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Homegirl Cafe

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FOOD
June 15, 2005
I read this article [Delightful Dishes With a Mission," June 8] at 6 this morning, and by 10 a.m. a friend and I were enjoying some of the best food we've ever had. "Angela's green potion" tastes like a summer morning. Parking wasn't a problem, Everyone was friendly; every meal looked great. I intend to be a regular at the Homegirl Cafe. Joanne Gonzalez Claremont
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | STEVE LOPEZ
It was Father Gregory Boyle's first invitation to address the Los Angeles Police Commission, and he had something to get off his chest. For a quarter of a century, Boyle has steered boys and girls, and men and women, out of the gang life through Homeboy Industries, which offers job training, counseling, tattoo removal and more. The model Boyle built has been replicated around the country and abroad. Here in Los Angeles, some 120,000 gang members have voluntarily asked Father Boyle for help starting over.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2007 | Mindy Farabee
'Mija, how old are you?" manager Patricia Zarate calls out across Homegirl Cafe's new dining room in downtown L.A. "Nineteen," Alma Cova, a petite mother with cat eyes, tosses back as she whips up a late breakfast for an assortment of city hall staffers, downtown professionals, families and neighborhood denizens. One of the first hires when the cafe opened this past October, Cova arrived with few honed skills. Two months later, Zarate is still amazed: "I had no idea how talented she was."
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
USC will be hosting a fair food bazaar featuring a panel discussion and lunch on Friday. Throughout  “ Just Food and Fair Food: A Multidisciplinary Exploration ,” which is free and open to the public, speakers will address access to nutritious food, or a lack thereof, in low-income communities on a national, regional and local level. Paula Daniels, senior advisor to the mayor of Los Angeles on sustainable food and water policy, who also founded the Los Angeles Food Policy Council , will moderate the discussion, which will be held at the University Park Campus' Doheny Memorial Library from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sitting on the panel will be Oran Hesterman , author of "Fair Food: Growing a Healthy, Sustainable Food System for All"; Robert Gottlieb , co-author of "Food Justice" and director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College; Luz Calvo, professor of ethnic studies at California State East Bay; LaVonna Lewis, a public policy professor at USC who teaches food policy; and Sarah Portnoy, a professor in the Spanish department at USC who teaches Hispanic culinary culture in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2005 | Kurt Streeter, Times Staff Writer
A note on the text Quotations in this story are designated in two ways: Those heard by the writer are enclosed in quotation marks. Those recalled by others in interviews are designated by slashes. * [Unpublished Note: The italics may not display depending upon the archiving system you are using.] * On the street, they could be enemies. One has a tattoo, "Chicana Pride," stitched across her neck. The other holds a knife. They are from different gangs. The two young women glare at each other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
With tattoos up and down his arms, a long black ponytail and an even longer criminal record, Alex Renteria isn't like most people in this building. Before this job, he had done only one kind of work: "slinging dope and stealing. " Now, he slings tamales and fresh-baked pastries at a bright diner at City Hall. Homeboy Diner, which opened this week, is the latest business venture of Homeboy Industries, a Los Angeles institution that supporters say has helped thousands of gang members quit lives of crime with counseling, tattoo removal and job training.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
USC will be hosting a fair food bazaar featuring a panel discussion and lunch on Friday. Throughout  “ Just Food and Fair Food: A Multidisciplinary Exploration ,” which is free and open to the public, speakers will address access to nutritious food, or a lack thereof, in low-income communities on a national, regional and local level. Paula Daniels, senior advisor to the mayor of Los Angeles on sustainable food and water policy, who also founded the Los Angeles Food Policy Council , will moderate the discussion, which will be held at the University Park Campus' Doheny Memorial Library from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sitting on the panel will be Oran Hesterman , author of "Fair Food: Growing a Healthy, Sustainable Food System for All"; Robert Gottlieb , co-author of "Food Justice" and director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College; Luz Calvo, professor of ethnic studies at California State East Bay; LaVonna Lewis, a public policy professor at USC who teaches food policy; and Sarah Portnoy, a professor in the Spanish department at USC who teaches Hispanic culinary culture in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2014 | STEVE LOPEZ
It was Father Gregory Boyle's first invitation to address the Los Angeles Police Commission, and he had something to get off his chest. For a quarter of a century, Boyle has steered boys and girls, and men and women, out of the gang life through Homeboy Industries, which offers job training, counseling, tattoo removal and more. The model Boyle built has been replicated around the country and abroad. Here in Los Angeles, some 120,000 gang members have voluntarily asked Father Boyle for help starting over.
