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Homecoming Queen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Abby Sewell
The selection Friday of a transgender teen as the homecoming queen of a Huntington Beach High School was seen by some on the campus as a sign of progress. “We're proud the message from the home of the Vikings has been one of equity, acceptance, tolerance and respect,” Principal Morrow said. Cassidy Lynn Campbell broke down in tears Friday night when she learned that she had been crowned homecoming queen. "I was so proud to win, not just for me but for everyone out there," Cassidy told reporters afterward.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A transgender teenager who was named homecoming queen at her Orange County high school Friday night was overwhelmed by negative comments directed at her shortly after the victory, she confessed in a YouTube video. In the video, Cassidy Lynn Campbell, a senior at Marina High School in Huntington Beach, said she put herself up for the title because she hoped to make a statement and draw attention to the push for equality for transgender people. In doing so, she also became part of a small but growing movement of transgender teens nationwide entering competitions for traditional honors such as homecoming and prom king and queen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer
The mother of a transgender teenager who was named homecoming queen at Marina High in Huntington Beach on Friday said she's proud and amazed at what her daughter achieved. Cassidy Lynn Campbell, a  Marina High senior, said she put herself up for the title because she hoped to make a statement and draw attention to the push for equality for transgender people. She also became part of a small but growing movement of transgender teens nationwide entering competitions for traditional honors such as homecoming and prom king and queen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Steve Marble
A transgender teen who was cheered by students and parents when she was named homecoming queen at a Huntington Beach high school said she later wondered whether it was “even worth it.” In an emotional, nearly nine-minute YouTube video, Cassidy Lynn Campbell said she was hurt and stunned by the negative and hateful comments directed at her after her victory. Campbell, still wearing her tiara and homecoming sash in the recording, said the attacks made her feel like “going back to being miserable” and that perhaps she should “just be a boy and hate myself again … just so everyone can shut up and leave me alone.” In an interview with The Times after her victory, Campbell said she ran for homecoming queen to make a statement about equality for transgender people and was heartened by the response from students, her parents and school administrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Adolfo Flores
Cassidy Lynn Campbell broke down in tears Friday night when she learned that she had been crowned homecoming queen. The senior at Marina High School in Huntington Beach was born male but told The Times she always felt like a girl. In high school, she began taking hormone blockers and estrogen injections prescribed by an endocrinologist and made the transition to living as a girl. She decided to run for homecoming queen, in part, to make a statement. Photos: Being a girl every day "If I win it would mean that the school recognizes me as the gender I always felt I was," Cassidy, 16, told The Times before the election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
On Friday, a high school transgender senior in Huntington Beach will learn whether she will become one of five finalists for homecoming queen. It's a quest that first swept through Cassidy Campbell's mind last year, but she pushed the impulse aside. It would just be a joke, she told herself. Now the senior sees it as a chance to make a statement. At Marina High's homecoming pep rally Friday, the field of 10 homecoming queen candidates will be narrowed to five. Hours later, the queen will be crowned at the school's football game.
NEWS
June 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
For the first time, San Leandro High School has a black homecoming queen. But the yearbook failed to carry her homecoming photo, leading to a $250,000 claim and allegations of racial bias. In addition to the money, January Cooper, 18, wants the school to reissue the yearbook to include the omitted photo. "I didn't want to believe it," she said this week. Cooper said she was "about to start crying" when she first saw the publication in mid-June. "I left school and came home," she said.
