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July 8, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cleiton, 12, used to steal from the stores in a shopping gallery near the center of Duque de Caxias, one of the grimy, violent suburbs on the sprawling northern outskirts of Rio de Janeiro. He belonged to the ragged legion of street kids who live by their wits and sometimes die by the gun. Cleiton's killers caught up with him one night last January as he slept on a sidewalk near the gallery. A boy called A.G., who knew Cleiton, tells the story in a few words. "He was sleeping," A.G.
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NEWS
June 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A former police officer convicted of murder in a shooting rampage in which eight street children died was declared innocent Thursday at his retrial. Nelson Oliveira dos Santos Cunha, 29, was sentenced in November to 261 years in jail on eight charges of murder and one of attempted murder in the 1993 incident. Under Brazilian law, anyone sentenced to more than 20 years in jail for a crime has the automatic right to a retrial. "This decision shames our society," said Rio Dist. Atty.
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NEWS
August 18, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it a model for programs worldwide, the Inter-American Development Bank and Brazilian officials launched a $20-million project Wednesday to aid this nation's growing and embarrassing number of neglected, homeless children. The nationwide program is a departure for the bank, which until a few years ago supported only transportation and energy projects. In recent years, the bank has branched into environmental programs, such as sewer construction and the cleanup of Rio's Guanabara Bay.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it a model for programs worldwide, the Inter-American Development Bank and Brazilian officials launched a $20-million project Wednesday to aid this nation's growing and embarrassing number of neglected, homeless children. The nationwide program is a departure for the bank, which until a few years ago supported only transportation and energy projects. In recent years, the bank has branched into environmental programs, such as sewer construction and the cleanup of Rio's Guanabara Bay.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A former police officer convicted of murder in a shooting rampage in which eight street children died was declared innocent Thursday at his retrial. Nelson Oliveira dos Santos Cunha, 29, was sentenced in November to 261 years in jail on eight charges of murder and one of attempted murder in the 1993 incident. Under Brazilian law, anyone sentenced to more than 20 years in jail for a crime has the automatic right to a retrial. "This decision shames our society," said Rio Dist. Atty.
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five men wielding revolvers opened fire on a group of street youths sleeping on a broad plaza in the heart of downtown Rio de Janeiro early Friday, killing seven. A 16-year-old boy, one of two who were wounded but survived, told police and reporters that the gunmen sped up to the square in a taxicab and a beige Chevette sedan, leaped to the pavement and without a word of warning fired at point-blank range into a group of about 30 youths.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of protesters rallied in Rio de Janeiro to demand justice in the deaths of seven street children shot to death as they slept outside a church. The downtown rally was originally called to mark the third anniversary of another incident in which 11 young people were shot to death in a Rio suburb. But the brutal deaths of the children in downtown Rio on Friday gave added meaning to the gathering.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city where an average of 30 people are shot, stabbed or beaten to death daily, murder is commonplace, but this one touched a particularly sensitive nerve: Jose Carlos Madeira Serrano, 64, the former director of the nation's Central Bank and the man once responsible for managing its foreign debt, had been shot in the back early Sunday in an attempted carjacking as he was dropping off two women at their downtown apartment.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city where an average of 30 people are shot, stabbed or beaten to death daily, murder is commonplace, but this one touched a particularly sensitive nerve: Jose Carlos Madeira Serrano, 64, the former director of the nation's Central Bank and the man once responsible for managing its foreign debt, had been shot in the back early Sunday in an attempted carjacking as he was dropping off two women at their downtown apartment.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of protesters rallied in Rio de Janeiro to demand justice in the deaths of seven street children shot to death as they slept outside a church. The downtown rally was originally called to mark the third anniversary of another incident in which 11 young people were shot to death in a Rio suburb. But the brutal deaths of the children in downtown Rio on Friday gave added meaning to the gathering.
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five men wielding revolvers opened fire on a group of street youths sleeping on a broad plaza in the heart of downtown Rio de Janeiro early Friday, killing seven. A 16-year-old boy, one of two who were wounded but survived, told police and reporters that the gunmen sped up to the square in a taxicab and a beige Chevette sedan, leaped to the pavement and without a word of warning fired at point-blank range into a group of about 30 youths.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cleiton, 12, used to steal from the stores in a shopping gallery near the center of Duque de Caxias, one of the grimy, violent suburbs on the sprawling northern outskirts of Rio de Janeiro. He belonged to the ragged legion of street kids who live by their wits and sometimes die by the gun. Cleiton's killers caught up with him one night last January as he slept on a sidewalk near the gallery. A boy called A.G., who knew Cleiton, tells the story in a few words. "He was sleeping," A.G.
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