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Home Phoneline Networking Alliance

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BUSINESS
December 1, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
Industry consortium Home Phoneline Networking Alliance will unveil a technology standard today that lets data run over home telephone lines at 10 times the speed of the current standard and not interfere with existing services. The standard, which would be built into electronic devices that use phone lines, is based on technology developed by Broadcom Corp. in Irvine, with assistance by Lucent Technologies Inc. in New Jersey.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1999 | P.J. Huffstutter
Industry consortium Home Phoneline Networking Alliance will unveil a technology standard today that lets data run over home telephone lines at 10 times the speed of the current standard and not interfere with existing services. The standard, which would be built into electronic devices that use phone lines, is based on technology developed by Broadcom Corp. in Irvine, with assistance by Lucent Technologies Inc. in New Jersey.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, P.J. Huffstutter covers high technology for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7830 and at p.j.huffstutter@latimes.com
Now that personal computers are getting cheaper, it's becoming more common to have two or more machines in the same household. But owning two PCs doesn't mean consumers have to buy double computerized everything--printers, scanners, Internet accounts.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jumping into the burgeoning home-network arena, chip maker Broadcom Corp. and networking company Tut Systems Inc. unveiled technology Monday that promises to turn any residence into the fantasy Jetson home. Irvine-based Broadcom, the leading supplier of chips for cable modems and set-top boxes, said its MediaShare technology helps information race over common copper telephone wires at previously unattainable speeds.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Broadcom Corp., the Irvine semiconductor powerhouse that has been on a buying spree, said Wednesday it agreed to acquire privately held AltoCom Inc., which makes software that acts as a computer modem, for about $170 million in stock. Broadcom said it will issue about 1.62 million shares of its Class B stock for AltoCom, a 17-person software developer based in Mountain View.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Rolling Hills Estates, an upscale residential complex under construction in Poway in San Diego County, the houses are large and luxurious--and "smart." IBM Corp. hopes they will be the first wave of high-tech homes in California to adopt its Home Director service. As part of an aggressive push behind the computer company's home network solution, IBM is working with several California real estate developers to install and promote its high-speed home networking system.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Stepping into the forefront of the burgeoning market for high-speed home networks, Irvine-based chip maker Broadcom Corp. said Sunday that it will buy Silicon Valley's Epigram Inc. for $316 million in stock. Broadcom would issue 4.6 million Class B shares for privately held Epigram, a small Sunnyvale, Calif., engineering firm known for developing high-speed networking technology that can send data over existing phone lines in homes and small offices.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1999 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID
Now that PCs are getting cheaper, it's increasingly common to have two or more machines in the same household. It can also be a good idea. I love my children dearly, but I don't want them using the same machine I use for work and for tracking our family finances. If something goes wrong with my machine, I'd rather take responsibility or blame it on Bill Gates. I don't want to be pointing fingers at the kids.
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