SPORTS
October 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
Potomac High's kicker made six of six extra-point tries and was crowned homecoming queen--all at the same game. Cheryl Zimmermann, her football team's co-captain and kicker, had to be pulled out of the locker room to accept her tiara and roses during halftime ceremonies Friday night. The 5-foot-6, 112-pound senior was told just before halftime that she had been selected by the school's students as homecoming queen. Her coach escorted her from the locker room to midfield for the ceremonies.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, Dottie Thompson was just another face on a poster with six other beautiful women competing for homecoming queen of Cerritos Community College. Today, the 67-year-old mother of six and grandmother of 11 reigns supreme as queen of the 18,000-student campus. The Downey woman, who decided to go back to school after more than 30 years as a full-time homemaker, was crowned Oct. 24 during half time at the homecoming football game with Long Beach City College.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been more than 15 years since Goldie Glitters' last fleeting brush with acclaim. The Venice man attracted a few days of media attention in 1975, when he was elected Santa Monica College's first and only male homecoming queen. Some spectators threw eggs at Glitters' coronation, and football players threatened to boycott the second half of the homecoming game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer
The mother of a transgender teenager who was named homecoming queen at Marina High in Huntington Beach on Friday said she's proud and amazed at what her daughter achieved. Cassidy Lynn Campbell, a  Marina High senior, said she put herself up for the title because she hoped to make a statement and draw attention to the push for equality for transgender people. She also became part of a small but growing movement of transgender teens nationwide entering competitions for traditional honors such as homecoming and prom king and queen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2013 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
A transgender teenager who was named homecoming queen at Marina High in Huntington Beach said she is dealing with both praise and criticism this weekend. "It seemed like a dream," Cassidy Lynn Campbell said. "I just think it is such a huge step for the transgender community. The majority at my school wanted me to win. So many people embraced me and accept me for who I am. I think that is pretty profound. " The Marina High senior said she put herself up for the title because she hoped to make a statement and draw attention to the push for equality for transgender people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Adolfo Flores
The principal at Marina High School in Huntington Beach had made a vow before one of his students - a transgender teen - was crowned homecoming queen Friday night. "If Marina High School is to make high-profile news during its homecoming week this year," Principal Paul Morrow said before the ceremony, "then we are proud that the message is one of equity and individual respect. " Cassidy Lynn Campbell, who was born male but told The Times she always felt like a girl, broke down in tears during the homecoming ceremony at the school's football game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Abby Sewell
The selection Friday of a transgender teen as the homecoming queen of a Huntington Beach High School was seen by some on the campus as a sign of progress. “We're proud the message from the home of the Vikings has been one of equity, acceptance, tolerance and respect,” Principal Morrow said. Cassidy Lynn Campbell broke down in tears Friday night when she learned that she had been crowned homecoming queen. "I was so proud to win, not just for me but for everyone out there," Cassidy told reporters afterward.
OPINION
September 21, 2013
Re "In the running, as herself," Sept. 19 Transgender teen Cassidy Lynn Campbell would get my vote for homecoming queen at Marina High School. Not only is she beautiful, she is smart, brave and true to herself. Kudos to Marina High and her parents for allowing her to be who she is. Marsha Pasarow Schiff Los Angeles ALSO: Mailbag: Fight over food stamps Letters: Obamacare and public opinion Letters: Back-and-forth on Syria policy
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
When Cassidy Lynn Campbell woke up on Saturday morning she ambled to her bedroom mirror and took a long, astonished look at herself. "I was just thinking, what happened last night, what happened?" said the brown-haired 16-year-old. "It's so crazy that I actually won. " On Friday night Cassidy was named homecoming queen at Marina High in Huntington Beach, an event that wouldn't normally get much attention if not for a single fact: Cassidy was born a boy but now lives as a transgender girl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She walked down the red carpet with more of a determined stride than a regal glide. And her shoes resembled white sneakers more than glass slippers. But Amanda Arthur was very much the people's princess Saturday night as she was crowned homecoming queen of Newport Harbor High School, to the cheers and tears of hundreds.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | from Associated Press
A college student who was once her county's Dairy Princess faces life in prison after being convicted of murder for strangling a former homecoming queen in a quarrel over a man they both dated. Jurors deliberated about 7 1/2 hours before returning the verdict against 20-year-old Lori Esker about midnight Thursday. Prosecutors had argued that she was obsessed with 26-year-old Bill Buss and plotted the Sept. 20 killing of Lisa Cihaski, his new girlfriend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Adolfo Flores
Cassidy Lynn Campbell broke down in tears Friday night when she learned that she had been crowned homecoming queen. The senior at Marina High School in Huntington Beach was born male but told The Times she always felt like a girl. In high school, she began taking hormone blockers and estrogen injections prescribed by an endocrinologist and made the transition to living as a girl. She decided to run for homecoming queen, in part, to make a statement. Photos: Being a girl every day "If I win it would mean that the school recognizes me as the gender I always felt I was," Cassidy, 16, told The Times before the election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
On Friday, a high school transgender senior in Huntington Beach will learn whether she will become one of five finalists for homecoming queen. It's a quest that first swept through Cassidy Campbell's mind last year, but she pushed the impulse aside. It would just be a joke, she told herself. Now the senior sees it as a chance to make a statement. At Marina High's homecoming pep rally Friday, the field of 10 homecoming queen candidates will be narrowed to five. Hours later, the queen will be crowned at the school's football game.
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