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Homeboys Movie

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
At 14, Eddie's daily routine starts with two hours of primping and pressing perfect creases in his trousers and T-shirts, and even more hours of "kicking back" in empty lots near his South Los Angeles home with other wanna-be gang members who rarely go to school. His mother leaves home for work at a minimum-wage job in the garment district at daybreak and does not return until after dark, so for most of the day Eddie is on his own.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Hangin' With the Homeboys" opens with three menacing hoodlums--two Puerto Rican, one black--loudly and aggressively picking a fight with another young black man on a New York subway. As the brawl escalates, the white passengers hug their purses, hide their jewelry and cower in the corner of the train. After a few seconds of smashing each other on the floor, the thugs leap laughing to their feet and thank their terrified audience for attending another performance of "ghetto theater."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Hangin' With the Homeboys" opens with three menacing hoodlums--two Puerto Rican, one black--loudly and aggressively picking a fight with another young black man on a New York subway. As the brawl escalates, the white passengers hug their purses, hide their jewelry and cower in the corner of the train. After a few seconds of smashing each other on the floor, the thugs leap laughing to their feet and thank their terrified audience for attending another performance of "ghetto theater."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
At 14, Eddie's daily routine starts with two hours of primping and pressing perfect creases in his trousers and T-shirts, and even more hours of "kicking back" in empty lots near his South Los Angeles home with other wanna-be gang members who rarely go to school. His mother leaves home for work at a minimum-wage job in the garment district at daybreak and does not return until after dark, so for most of the day Eddie is on his own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1991 | AL MARTINEZ
It was a night of unsettling contrasts. At the John Anson Ford Amphitheater, a sedate, largely middle-aged crowd sat under the stars and watched a Shakespearean comedy without the slightest hint of hostility. Not a shot was fired and no army of policemen was required to empty the place, even when the character Costard mixed up the love letters meant for Rosaline and Jaquenetta.
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