Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHome Security
IN THE NEWS

Home Security

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
AT&T, looking to take home security into the future, has begun offering " Digital Life ," a new service that allows AT&T customers to control various parts of their homes with their smartphones or tablets. The AT&T "smarthome" service allows users to control their home's security cameras, door locks, lights, thermostats, small appliances and other parts all from a mobile app that runs on Apple, Android and Windows Phone devices. A YouTube video demonstrating Digital Life shows an AT&T representative unlocking her front door, turning on her fireplace, and even dealing with a water leak by remotely shutting off the valve with her tablet.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- For years, Google has been the search engine that connects people to all points on the Internet. Now it also wants to be the company that connects people's homes to the Internet. The search giant said Monday that it agreed to buy Nest Labs for $3.2 billion in cash. The Palo Alto start-up founded in 2010 by Tony Fadell and Matt Rogers, two former iPhone and iPod engineers at Apple, makes slick Internet-connected home devices. The first two offerings were a thermostat and a smoke alarm.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
If someone comes to your door selling home security systems, be wary: They could be breaking the law and they could be trying to scam you, according to the state Department of Consumer Affairs. Key things to know: • Anyone selling home alarm systems door-to-door in California is required to have passed a criminal background check and have been licensed by the Bureau of Security and Investigative Services. But in reality, warned the consumer agency, many sellers have done neither.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri and Andrea Chang
For Raffi Kajberouni, the keys to his Santa Clarita home have become relics. If he locks himself out, no problem. If a friend arrives at his two-story house before him, there's no waiting outside for Kajberouni to arrive. Kajberouni taps his smartphone and his front door unlocks. He can also turn down the thermostat or view his home security cameras from anywhere in the world. "A lot of my friends are jealous," the 31-year-old said. "It's like the home from 'Back to the Future,' but in real life.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
For decades, the only theft the cable industry worried about was people trying to get MTV and HBO without paying for them. Now some of the biggest cable companies - including Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc. - are looking to do more than just safeguard their signals from piracy. They want to use their broadband service to protect your big-screen television, the couch in front of it and even the family jewels with their own home-security systems. They're not just feeling altruistic.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
AT&T Inc. is moving beyond cellphone and Internet service and getting into home automation and security. The wireless giant Monday announced plans for an all-digital, Internet-connected system that it said would give users "unparalleled control and security" of their homes using Web-enabled devices such as PCs, tablets and smartphones. The company said it was planning a nationwide launch, with trials of the service to begin in Atlanta and Dallas this summer. AT&T joins several other companies that are seeing revenue opportunities in home security.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2001 | From Reuters
Troubled utility owner Edison International said Thursday that it agreed to sell its Edison Select home security subsidiary to a unit of Tyco International Ltd. in a bid to pay down debt maturing this year. Terms were not disclosed. Rosemead-based Edison, the parent of Southern California Edison, has $1.2 billion of debt to pay down this year, including $618 million due Saturday. On Wednesday, Edison received $1.
REAL ESTATE
February 22, 1987 | DALE BALDWIN
With the continuing--and seemingly endless--high rate of crime against people and property, it's no wonder that my columns on home security elicit an above-average reader response. This isn't surprising, with crime a major concern of people everywhere. What can the average homeowner do about such a complex subject as home security? Plenty, according to security authorities Doug Kirkpatrick and Daniel J. Levine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing concern over preventable fire deaths, city officials Thursday announced a program to get homeowners to remove illegally installed security bars from windows throughout Los Angeles. In October, the Fire Department will launch a public education campaign aimed at getting illegal bars removed, while building inspectors will step up efforts to cite those with the dangerous security devices, according to Fire Capt. Steve Ruda.
