Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHomeboy Industries
IN THE NEWS

Homeboy Industries

ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2011 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
Born into a family of gangbangers, Alicia Cadena grew up knowing only a life of crime. At 16, she left home and joined a gang in Bell Gardens. She engaged in theft, landed in jail for four months and then started selling drugs. After she lost custody of her three children, she decided to turn her life around. "I had been to different places — rehab centers and shelters," she said. Then a friend told her about Homeboy Industries, the gang intervention center run by Father Gregory Boyle.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 11, 2011 | By Gregory J. Boyle
Lorenzo had a hard time concealing his nervousness. Standing in front of a large room packed with Boeing employees in late March, the tall, lanky African American gang member described the arc of his life. At 22, he had spent nearly a third of his life incarcerated. Peering out of his round, black-rimmed glasses, he talked about his seven months at Homeboy Industries (the largest gang reentry program in the country), and about how he had moved quickly from the janitorial team to become an assistant in the accounting department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1995 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If peace had a smell, then in Boyle Heights it was the sharp and pungent odor of jalapenos and Cheddar cheese that wafted out of the tiny, mural-emblazoned bakery on Gless Street. * But the odor has vanished and no one can be sure if it will return. Homeboy Bakery, the bold experiment that converted gang members to bakers, has closed again, a year after an ambitious and optimistic restart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1995 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If peace had a smell, then in Boyle Heights it was the sharp and pungent odor of jalapenos and Cheddar cheese that wafted out of the tiny, mural-emblazoned bakery on Gless Street. But the odor has vanished and no one can be sure if it will return. Homeboy Bakery, the bold experiment that converted gang members to bakers, has closed again, a year after an ambitious and optimistic restart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2003 | Scott Glover, Times Staff Writer
At 24, Carlos Nieto's resume includes an armed robbery conviction, several stints in state prison for parole violations and a 12-year membership in the notorious Toonerville street gang. His job skills, which he acquired in prison, include the ability to make tattoo ink by melting down chess pieces and being able to fashion a spear capable of inflicting serious injury from a rolled up newspaper and syrup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2005 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
The former gangbangers at Homeboy Industries were not quite sure what to expect Wednesday when First Lady Laura Bush paid them a call at their silk-screening business in a grimy warehouse district in downtown Los Angeles. Secret Service agents and the media swarmed the place as half a dozen young men screened logos onto bright yellow T-shirts. "It's crazy," said Archie Dominguez, 26, a merchandise manager. "Of all the programs out there, she's coming to Homeboy."
OPINION
July 11, 2009 | By TIM RUTTEN, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Were you thinking of having your car washed this weekend? Well, let the Prius or Bentley go dirty for another week and consider spending just $10 on a "virtual carwash," the proceeds of which will go to save the lives of some of our city's most imperiled young people. Car washes are an Eastside tradition. When someone falls on hard times -- loses a job, suffers an illness, needs to make a family member's bail or pay for an unexpected burial -- neighbors hold a car wash. Homeboy Industries, the internationally admired gang-intervention program founded by Father Gregory Boyle, a Jesuit priest, in Boyle Heights more than 20 years ago, is about as good a neighbor to all of L.A. as you're likely to find, and the unapologetic goal of this column is to convince you to go to its website -- www.homeboy-industries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | By Jason Song
The nearly two-minute UC Irvine video looks like an appeal to prospective students, featuring a montage of undergraduates walking around campus, dancing in classrooms and celebrating big basketball victories. But the target audience becomes obvious at the end, when 7-foot-6 freshman center Mamadou Ndiaye looks directly into the camera while towering over a cardboard cutout of Barack Obama and says: "Mr. President, we should play ball together. " The video is the latest and perhaps most visible attempt by a university to attract a high-profile graduation speaker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
A letterpress print shop, a skateboard maker and an array of furniture, art and accessory stores will temporarily fill empty storefronts in Westwood Village this fall as part of an effort to bring back some buzz to the UCLA-adjacent retail area. The Hammer Museum on Monday announced details about its Arts ReStore LA project that will hit the neighborhood starting Nov. 1. The pop-up enterprises will run for 24 days and include more than a dozen vendors. In addition to retailers, an “Open Forum” event space and a speaker series featuring workshops by local artists will inhabit the village during the month.
OPINION
December 13, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Father Gregory Boyle, the Jesuit priest who has heroically labored for more than 20 years on behalf of the young men and women Los Angeles would most like to forget, likes to say that "nothing stops a bullet like a job." In fact, that's the slogan of Homeboy Industries, the phenomenally successful gang intervention program he created.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|