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Home Rule

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1985 | From Reuters
British Liberal leader David Steel Friday promised home rule for both Scotland and Wales within two years should an electoral alliance between his party and the social Democrats win power at the next election. "We are determined to introduce the legislation needed to provide for the setting up of Scottish and Welsh parliaments," Steel told the closing session of his party's annual convention in the Scottish town of Dundee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Emily Foxhall
Newport Beach plans to petition the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a lower court decision that determined its ordinance regulating group homes is discriminatory. The City Council voted unanimously during a closed session meeting Tuesday to pursue the petition, the Daily Pilot reported . At stake is an ongoing argument over whether group homes in Newport Beach can challenge the municipal ordinance limiting homes for recovering alcoholics and drug addicts at trial. Many of the homes were forced out of the city by strict limits enacted in 2008 that were fueled by residents who complained about parking, traffic, cigarette smoke, noise and an ever-changing cast of neighbors.
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NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on Friday rejected the concept of home rule for Scotland. In a direct challenge to nationalists who want a transfer of power from Parliament in London to Scotland's capital of Edinburgh, Thatcher said this would be "yet another layer of government." In a speech to a Scottish newspaper audience, she said her government was as committed as ever to the union of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the United Kingdom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Arnold Arbiso, a quadriplegic living near Los Angeles, wanted to support the workers who bathe, dress and cook for him and other disabled Californians. So when they mobilized to join unions more than a decade ago, he used the knuckle on his little finger to dial the offices of state lawmakers and express his approval. The 60-year-old is now having misgivings, fearing that union demands could harm the very people the workers are hired to help. He is caught in the middle of a pay dispute that has divided labor leaders and advocates for the disabled, who have long been allies in promoting California's enormous and controversial home care program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John W. Hechinger Sr. 84, who chaired the first District of Columbia City Council, died Sunday, his 84th birthday, at his home in Washington, D.C. The cause was respiratory failure. Hechinger was a committed supporter of home rule for the District of Columbia, which traditionally had been controlled by Congress. In 1967, President Lyndon B.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine the 25-year experiment of home rule in the nation's capital as a troubled marriage. Congress is cast as the aloof head of household and the District of Columbia government as its financially dependent spouse. For most of their debt-ridden union, the breadwinner has quietly seethed at the deterioration of the family home. The house is constantly in disrepair, and some parts are unlivable. The children aren't studying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1995 | MARIAN BERGESON, State Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) completed her 10th year in the State Senate last month. On Monday, she joins the Orange County Board of Supervisors as its representative from the 5th District. and
Sometime in the middle of the Fiesta Bowl on Monday, my term on the Orange County Board of Supervisors technically begins. Emotionally it began early in December, when I heard about the $1.5-billion "paper loss" to the treasurer's investment pool. Nearly everyone in the county, from this state senator to the most distant school board member, instantly became part of the crisis. In these pages and others, I've taken a dose or two of the blame even before assuming office.
OPINION
November 7, 1999
Your Oct. 27 editorial, "Taxes: a State of Confusion," is right on the mark. The recent decision by a Superior Court judge in Sonoma County, that the transfer by the state of local property taxes to the schools was illegal, is a step forward in regaining "home rule" for cities and counties in California. However, until there is significant overhaul and reform of Prop. 13, cities, counties and special districts will be at the mercy of the state. Prop. 13 should be reformed to provide the same benefits to homeowners who bought their homes after 1976, which would equalize their tax burden with those who had purchased their homes prior to 1976.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | CHARLES J. HANLEY, Associated Press
Off on their own, they would be a little giant among nations. But the Eskimos of Greenland cling to mother Denmark the way their isolated hamlets hug the granite-and-ice coastline of this harsh land. The 44,000 native Greenlanders, who won home rule eight years ago, resent the Danish workers who still take the best jobs on their huge Arctic island. But they need the Danish money that keeps the schools, hospitals and welfare programs going.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1990 | WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR.
We do well to be jubilant about events in Nicaragua, but we need to be careful before letting that blessed event generate incontinence in our faith in democracy. To begin with, the event needs to be distinguished from what happened in Eastern Europe in the closing months of 1989. There one had popular uprisings whose success hung on the willingness of a Soviet dictator to let things go in the satellite states. We did not see democracy in action in Eastern Europe.
