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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1999 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CNN's weather forecast these days includes the cloud conditions in Belgrade, so there must be a war on. Nearly a decade after the Gulf War that put it on the map, Cable News Network has the art of covering crises down to a science.
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MAGAZINE
September 24, 1995 | Mary Melton
Neither the city nor the county knows exactly how many still exist, and nobody has any idea where all of them are located. According to the city's General Services Department, the oneguy with a map retired several years ago, and he took it with him. And the only working one in the county appears to be on Catalina, which uses it to call out the volunteer fire department.
MAGAZINE
April 9, 1995 | Judy Sims
Just a few years ago, sunflowers were pretty much what they'd always been: tall, rangy heliotropes grown mainly for seeds and oil and the occasional country plot. Beyond that, in florist and garden shops certainly, sunflowers were largely unwanted. Then they became a hot motif on the fashion and design scene, breaking ground for the sudden popularity of the real thing. The former wallflower is now the belle of the bed.
MAGAZINE
February 12, 1995 | Sharon Whitley
It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that too many high school girls don't understand the pitfalls of parenthood. But it was just such a guy who came up with a way to get the message across. Rick Jurmain, who had worked for McDonnell Douglas at the Johnson Space Center in Houston and at General Dynamics in San Diego, was one of thousands of laid-off aerospace engineers in 1993 when he spotted a TV show on a teen-pregnancy prevention program.
MAGAZINE
February 5, 1995 | Duke Helfand
Patsy Barggern has flouted the law, spent tens of thousands on lawyers and nearly wound up on jail-all for a fence. A tall fence. A fence her next-door neighbor hated because it blacked his view of slme shrubs. A fence she love because it blacked his view of her. Barggern says her neighbor, 79-year-old George Boucher, often watched her as she puttered around her Long Beach back yard, an accusation the retired doctor flatly denied. "She keeps saying I'm sexually attracted to her," he says.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 1994 | Sharon Whitley \f7
Like most parents, Marilyn Noonan of La Jolla constantly worried about her four young boys when they played in the street. "I used to be horrified to watch cars speed down my street," she says. "We tried begging, pleading, asking my neighbors to watch out for the kids, but they would forget." Noonan knew that there was no way she could keep the kids contained in a yard. "We're trying to deal with reality.
MAGAZINE
April 24, 1994 | Jill Stewart
Pity poor Herschel Elkins. As state senior assistant attorney general, he's got a lot of important stuff to worry about but he keeps having to investigate California homeowners who want to raffle off their homes like prizes at a pancake dinner. Ever since a couple in Maine sold an inn by hawking tickets last year, dozens of Californians have tried to do the same. But there are countless problems with such schemes, says Elkins, including the fact that they're usually illegal and they don't work.
MAGAZINE
January 30, 1994 | Sharon Tetrault
For more than a year, Jeanette Elkins lived in the exclusive, guarded development of Big Canyon in Newport Beach. The sprawling, country-style abode she called home was not hers, but at just $200 a month, she had no complaints. "It allowed me to send money to my daughter who is in college and to put away $1,000 in savings every month," says Elkins.
MAGAZINE
June 27, 1993 | Martin Booe
Your mom told you some great yarns about her wild days in the WAVES. And your dad really was a war hero. Too bad your own kids are so young; they should really hear those stories from the source, not from your own sketchy memories of their accounts. Well, at least three L.A.-area production companies can ease the burden of history by making video documentaries from senior family members' remembrances of things past. But one's elders may not gladly suffer confessions on camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Former heavyweight champion George Foreman, three stand-up comedians and a new police show from Steven Bochco are featured on the fall, prime-time lineup that ABC announced Monday. But gone from the schedule will be the critically acclaimed one-hour drama "Life Goes On," which viewers tried to bring back with a letter-writing campaign. Two other high-profile dramas, "Homefront" and "Civil Wars," were also canceled.
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