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November 23, 1999 | Leslie Earnest, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
Homegrocer.com, which opened its first California distribution center in Irvine in September, has expanded its online grocery delivery service throughout Orange County. The company opened another distribution center Wednesday in Fullerton to help provide countywide service. "The response has been wonderful," said Jon Landers, Homegrocer.com's vice president of marketing. "We get calls every day from people asking when are we going to expand to their areas."
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BUSINESS
October 17, 2000 | BRAD BERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
HomeGrocer.com won't be sending its signature peach-adorned grocery delivery vans from the big former Thrifty Payless distribution center near Baldwin Hills after all. HomeGrocer had signed a 15-year lease for the 380,000-square-foot complex at La Brea Avenue and Rodeo Road not long before the company was acquired in June by another fledgling online grocery delivery specialist, Foster City-based Webvan Group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000 | Kristiane M. Ridgway, (949) 764-4309
By adding alcohol to its list of home delivery products, Homegrocer.com has been forced to open its doors to on-site liquor sales. The company's new liquor license requires the grocery home delivery service to put up a 532-square-foot public sales counter to display and sell alcohol. The Irvine warehouse, at 10 Whatney, serves solely as a distribution site. "You order online and they deliver to your house," said Eric Rubery, consultant to the city.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | INDRANEEL SUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't hold your breath for that carton of milk and head of lettuce. Customers nationwide who use online grocer HomeGrocer.com were forced earlier this week to schedule their deliveries for as much as a day later than usual because a recent promotional campaign led to a surge in new orders that taxed the company's delivery channels, an executive of the Kirkland, Wash.-based site said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | Melinda Fulmer
Online grocers have been slow to tackle the Los Angeles market due to its spread-out customer base and shortage of sites for the big warehouses it requires. But now, one of e-commerce's hottest names is finally moving in. Kirkland, Wash.-based Homegrocer.com recently leased two distribution facilities--one on Foothill Boulevard in Azusa and another on La Brea Avenue in Los Angeles--with hopes of delivering to much of the Southland in coming months, company officials say. Homegrocer.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1999 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A service that corner grocery stores provided in the decades before World War II is coming back to life courtesy of the Internet: home-delivered groceries. The proportion of people receiving home deliveries is rising sharply. In 1929, 13.8% of all food was delivered to the home, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That fell to 1% by 1986. This year, about 2.6% of all food will be delivered to the home, and the figure is expected to continue rising in coming years. HomeGrocer.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST and MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As soon as HomeGrocer.com Inc. started service in Southern California last fall, Michele Glasky placed her order online. And the Irvine mother of two couldn't have been happier. Even the bananas, she said, were delivered just the way she likes them--a tad on the green side. But lately she's reverted to in-store shopping because she doesn't want to wait for deliveries. Beth Mueller, a 30-year-old money-market trader in San Francisco, describes her experience with online grocer Webvan as "awesome."
BUSINESS
March 19, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST and MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As soon as HomeGrocer.com Inc. started service in Southern California last fall, Michele Glasky placed her order online. And the Irvine mother of two couldn't have been happier. Even the bananas, she said, were delivered just the way she likes them--a tad on the green side. But lately she's reverted to in-store shopping because she doesn't want to wait for deliveries. Beth Mueller, a 30-year-old money-market trader in San Francisco, describes her experience with online grocer Webvan as "awesome."
BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | (Times Staff and Wire Services)
HomeGrocer.com Inc. rolled out its service to Orange County on Monday, making it the second online grocer in the market. The Bellevue, Wash.-based company, which has financial backing from several high-powered firms, including a $35-million investment from Amazon.com Inc., will deliver groceries to homes in 44 ZIP Codes, mostly in Orange County. The company figures to provide formidable competition for the other local online grocery service, Aliso Viejo-based whyrunout.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2000 | INDRANEEL SUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't hold your breath for that carton of milk and head of lettuce. Customers nationwide who use online grocer HomeGrocer.com were forced earlier this week to schedule their deliveries for as much as a day later than usual because a recent promotional campaign led to a surge in new orders that taxed the company's delivery channels, an executive of the Kirkland, Wash.-based site said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the nation's largest online grocers announced Monday plans to combine in an attempt to accelerate their expansion plans and compete more effectively with bricks-and-mortar supermarket chains. Foster City, Calif.-based Webvan Group Inc. agreed to buy rival HomeGrocer.com Inc., which entered the Los Angeles market in January, for about $1.2 billion in stock. The deal would allow Webvan, which operates in only three U.S.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2000 | Associated Press
The co-founder and president of online grocery delivery service HomeGrocer.com started a four-month sabbatical this month, weeks after taking the company public. Terry Drayton cited the physical and emotional exhaustion caused by the four-year push to form the business, find investors and launch the delivery service in 1998. Shares in Kirkland, Wash.-based HomeGrocer closed unchanged at $5.50 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HomeGrocer.com Inc. expected a stiff battle in cyberspace when it rolled into Orange County, but some of its toughest challenges so far have been on the real streets. A quirk in California's liquor law, for instance, is forcing HomeGrocer to open a mini-store in its warehouses in Irvine, Fullerton and Azusa so that it can sell liquor online. The state law says that anyone who wants to sell liquor must have a tangible site where the public can see and buy the product.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST and MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As soon as HomeGrocer.com Inc. started service in Southern California last fall, Michele Glasky placed her order online. And the Irvine mother of two couldn't have been happier. Even the bananas, she said, were delivered just the way she likes them--a tad on the green side. But lately she's reverted to in-store shopping because she doesn't want to wait for deliveries. Beth Mueller, a 30-year-old money-market trader in San Francisco, describes her experience with online grocer Webvan as "awesome."
BUSINESS
March 19, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST and MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As soon as HomeGrocer.com Inc. started service in Southern California last fall, Michele Glasky placed her order online. And the Irvine mother of two couldn't have been happier. Even the bananas, she said, were delivered just the way she likes them--a tad on the green side. But lately she's reverted to in-store shopping because she doesn't want to wait for deliveries. Beth Mueller, a 30-year-old money-market trader in San Francisco, describes her experience with online grocer Webvan as "awesome."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000 | Kristiane M. Ridgway, (949) 764-4309
By adding alcohol to its list of home delivery products, Homegrocer.com has been forced to open its doors to on-site liquor sales. The company's new liquor license requires the grocery home delivery service to put up a 532-square-foot public sales counter to display and sell alcohol. The Irvine warehouse, at 10 Whatney, serves solely as a distribution site. "You order online and they deliver to your house," said Eric Rubery, consultant to the city.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2000 | Associated Press
The co-founder and president of online grocery delivery service HomeGrocer.com started a four-month sabbatical this month, weeks after taking the company public. Terry Drayton cited the physical and emotional exhaustion caused by the four-year push to form the business, find investors and launch the delivery service in 1998. Shares in Kirkland, Wash.-based HomeGrocer closed unchanged at $5.50 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2000 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HomeGrocer.com Inc. expected a stiff battle in cyberspace when it rolled into Orange County, but some of its toughest challenges so far have been on the real streets. A quirk in California's liquor law, for instance, is forcing HomeGrocer to open a mini-store in its warehouses in Irvine, Fullerton and Azusa so that it can sell liquor online. The state law says that anyone who wants to sell liquor must have a tangible site where the public can see and buy the product.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | Melinda Fulmer
Online grocers have been slow to tackle the Los Angeles market due to its spread-out customer base and shortage of sites for the big warehouses it requires. But now, one of e-commerce's hottest names is finally moving in. Kirkland, Wash.-based Homegrocer.com recently leased two distribution facilities--one on Foothill Boulevard in Azusa and another on La Brea Avenue in Los Angeles--with hopes of delivering to much of the Southland in coming months, company officials say. Homegrocer.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1999 | Leslie Earnest, Leslie Earnest covers retail businesses for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7832 and at leslie.earnest@latimes.com
Homegrocer.com, which opened its first California distribution center in Irvine in September, has expanded its online grocery delivery service throughout Orange County. The company opened another distribution center Wednesday in Fullerton to help provide countywide service. "The response has been wonderful," said Jon Landers, Homegrocer.com's vice president of marketing. "We get calls every day from people asking when are we going to expand to their areas."
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