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Homeless Adults

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1985 | KEVIN RODERICK and JANET CLAYTON, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, under growing pressure to do something for homeless people living on downtown streets, has given his approval to the city's first temporary Skid Row shelter, a project to be hastily erected starting next weekend on vacant city land.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2012 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
An ambitious program to provide permanent housing to some of Los Angeles County's most hard-core homeless more than paid for itself, yielding a net savings of $238,700 over two years, officials said Thursday. The long-awaited findings, presented to a countywide panel on homelessness, support a growing consensus across the country that getting the most entrenched street dwellers into permanent homes and providing them the services they need to stay off the streets can save municipalities money.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2012 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
An ambitious program to provide permanent housing to some of Los Angeles County's most hard-core homeless more than paid for itself, yielding a net savings of $238,700 over two years, officials said Thursday. The long-awaited findings, presented to a countywide panel on homelessness, support a growing consensus across the country that getting the most entrenched street dwellers into permanent homes and providing them the services they need to stay off the streets can save municipalities money.
OPINION
December 25, 2008
Re "They're living with cancer and little else," Column, Dec. 21 As Steve Lopez has discovered, homelessness is never as simple as a string of bad luck. An expert on homelessness once explained to me that the saying "one paycheck away from the streets" was very misleading. Most citizens would not become homeless, even if we were unemployed for a year. Why? Because we have resources, both external (savings, insurance, credit cards, friends, family, alumni associations, co-workers)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1992
In response to "Cutbacks Push Poor to the Edge," April 2: The most devastating attack on the poor in decades is progressing virtually without notice. Though we have heard much about the governor's proposal for deep cuts in aid to poor women with dependent children, that is surpassed by what is happening to homeless adults. There is only one government aid program left that provides emergency assistance to homeless adults. The governor's welfare initiative, plus two bills now progressing through the state Legislature (AB 2901 and SB 1556)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997
A onetime Hollywood eyesore has been transformed into a 54-unit housing development for homeless adults with mental disabilities. The renovated building will be opened today at a 1 p.m. ceremony. The Gower Street Apartments, which for years had been in disrepair and vacant, now sports a festive decor of gold, turquoise and pink. Residents of the complex at 1140 N. Gower St. will be able to acquire mental health care, crisis intervention and vocational services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2008 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
It's known in many circles as a "quiet crisis" -- a surging population of older Americans over the next 15 years. And for those who serve the homeless in Los Angeles, that portends a dramatically worsening situation. The nonprofit Shelter Partnership spent the last two years studying the plight of Los Angeles County's homeless elderly -- a population, it concluded, of 3,000 to 4,000. The study, which is being released today, marks the first time that the region's elderly homeless population has been studied.
OPINION
December 7, 2003
Re "Shelter With Open Arms Faces City With Firm Hand," Nov. 27: After reading the article about Dwight's House, the Catholic Worker shelter in Santa Ana that may soon be shut down, my daughter and I were motivated to help out in our own small way. We cleaned out our closets and delivered a load of clothing to the shelter operated by Dwight and Leia Smith. On our brief visit, we got a glimpse of how the Smiths and the other volunteers assist the adults and families who have fallen through the cracks into homelessness.
NEWS
May 7, 2001
More people slept at Ventura County warming shelters this winter than at any other time in the past five years, underscoring the need for permanent shelters, advocates say. Before winter emergency shelters closed in March, advocates estimated the county's total number of homeless people at more than 3,000, a substantial increase from last year's estimate of 1,300. Volunteers surveyed 295 homeless adults at the county's seven shelters on the night of Feb. 22. Highlights from that report, released last week: One-third of the shelter population were women and children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
After a year of planning and two months of renovation, Henderson House, the city's first shelter for the transitionally homeless, has reopened its doors. About 20 people are expected to move into the renovated 45-bed shelter this week, said Mike Lennon, executive director for HomeAid, the nonprofit organization that oversaw the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2008 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
It's known in many circles as a "quiet crisis" -- a surging population of older Americans over the next 15 years. And for those who serve the homeless in Los Angeles, that portends a dramatically worsening situation. The nonprofit Shelter Partnership spent the last two years studying the plight of Los Angeles County's homeless elderly -- a population, it concluded, of 3,000 to 4,000. The study, which is being released today, marks the first time that the region's elderly homeless population has been studied.
