscure movies. In other words, this is not for the "Gone With the Wind" crowd. Among the highlights of this year's 49th annual festival are the English and French-language versions of "A Tough Winter," a 1930 Our Gang comedy short; "The Return of Sherlock Holmes," a 1929 talkie with Clive Brook that was considered lost for many years; the 1930 musical comedy "Let's Go Native" with Jeanette MacDonald and Jack Oakie; and "Hi, Good Lookin'," a1944 "B" musical starring Ozzie Nelson and Harriet Hilliard.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1992 | DAVID SCHEIDERER
"Roy Rogers, King of the Cowboys" (at 6 and 10 tonight on cable's American Movie Classics) might better be called "Roy Rogers, King of the Home Movies." Rogers, 81, is certainly an apt subject for a TV retrospective. Born in modest circumstances in Cincinnati, he became one of Hollywood's leading movie stars, one of TV's first series stars and a restaurant mogul. This successful life, marked by four cruel tragedies, is the stuff of filmland legend.
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS, Lewis is a free-lance writer who resides in Tarzana.
You've recorded it all on film: the day you brought Jennifer home from the hospital, her first exploratory steps and first birthday, that vacation at Yellowstone when Old Faithful performed on cue and a humungous bear ate your provisions. Graduations, weddings, family reunions--your rites of passage are all faithfully stored on your home movies. But how often do you get a chance to relive those priceless memories, and what is the condition of your films after a number of years?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2003 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
They arrived on Saturday clutching plastic bags, cardboard boxes and faded suitcases full of memories: old canisters of film, stored away for decades, glimpses of lives and places that no longer exist. In a back room at the Japanese American National Museum in downtown Los Angeles, dozens of Californians, old and young, unveiled their treasures -- home movies shot years ago -- for complete strangers. They told stories, cried tears and, more than anything, marveled at what once had been.
NEWS
December 9, 1985 | Associated Press
A television station today broadcast excerpts from a videotape of Soviet dissident Andrei D. Sakharov, who was seen talking with a hospital director, walking along a street and carrying his wife's suitcases. His family denounced the tape as "KGB home movies." Bild newspaper, which obtained the nearly 23-minute videotape and made it available for broadcast, said it is evidence of a Kremlin campaign to refute reports that the Nobel Prize-winning physicist is ailing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1992 | DAVID SCHEIDERER
Just when you thought it was safe to channel surf across the cable box comes the Discovery Channel's "Shark Week '92," an eight-day festival of shark-related documentaries. The first installment is "The Man Who Loves Sharks" (Sunday at 5 and 10 p.m.). Stan Waterman, one of the world's leading underwater photographers, is the subject of the program, which might be better titled "The Man Who Photographs Sharks and Loves His Family."
NEWS
June 13, 1986 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
Dads, it seems, always get the short end of the parental holiday stick. Maybe it's because mothers are so deucedly easy to buy for. A few roses, a lump of prettily wrapped chocolate on Mother's Day and their eyes fill with grateful tears, and your conscience is assuaged for another year--even if the tears are from her chocolate allergy. But fathers. You can't buy them orchid corsages. You'd feel silly, giving them boxes of candy gussied up in pink ribbon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013
While it's one memory lane some may rather not stroll down, the divisive near-term-and-a-half of America's disgraced 37th president is recounted with economy, focus and, at times, pitch-dark humor in the documentary "Our Nixon. " Director Penny Lane, with an able assist from editor Francisco Bello, offers an absorbing snapshot of Richard M. Nixon's fraught, occasionally triumphant time in the Oval Office, culled largely from more than 500 reels of long-forgotten Super-8 home movie footage shot by Nixon aides - and eventual Watergate break-in conspirators - John Ehrlichman, H.R Haldeman and Dwight Chapin.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
“What would you do if you won Powerball?” No, that's not a news headline; it's from an ad on The Times' website. The Powerball lottery has come to California -- finally -- and though, with its lousy odds, that may not work out for most Californians, at least it means ad revenue (and perhaps job security) around here. So I'm for it. But, in between worrying about North Korea and wondering what's so hard about making background checks mandatory for all gun buyers, I admit it: I started to wonder just what I would do if I won Powerball.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, Los Angeles Times