REAL ESTATE
November 17, 1991 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Swimming pools are as much a part of Southern California's lore as palm trees and sunshine. But unfortunately, pools are also among the Southland's biggest killers. Nearly 1,000 Americans died in their pools or spas last year, most of them victims of accidental drownings. About three-quarters of those casualties were children. Drowning is the leading cause of death for Southland children under age five. Thousands more swimmers suffer injuries every year.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
AT&T, looking to take home security into the future, has begun offering " Digital Life ," a new service that allows AT&T customers to control various parts of their homes with their smartphones or tablets. The AT&T "smarthome" service allows users to control their home's security cameras, door locks, lights, thermostats, small appliances and other parts all from a mobile app that runs on Apple, Android and Windows Phone devices. A YouTube video demonstrating Digital Life shows an AT&T representative unlocking her front door, turning on her fireplace, and even dealing with a water leak by remotely shutting off the valve with her tablet.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
If someone comes to your door selling home security systems, be wary: They could be breaking the law and they could be trying to scam you, according to the state Department of Consumer Affairs. Key things to know: • Anyone selling home alarm systems door-to-door in California is required to have passed a criminal background check and have been licensed by the Bureau of Security and Investigative Services. But in reality, warned the consumer agency, many sellers have done neither.
WORLD
June 26, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - It was more money than she had ever dreamed of, stuffed into stockings and concealed under her clothes like a python around her waist. On the bus trip back to Zimbabwe, her homeland, Samkeliso Moyo was terrified that her secret money would be discovered or stolen, and she'd lose everything. Born into the poorest family in her village, she grew up hungry, with no shoes and one thin cotton dress. She never once got a Christmas present. She ran away from exploitation and abuse at 11, and got her first job at 13, earning a few dollars a month.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
AT&T Inc. is moving beyond cellphone and Internet service and getting into home automation and security. The wireless giant Monday announced plans for an all-digital, Internet-connected system that it said would give users "unparalleled control and security" of their homes using Web-enabled devices such as PCs, tablets and smartphones. The company said it was planning a nationwide launch, with trials of the service to begin in Atlanta and Dallas this summer. AT&T joins several other companies that are seeing revenue opportunities in home security.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
For decades, the only theft the cable industry worried about was people trying to get MTV and HBO without paying for them. Now some of the biggest cable companies - including Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc. - are looking to do more than just safeguard their signals from piracy. They want to use their broadband service to protect your big-screen television, the couch in front of it and even the family jewels with their own home-security systems. They're not just feeling altruistic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2011 | By Abby Sewell and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Alonzo Ester enjoyed showing off the spoils of his success, including his Rolls-Royce Phantom and his Mediterranean-style home in Baldwin Hills. But friends said he was also a cautious, street-smart man who even avoided the Inglewood nightclub he owned during the late-night hours. Early Friday, as a measure of his caution, a security guard from the Dynasty Restaurant and Lounge followed 67-year-old businessman partway home, believing that a white truck or SUV was staking out the nightclub on Locust Street.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1990 | S.J. Diamond
Looking crazed and vicious, the man is pictured breaking through a door. The message is it's a jungle out there, such creeps hit one in four homes, and maybe yours. The pitch: for $395, ADT Security Systems will help "keep him out." Residential security is the fastest-growing segment of a young industry. Eighty percent of operating security systems were installed in the 1980s, according to the Santa Monica-based Security Industry Assn. Residential work provided perhaps $2.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | JESSA VARTANIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I keep a black canister of tear gas stuffed between the pillows on the passenger side of my queen-size bed. Not Mace. Military tear gas; the same stuff they used in Waco. I do not keep it in my purse, on my key ring or in my glove box like some women I know. Nor do I carry it when I go running alone on dirt trails in the foothills or around the streets of my neighborhood before dawn. No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
Beverly Hills detectives investigating the slaying of Hollywood publicist Ronni Chasen believe she was shot moments before her car crashed and came to rest off Sunset Boulevard early Tuesday. Authorities on Wednesday stressed that they have few leads in the case and that the motive for the attack is unclear. But they are focusing heavily on forensic evidence gathered from the spot where Chasen was found shot several times in her Mercedes coupe. Residents who heard the crash found Chasen slumped over the steering wheel bleeding, with the passenger-side window of her car shattered.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010
Much of the buzz at the Consumer Electronics Show has been about connectivity, specifically the way in which TVs are bringing Internet services into the living room. Kwikset went a few steps further and brought connectivity to the front door. The company exhibited its SmartCode With Home Connect products, which allow homeowners to lock and unlock a door from anywhere in the world through the Internet or mobile phone. Among other features: Vacationers can set up the devices to send an e-mail or text message if a door is unlocked while they're away.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|