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BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Canadians are shifting their preference to another fruit, er, smartphone. Apple's iPhone has taken over Research in Motion's BlackBerry in Canada, a blow to Waterloo, Ontario-based RIM. The company shipped 2.08 million BlackBerrys last year in Canada compared with 2.85 million units for Apple, according to data compiled by IDC and Bloomberg . In 2010, BlackBerry topped the iPhone by half a million. In 2008, the year after the iPhone made its debut, RIM outsold Apple by almost five to one, Bloomberg said.
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NATIONAL
March 1, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Weeks after he took office, President Obama met privately with 40 grieving Americans, many clutching photographs of loved ones lost in terrorist attacks. The new president told them he would be closing Guantanamo Bay military prison within the year and putting many of the detainees there on trial in the U.S., where justice would be swifter. Five years later, the first and probably only federal court trial of a Sept. 11-related case will start with jury selection on Monday at a U.S. District courthouse in Lower Manhattan, blocks from ground zero, where the World Trade Center once stood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Do n 't ask blues musician Jimmy Caravan what measure of success it takes to get bookings in Orange County clubs--he's still looking for the answer to that question. "In Los Angeles, it's difficult to get into the clubs," Caravan, 44, said during an interview earlier this week in the garage recording studio at his Anaheim home. "In Orange County, it's impossible." Organist Caravan, however, isn't just another struggling local musician griping about a lack of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When last we saw Walter Mosley's detective Easy Rawlins, he had just lost control of a car he was driving on the Pacific Coast Highway north of Malibu. This was in the closing pages of the 11th (and apparently final) Rawlins book, "Blonde Faith," published in 2007. "The back of my car hit something hard," Easy tells us, "a boulder no doubt. Something clenched down on my left foot and pain lanced up my leg. I ignored this, though, realizing that in a few seconds, I'd be dead. " And yet, six years later, Easy is back, narrating a new novel, "Little Green" (Doubleday: 292 pp., $25.95)
TRAVEL
September 3, 2000 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The kids, dressed in trendy board shorts and sandals, put down their CD players and stepped out of the minivan into another century. There, outside the farmhouse, they saw longhaired little girls wearing plain, solid-colored dresses up to their necks--no tank tops or shorts despite the summer heat--giving one another rides on a simple wooden wagon. Older boys wearing dark pants, long-sleeved shirts and straw hats were tinkering with handmade birdhouses they hoped to sell. All were barefoot.
SPORTS
December 16, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Philadelphia Eagles are two victories away from having home-field advantage at Veterans Stadium -- something that teams such as Green Bay and Tampa Bay don't want to see. The Eagles clinched the NFC East by beating Washington, 34-21, Sunday. With victories in road games against the Dallas Cowboys and the New York Giants, they will be home for every playoff game they play.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2003 | Helen Jung, Associated Press
Forget the Starbucks on the corner. Ignore the coffeehouse across the street and the espresso drive-through a block away. Seattle needs another coffee chain. Really. At least that's the story from Emeryville, Calif.-based Peet's Coffee & Tea, which will open its first Seattle coffeehouse in June in the Fremont neighborhood -- a nervy move into the home turf of resident caffeine king Starbucks Corp.
SPORTS
October 24, 2001 | Mal Florence
Mitch Albom in the Detroit Free Press: "At one point in Sunday's Lion-Titan game, play was stopped because of a rip in the artificial turf. Eventually--and we've had commando raids completed in less time--someone from the Silverdome grounds crew showed up. Here is what he did: He took duct tape, double-sided the problem, and stomped on it until it stayed put. "Oh, if we could only do that to the Lions! "Tennessee 27, Detroit 24."