FOOD
June 8, 2005 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
Homegirl Cafe is the most intriguing new Mexican restaurant I've stumbled into lately. Stumble is the right word too, because this pretty little cafe with a special mission is on 1st Street in Boyle Heights, where construction of a new Metro station has created traffic and parking hassles. But there's a reason to make your way through the construction chaos to the tiny storefront with the bright yellow walls.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Homegirl salsa is about to find a home at the deli counter of Ralphs Grocery Co. Salsa made by women in Homeboy Industries' Homegirl Cafe & Catering job training program will be sold at the chain's downtown Los Angeles store starting today. It is part of an initiative by Ralphs to help the L.A. gang-intervention agency learn how to commercialize its products. "Finding commercial outlets for our food products will allow us to generate more revenue, employ more people and do more job training, said Mary Ellen Burton, chief financial officer of Homeboy Industries Inc., which operates the Homegirl Cafe, a landscaping business and a silk screen shop as part of its efforts to steer younger residents in some of the city's toughest neighborhoods from gang life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
With tattoos up and down his arms, a long black ponytail and an even longer criminal record, Alex Renteria isn't like most people in this building. Before this job, he had done only one kind of work: "slinging dope and stealing. " Now, he slings tamales and fresh-baked pastries at a bright diner at City Hall. Homeboy Diner, which opened this week, is the latest business venture of Homeboy Industries, a Los Angeles institution that supporters say has helped thousands of gang members quit lives of crime with counseling, tattoo removal and job training.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Homegirl salsa is about to find a home at the deli counter of Ralphs Grocery Co. Salsa made by women in Homeboy Industries' Homegirl Cafe & Catering job training program will be sold at the chain's downtown Los Angeles store starting today. It is part of an initiative by Ralphs to help the L.A. gang-intervention agency learn how to commercialize its products. "Finding commercial outlets for our food products will allow us to generate more revenue, employ more people and do more job training, said Mary Ellen Burton, chief financial officer of Homeboy Industries Inc., which operates the Homegirl Cafe, a landscaping business and a silk screen shop as part of its efforts to steer younger residents in some of the city's toughest neighborhoods from gang life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2007 | Mindy Farabee
'Mija, how old are you?" manager Patricia Zarate calls out across Homegirl Cafe's new dining room in downtown L.A. "Nineteen," Alma Cova, a petite mother with cat eyes, tosses back as she whips up a late breakfast for an assortment of city hall staffers, downtown professionals, families and neighborhood denizens. One of the first hires when the cafe opened this past October, Cova arrived with few honed skills. Two months later, Zarate is still amazed: "I had no idea how talented she was."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2005 | Kurt Streeter, Times Staff Writer
A note on the text Quotations in this story are designated in two ways: Those heard by the writer are enclosed in quotation marks. Those recalled by others in interviews are designated by slashes. * [Unpublished Note: The italics may not display depending upon the archiving system you are using.] * On the street, they could be enemies. One has a tattoo, "Chicana Pride," stitched across her neck. The other holds a knife. They are from different gangs. The two young women glare at each other.
FOOD
June 15, 2005
I read this article [Delightful Dishes With a Mission," June 8] at 6 this morning, and by 10 a.m. a friend and I were enjoying some of the best food we've ever had. "Angela's green potion" tastes like a summer morning. Parking wasn't a problem, Everyone was friendly; every meal looked great. I intend to be a regular at the Homegirl Cafe. Joanne Gonzalez Claremont
FOOD
June 8, 2005 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
Homegirl Cafe is the most intriguing new Mexican restaurant I've stumbled into lately. Stumble is the right word too, because this pretty little cafe with a special mission is on 1st Street in Boyle Heights, where construction of a new Metro station has created traffic and parking hassles. But there's a reason to make your way through the construction chaos to the tiny storefront with the bright yellow walls.
OPINION
September 11, 2005
Thank you for the wonderful article on the Homegirl Cafe (Sept. 5). I had the great pleasure of eating there many times last spring while volunteering for Antonio Villaraigosa's mayoral campaign. The food and drinks were to die for, and the price was right. PETER AUERBACH Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2009 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Homegirl salsa is about to find a home at the deli counter of Ralphs Grocery Co. Salsa made by women in Homeboy Industries' Homegirl Cafe & Catering job training program will be sold at the chain's downtown Los Angeles store starting today. It is part of an initiative by Ralphs to help the L.A. gang-intervention agency learn how to commercialize its products. "Finding commercial outlets for our food products will allow us to generate more revenue, employ more people and do more job training, said Mary Ellen Burton, chief financial officer of Homeboy Industries Inc., which operates the Homegirl Cafe, a landscaping business and a silk screen shop as part of its efforts to steer younger residents in some of the city's toughest neighborhoods from gang life.
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