They were planning to spend nearly $500,000 on a home theater. What was an additional $35,000 to show first-run movies? When Ken and Carol Schultz began remodeling their 10,000-square-foot San Diego-area residence, they spared no expense on a screening room. The couple tricked it out with custom-built armchairs with heat and massage functions, and a Runco 3-D-capable projector with a price of about $100,000. But the most unusual feature of the theater is a $35,000 device that offers 24-hour rentals of first-run movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
In "Sinister," Ethan Hawke plays a down-on-his-luck true crime writer desperate for a hit, who moves his family into a house in which the previous occupants died under ominous circumstances. That turns out to be a big mistake. He soon discovers a box of old home movies, actual filmstrip movies with the necessary projector even, in the attic that seem to be a series of snuff films, families murdered over decades with only fleeting glimpses of a mysterious, ghoulish figure pointing to who is behind it all. Pursuing the story of those films and whether he has put his own family in the path of whoever made them drive Hawke's writer relentlessly to the brink of madness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2010
The empty nest looms like the existential void in "The Kids Grow Up," documentarian Doug Block's latest examination of the mysteries of the family. Having explored his parents' marriage in "51 Birch Street," here he focuses his lens at even shorter range as he suffers through the final year at home for his college-bound only child. For those who can get past his self-involvement, "Kids" strikes more than a few deep chords. Block wears his neuroses so guilelessly on his sleeve and organizes his material with such skill, that what might have been insufferable navel-gazing attains poignancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2010 | By Rich Connell, Los Angeles Times
Normally, it would be a major buzz kill to bust out the home movies at a convivial gathering of strangers. But that was the draw Saturday at the Echo Park Film Center ? a serendipitous journey through personal memories and shared history captured in jumpy, grainy, corny and ultimately engrossing home movies spanning much of the last century. "You have no idea what might turn up," said Sean Savage, a film archivist with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Savage and fellow archivist Brian Drischell organized the film portion of Los Angeles' Home Movie Day . The worldwide event takes place one day a year and pays homage to the small treasures hidden away on old 8- and 16-millimeter film reels and aging videotapes stashed in attics or boxes at garage sales.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | RICK SAMMON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A few years ago, the producers of "Oprah" invited me on the program to showcase the latest and greatest in consumer video cameras, also known as camcorders. I packed up eight camcorders, from full-size VHS models (about the size of a four-slot toaster) to compact Hi-8-millimeter models (roughly the size of a club sandwich) and headed off for Chicago. I had two carry-on bags that weighed more than a sack of potatoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2009 | Susan King
La Femme Film Festival, which shines a spotlight on women's roles in the entertainment industry, opens this evening at the Grove with "Love Hurts," starring Carrie-Anne Moss. Other films in the festival, which continues through Sunday at the Renberg Theatre, are "Fatal Secrets," with Lea Thompson and Tess Harper, "Oak Hill," with Sally Kirkland and "Oy Vey! My Son Is Gay!," with Carmen Electra and Lainie Kazan. The festival also will be honoring Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Marla Gibbs, Sara Gilbert and Diablo Cody at its award ceremony on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | Kevin Thomas; Glenn Whipp; Gary Goldstein
Sarah Townsend's "Believe: The Eddie Izzard Story" illuminates the life and career of the protean, gender-bending comedian-actor through an astonishing collection of footage. Beginning with home movies from Izzard's childhood, the film moves through years of performances on the street and in small clubs to a triumphant West End debut, at which time he declared himself a transvestite, to his international acclaim as a stand-up comic and as a stage and screen actor. This fine documentary, understandably years in the making, commences with Izzard's humiliating experience in being accused of using old material in a new show and unfolds as he launches a British workshop tour of his 2003 comeback, "Sexie," as a prelude to a world tour that culminated later that year in London's vast Wembley Arena, where he played before 44,000 fans over four days.
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