SPORTS
January 24, 2002 | GARY KLEIN
John Savage spent the last 18 months helping to design everything from UC Irvine's baseball facility to the Anteaters' uniforms. On Friday night the coach who was selected to resurrect Irvine's program finally puts his team on the field for the school's first game since dropping the sport after the 1992 season because of budget cuts. The Anteaters play San Diego in a nonconference matchup that opens the college season in the Southland and is expected to draw a sellout crowd.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 2004 | Susan Heeger
Professional landsape designers may work on big estates, but most come home to yards that look more like the real world. They may have small, tight lots and matching budgets, views of phone lines and neighbors' roofs, and nowhere to go for peace and quiet. Like many of us, they might be renters, with little incentive to plant someone else's ground. Here's where ingenuity really counts, and where pros have the predictable advantage.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
Antonio Candelaria had an embarrassing problem: He was lying in the driveway of his Albuquerque home Saturday night, his foot stuck beneath his motorcycle. He couldn't budge. The 50-year-old could have called just about anyone - his best friend, his local priest or, heck, even his mother-in-law. But no, Candelaria whipped out his cellphone and called police, who arrived to promptly arrest the motorcyclist on suspicion of driving under the influence. Albuquerque police said Candelaria's breath test results registered above 0.16, which is twice the legal limit in New Mexico.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | By James Rainey
Paul Ryan really gets irritated about the way the federal government has driven the debt to new heights, trying to boost the economy with stimulus spending. But he's also of a mind that once the Bush and Obama administrations put the pork on the table, he wouldn't be doing his job if he didn't get some hunks for his Wisconsin constituents. The Boston Globe had one of those neat stories this week showing how politicians don't let the hobgoblin of consistency clutter up their minds or actions.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2012 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
MECHANICSBURG, Pa. - Rick Santorum is back on familiar ground, seeking redemption and a lifeline for his presidential candidacy in the state that rejected him almost six years ago. The former senator from Pennsylvania has resurrected his career after a shattering 2006 reelection defeat. Dismissed as a hopeless long shot when his presidential run began, he'll finish no worse than second for the Republican nomination. At 53, he's one of the nation's leading social conservatives, and his long-range future has never looked brighter.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Paul West
The end of the Republican presidential contest was looming as Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum headed for campaign stops Wednesday in Pennsylvania. A Romney victory on April 24 could be the culmination of a long and contentious primary war. Losing his home state would likely force Santorum to abandon an increasingly uphill attempt to carry the conflict all the way to the national convention in August. With a triple-primary sweep on Tuesday, Romney advanced more than halfway to the 1,144 delegates he needs to secure the nomination.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Canadians are shifting their preference to another fruit, er, smartphone. Apple's iPhone has taken over Research in Motion's BlackBerry in Canada, a blow to Waterloo, Ontario-based RIM. The company shipped 2.08 million BlackBerrys last year in Canada compared with 2.85 million units for Apple, according to data compiled by IDC and Bloomberg . In 2010, BlackBerry topped the iPhone by half a million. In 2008, the year after the iPhone made its debut, RIM outsold Apple by almost five to one, Bloomberg said.
SPORTS
February 9, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Timothy Bradley agreed in principle Thursday to fight Manny Pacquiao on June 9 at MGM Grand in Las Vegas, fulfilling a lifetime ambition for the unbeaten, Cathedral City-based world junior-welterweight champion. "This is about being the No. 1 fighter in the world, and that's what my goal has been for as long as I can remember," Bradley said. Bradley declined to reveal terms of his agreement, which he said could be signed as early as Friday, but his guarantee is believed to be more than $5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2006 | Michelle Keller, Times Staff Writer
Mary Burns was running door to door setting up neighborhood meetings to block the construction of a garbage-burning plant in Ontario in 1986 when a woman asked how long she'd been an activist. The fiery organizer had been called many things, but never that. "I was shocked," said the Mira Loma resident, 60. "I've been organizing my entire life, ever since I was a Girl Scout. But an activist?"
SPORTS
September 9, 2010
NFL tonight MINNESOTA AT NEW ORLEANS TV: Channel 4, 5:30 PDT. Line: Saints by 5. Over/Under: 48. Story line: The Vikings have a banged-up secondary — just three healthy corners. That's not the way you want to face the pass-happy Saints. Noise will be a factor too. Sam Farmer's pick: Saints 28, Vikings 21.
NEWS
January 10, 2012 | By Paul West
No matter what happens in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday, Mitt Romney should be grateful that his opponents didn't force him to play the expectations game. All available evidence suggests that Romney, with twice the support of his nearest rival in the latest polls, will roll to a solid victory. But a candidate can win and still fall short of expectations, dampening enthusiasm and giving rival campaigns encouragement for the next round of voting. That's why raising the bar for an opponent is a time-honored tactic in politics.
TRAVEL
January 1, 2012 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Director Steven Spielberg's "The Adventures of Tintin" starts innocently enough - with Tintin, it always does - at a flea market, where the dauntless boy reporter finds an old model boat. But blistering barnacles! - as his buddy Capt. Haddock would say - there's a secret inside about a long-lost pirate treasure. So Tintin sets out to find it, undeterred by goons with guns, crashes, explosions, cracks on the skull from behind. Hold it. Rewind. That flea market? I think I've seen it before.
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