OPINION
December 7, 2003
Re "Shelter With Open Arms Faces City With Firm Hand," Nov. 27: After reading the article about Dwight's House, the Catholic Worker shelter in Santa Ana that may soon be shut down, my daughter and I were motivated to help out in our own small way. We cleaned out our closets and delivered a load of clothing to the shelter operated by Dwight and Leia Smith. On our brief visit, we got a glimpse of how the Smiths and the other volunteers assist the adults and families who have fallen through the cracks into homelessness.
NEWS
May 7, 2001
More people slept at Ventura County warming shelters this winter than at any other time in the past five years, underscoring the need for permanent shelters, advocates say. Before winter emergency shelters closed in March, advocates estimated the county's total number of homeless people at more than 3,000, a substantial increase from last year's estimate of 1,300. Volunteers surveyed 295 homeless adults at the county's seven shelters on the night of Feb. 22. Highlights from that report, released last week: One-third of the shelter population were women and children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997
A onetime Hollywood eyesore has been transformed into a 54-unit housing development for homeless adults with mental disabilities. The renovated building will be opened today at a 1 p.m. ceremony. The Gower Street Apartments, which for years had been in disrepair and vacant, now sports a festive decor of gold, turquoise and pink. Residents of the complex at 1140 N. Gower St. will be able to acquire mental health care, crisis intervention and vocational services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
After a year of planning and two months of renovation, Henderson House, the city's first shelter for the transitionally homeless, has reopened its doors. About 20 people are expected to move into the renovated 45-bed shelter this week, said Mike Lennon, executive director for HomeAid, the nonprofit organization that oversaw the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To Los Angeles City Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg, a new facility serving homeless adults is just what Hollywood needs. To many of her constituents, Hollywood needs almost anything but. Goldberg has thrown her support behind a proposed center in central Hollywood that would offer counseling, job training and housing referrals to homeless adults. While the area has a number of organizations catering to street youth, there are few facilities serving adults, who make up an estimated 60% to 70% of the 9,500 homeless in Hollywood.
OPINION
December 25, 2008
Re "They're living with cancer and little else," Column, Dec. 21 As Steve Lopez has discovered, homelessness is never as simple as a string of bad luck. An expert on homelessness once explained to me that the saying "one paycheck away from the streets" was very misleading. Most citizens would not become homeless, even if we were unemployed for a year. Why? Because we have resources, both external (savings, insurance, credit cards, friends, family, alumni associations, co-workers)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1987
An editorial ("Helping the Homeless," Aug. 10) focused on the volunteer efforts of a physician from Florida who set up shop at the downtown campground one weekend last month. "It is unusual for doctors to spend their weekends helping the impoverished," the editorial said. "For years Los Angeles physicians have provided medical care for thousands of Mexico's poor. But this tented city was not in Mexico, nor was it in Ethiopia, India or Bangladesh. This was Los Angeles." "Why is Los Angeles," it continued, "unable to care for its homeless population without outside help?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To Los Angeles City Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg, a new facility serving homeless adults is just what Hollywood needs. To many of her constituents, Hollywood needs almost anything but. Goldberg has thrown her support behind a proposed center in central Hollywood that would offer counseling, job training and housing referrals to homeless adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994
Who are the homeless? Well, it can be pretty easy, these days, to be fed up with the subject. Perhaps it also seems as though the problem cannot be escaped. Not only do you have to endure that long commute home, there's someone at the freeway entrance, begging for money. Perhaps you barely notice their faces. Perhaps you resent the intrusion. Perhaps you just don't need someone else making you feel guilty.
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