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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988
I am writing in response to Robert Sullivan's letter (Jan. 22) concerning homecare workers' right to organize a union and their suit to force Los Angeles County to take responsibility as the employer of homecare workers. In his letter, Sullivan makes some allegations which are incorrect. First, Sullivan claims that my statement that "It makes no sense that an 82-year-old person with Alzheimer's disease is the employer of record," is an attempt "to distort the truth." He says that an overwhelming majority of recipients of homecare services are younger.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2013 | By Paul Pringle and Hailey Branson-Potts, Los Angeles Times
A onetime rising star in national labor circles who headed California's biggest union local was convicted Monday on federal charges that he stole tens of thousands of dollars from his low-income members. Tyrone Freeman, who represented about 190,000 homecare workers as a leader of the Service Employees International Union, was found guilty on 14 counts after a 10-day trial in Los Angeles. Jurors deliberated two and a half days before returning their verdict. The trial followed a nearly four-year investigation triggered by a series of Times reports on Freeman's financial practices.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
In a case with significant ramifications, the Los Angeles Homecare Workers Union sued Los Angeles County in Superior Court on Thursday, seeking to establish that the county is the employer of the 40,000 in-home support service workers in the county. The union, affiliated with Local 434 of the Service Employees International Union, has been organizing the homecare workers since October and says it has already obtained authorization cards from more than 10,000 workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Personal data for more than 700,000 people who provide or receive home care for the elderly and disabled may have been compromised when a shipment of payroll data went missing on Wednesday, according to an internal government email obtained by the Los Angeles Times. The state learned of the breach on Wednesday, the email said. Hewlett Packard, which handles the payroll information for workers in California's In-Home Supportive Services program, told officials that the data disappeared when it was being shipped in the mail to a state office in Riverside.
HEALTH
October 20, 2003 | Trudy Lieberman, Special to The Times
Finding good home health care for a parent is much like finding day care for a child: You first rely on word-of-mouth to collect names of possible caregivers and then go through a lot of trial and error until you get the right one. Families often make mistakes in choosing a home health aide. I know our family did.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After ballots are counted Thursday, an estimated 74,000 Los Angeles County home-care workers, the people who dress, bathe and feed the county's elderly and disabled for $5.75 an hour, are likely to have a union. The mail-in vote follows a decade-long organizing drive by the Service Employees International Union that, if successful, will significantly boost labor's share of public employees in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | From Times staff reports
About 100 home-care workers protested outside the county Hall of Administration during a Board of Supervisors' budget hearing Tuesday, demanding recognition of their union so they can begin collective bargaining. Members of the United Domestic Workers of America AFL-CIO said they earn about $6.44 an hour caring for clients of the county's Social Services Agency, yet have no job benefits, said Sandra Gonzalez-Castro, a union organizer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1988 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
At 37, Linda Knipps' life as a quadriplegic revolves around a respirator and ventilation system that accompanies her 24 hours a day providing a steady mixture of saline and medication and pressurized air that Knipps needs to survive. Also at her side, virtually around the clock, is a young El Salvadoran named Ana Maria, a home-care worker who not only assists Knipps in her use and maintenance of the respirator but in her day-to-day living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2010 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday called the state's inability to stop scores of convicted felons from working in its home healthcare program a "public safety crisis" and demanded that lawmakers take action to address the situation. The governor made his comments in a letter to legislative leaders after The Times reported that people convicted of such crimes as rape, murder and elder abuse are paid to provide services for some of the most vulnerable Californians in their residences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2002 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caprice Kelton doesn't consider herself a labor activist. Even though she's on the front lines of a countywide campaign to unionize low-paid home-care aides like herself, hers is a labor of love rather than a working-class crusade. Kelton provides full-time care to her 63-year-old mother, who decades ago was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Kelton gets her mother up in the morning and puts her to bed each night.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
President Obama circumvented Congress and moved Thursday to require that home-care aides be paid minimum wage and overtime, giving the fast-growing workforce long-sought assistance. Home-care workers, who now number close to 2 million people, have been exempted from federal labor law since 1974. And although many states, including California, Illinois and Maryland, have rules guaranteeing home-care workers minimum wage, overtime, or both, 29 states do not offer these protections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2010 | By Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday called the state's inability to stop scores of convicted felons from working in its home healthcare program a "public safety crisis" and demanded that lawmakers take action to address the situation. The governor made his comments in a letter to legislative leaders after The Times reported that people convicted of such crimes as rape, murder and elder abuse are paid to provide services for some of the most vulnerable Californians in their residences.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court agreed Friday to referee a high school sports dispute over whether coaches have a free-speech right to recruit athletes from other schools. Last year, a federal appeals court threw out a $3,000 fine and a two-year suspension given to a Tennessee high school football powerhouse whose coach was accused of violating the state's anti-recruiting rule, which is similar to regulations around the country.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2005 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
A sprawling union local representing more than 100,000 home-care workers in Southern California has paid $8 million to settle claims that some workers it represented were overcharged in dues. Service Employees International Union Local 434B mailed checks this week averaging less than $100 each to 97,000 claimants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2004 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
As pay raises go, this one doesn't seem like much. Starting Wednesday, Ventura home-care worker Margaret Riggins will see her hourly pay increase by 89 cents. That comes to less than $20 a month for the time she spends caring for her elderly mother. But for Riggins, who is among 2,000 home-care aides in Ventura County who recently won their first labor contract, the bump in pay represents a big-time breakthrough.
HEALTH
October 20, 2003 | Trudy Lieberman, Special to The Times
Finding good home health care for a parent is much like finding day care for a child: You first rely on word-of-mouth to collect names of possible caregivers and then go through a lot of trial and error until you get the right one. Families often make mistakes in choosing a home health aide. I know our family did.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | S.J. DIAMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some good may yet come from the spectacle of government in complete disarray over the question of illegal domestic employees. It may eventually lead to some reform, although proposals--ranging from new laws on home-care workers to the age-old idea of indentured servitude--are in the preliminary stage. First, the prime candidates for attorney general collapsed. Then came a great melee of announcements from high officials, including Cabinet secretaries and legislators.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Ruben Castaneda of City of Commerce was working late one night when he tried to lift two heavy pails of ink and herniated five disks in his back. The 1995 injury touched off a series of operations that has dramatically changed his life and the life of his wife, Susan. Ruben couldn't be left alone after the surgeries, Susan said. He was in constant pain, and though determined to do things for himself, he'd fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
More than 1,800 home-care aides in Ventura County could be in line for significant pay raises following action by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday to serve as their employer of record. The workers currently earn $7.11 an hour as independent contractors for the state. But they are expected to unionize soon and begin bargaining for better wages and benefits. Labor leaders said their goal is to push the workers' pay up to $9.50 an hour and to secure health benefits for them.
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