OPINION
April 16, 2011
There were winners and losers in the eleventh-hour spending compromise reached by President Obama, Senate Democrats and House Republicans. Among the conspicuous losers was the District of Columbia, which found itself overruled by Congress on two policy matters. First, the deal prohibits the use of public funds for abortion in the district. Second, it reinstates for five years a school voucher plan that leaders of the district opposed. Both actions are unjustifiable intrusions on the authority of the district government and dramatize the second-class status of the nation's capital.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2010 | By Ronald D. Orol
A behind-the-scenes battle is forming over a provision of the sweeping bank reform law that will affect mortgage availability. At issue is a provision in the Dodd-Frank Act that requires banks to have "skin in the game" by retaining some of the risk of loans they package and sell. The goal of the measure is to eliminate one problem that led to the financial crisis: lenders packaging and selling subprime mortgages they knew would fail. Lawmakers drafting the legislation included a measure that would exempt certain mortgages from the risk retention rule if they met certain high underwriting standards.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2010 | By Kenneth R. Harney
You may have missed it, but the Federal Reserve proposed far-reaching new rules Oct. 18 that could affect home real estate appraisals ? and millions of owners' equity holdings ? nationwide. The rules, which are scheduled to take interim effect in December and then be finalized next spring, prohibit outside interference in appraisers' valuations and require lenders to report evidence of appraiser misconduct to regulatory authorities. They replace the controversial Home Valuation Code of Conduct imposed on the mortgage and real estate industries last year by giant investors Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. But here's a key practical question: Under the Fed's new proposals, are you as a buyer, seller or refinance applicant certain to be protected against inaccurate valuations produced by appraisers working for low fees who are unfamiliar with your local market?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2010
JONATHAN MOTZFELDT Former premier of Greenland Jonathan Motzfeldt, 72, a former premier of Greenland who spearheaded a drive for more self-rule and opposed U.S. bases on the semiautonomous Danish territory, died of a brain hemorrhage Thursday at Queen Ingrid Hospital in Nuuk, Greenland, the local government announced. Motzfeldt led the Arctic island's government from 1979 to 1991 and again from 1997 to 2002, and is considered one of the founding fathers of its home rule agreement with Denmark.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz and Rong-Gong Lin ii, Bloomekatz and Lin are Times staff writers.
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger called for a review of building standards and emergency procedures Sunday after the Oakridge Mobile Home Park was devastated by the Sayre fire and a backup power system failed at a Sylmar hospital. "We should start thinking about building all of the mobile homes with the same fire retardant that's used . . . in those fire-prone areas where we build homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Parents may legally home-school their children in California even if they lack a teaching credential, a state appellate court ruled Friday. The decision is a reversal of the court's earlier position, which effectively prohibited most home schooling and sparked fear throughout the state's estimated 166,000 home-schoolers. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who had vowed to allow home schooling through legislation if the court did not act, praised the ruling.
OPINION
March 29, 2008
Re "Volcano in the Himalayas," Opinion, March 23 I am in sympathy with the Tibetans in their fight for home rule but find fault with some of the details in Joshua Kurlantzick's Op-Ed. Barbershops with girls offering sexual services in back rooms are ubiquitous in the major cities throughout China and are not solely symbolic of oppression and poverty in Lhasa and Tibet. It is as if to say that Americans are impoverished and oppressed because an occasional massage parlor offers sexual services.
OPINION
April 16, 2011
There were winners and losers in the eleventh-hour spending compromise reached by President Obama, Senate Democrats and House Republicans. Among the conspicuous losers was the District of Columbia, which found itself overruled by Congress on two policy matters. First, the deal prohibits the use of public funds for abortion in the district. Second, it reinstates for five years a school voucher plan that leaders of the district opposed. Both actions are unjustifiable intrusions on the authority of the district government and dramatize the second-class status of the nation's capital.
OPINION
March 29, 2008
Re "Volcano in the Himalayas," Opinion, March 23 I am in sympathy with the Tibetans in their fight for home rule but find fault with some of the details in Joshua Kurlantzick's Op-Ed. Barbershops with girls offering sexual services in back rooms are ubiquitous in the major cities throughout China and are not solely symbolic of oppression and poverty in Lhasa and Tibet. It is as if to say that Americans are impoverished and oppressed because an occasional massage parlor offers sexual services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2007
The death of a man found unconscious in his home has been ruled a homicide. Rejinold Harry, 45, found in his apartment Monday, suffered external injuries, but investigators were waiting for the results of an autopsy before providing further details, Sgt. Linda King, a spokeswoman for the Fullerton Police Department, said Tuesday. King said Harry's wife arrived at their apartment in the 2400 block of East Nutwood Avenue about 2 p.m. and found him unconscious.
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