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Homeless Northern California

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NEWS
June 12, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
A compromise agreement between clergymen and the Roseville Chamber of Commerce to resolve a bitter dispute over free meals for transients was rejected by the Roseville City Council by a 3-2 vote Wednesday. City officials and some merchants have complained that free meals offered by four church organizations are attracting increasing numbers of transients to the city of 50,000, a historic railroad town and longtime stopover for rail-riding hobos.
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NEWS
March 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
Authorities were concerned Monday that two men who gave cardiopulmonary resuscitation to a dying and bloody homeless man may have been exposed to the victim's HIV infection, which causes AIDS. Authorities issued an alert Monday for the two good Samaritans, who left the scene of the accident here after an ambulance crew took over. The men, who were not identified, contacted the Sonoma County Department of Public Health on Monday afternoon, said California Highway Patrol Officer Wayne Ziese.
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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city of Berkeley is developing a plan to set up "urban campsites" on vacant lots so homeless people can get off the streets and sleep in pup tents at city-run camps. Under the proposal, which must be approved by the City Council, authorities would supervise the camps, limit the number inhabitants and provide sanitation facilities. Officials hope to avoid problems that arose five years ago when police broke up a homeless encampment after a double killing, a fire and drunken brawls.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | ARMANDO ACUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Working to end homelessness . . . one cottage at a time." That is the slogan of a unique project tucked away on a desolate spit of industrial property a dozen blocks north of the state Capitol. There, on 2 1/2 acres by railroad tracks and century-old warehouses, is a village of 60 pastel-colored cottages, each smaller than a suburban two-car garage.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | ARMANDO ACUNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Working to end homelessness . . . one cottage at a time." That is the slogan of a unique project tucked away on a desolate spit of industrial property a dozen blocks north of the state Capitol. There, on 2 1/2 acres by railroad tracks and century-old warehouses, is a village of 60 pastel-colored cottages, each smaller than a suburban two-car garage.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER and Cathleen Decker reported from Los Angeles; Ashley Dunn, Tracey Kaplan, J. Michael Kennedy, Dean Murphy, Maria Newman, Louis Sahagun and Tracy Wilkinson from the Bay Area; Marita Hernandez from Watsonville, and Tina Daunt and Mary Lou Fulton from Whittier
With a last, longing look at a picture of her dead son, Beverly Godinez fled the earthquake-ravaged low-rent hotel she called home and joined the ranks of the Bay Area's homeless. Her home had made it through Tuesday's initial quake, but 23 hours later, a terse voice burst over the hotel intercom and ordered its residents out. She grabbed a few clothes and a few dollars and rushed outside with her husband, Ferman Malbrough. "I stared at that room and just felt lousy," Malbrough said.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost two months after Northern California's deadly 7.1-magnitude earthquake, more than 600 people in this small farming community are still living in tents in a city park, sleeping on cots in Red Cross shelters or spending nights in cars or on lawns behind their condemned houses. Many of those who became homeless after the quake are still waiting for federal relief officials to open temporary mobile home parks.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | DAN MORAIN and HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Art Agnos, the former social worker, has a term for it: compassion fatigue. People were weary of being hit up for spare change. Brown-bagging office workers resented seeing 200 homeless, derelict and otherwise lost souls pitch camp in a choice picnic ground under the olive trees across from City Hall. The Chamber of Commerce worried that Civic Center panhandlers were scaring off tourists and conventioneers.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Francisco-Oakland area may be the worst place in the nation for poor people to live because of its high housing costs, according to a report released Monday. The high costs are forcing poor households to spend excessive amounts of their limited incomes for shelter, the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities said. This forces the poor to divert money from other pressing needs, such as food, clothing and health care.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | DAN MORAIN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than two weeks after the Oct. 17 earthquake battered Northern California, more than 2,000 migrant workers, low-wage earners and poor pensioners remain homeless, living in tents and makeshift dormitories from the Salinas Valley to San Francisco's shabby Tenderloin. In upper-income areas like Los Gatos, near San Jose, and the Marina District of San Francisco, most residents have found housing, living in hotels, with friends or in rented quarters, authorities say.
NEWS
November 17, 1996 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boo!, as he calls himself, doesn't have shoes. "You get used to it," says the 27-year-old veteran traveler as he stands on the edge of the central plaza of Arcata. He also has no job. "I don't answer to a clock. I go where I want to go." He does, however, have a filthy, graffiti-stained station wagon--which at the moment is filled with fellow travelers and a steaming vat of oatmeal that Boo! commandeered from sympathetic donors. His hungry friends eat from tin bowls.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | MARIE GRAVELLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the sun sets on a chilly evening, two women steer a bicycle and a makeshift cart onto the grassy plaza in the center of this small college town. Their mission: Feed the homeless who gather in the plaza. Their problem: They have to break the law to do it in the public square. Arcata may be a bastion of liberal activism on California's rural North Coast, but even here tolerance for the homeless has its limits.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
A compromise agreement between clergymen and the Roseville Chamber of Commerce to resolve a bitter dispute over free meals for transients was rejected by the Roseville City Council by a 3-2 vote Wednesday. City officials and some merchants have complained that free meals offered by four church organizations are attracting increasing numbers of transients to the city of 50,000, a historic railroad town and longtime stopover for rail-riding hobos.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city of Berkeley is developing a plan to set up "urban campsites" on vacant lots so homeless people can get off the streets and sleep in pup tents at city-run camps. Under the proposal, which must be approved by the City Council, authorities would supervise the camps, limit the number inhabitants and provide sanitation facilities. Officials hope to avoid problems that arose five years ago when police broke up a homeless encampment after a double killing, a fire and drunken brawls.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after Northern California's deadly 7.1-magnitude earthquake, farm worker Jesus Garcia and his family are sharing a single room in a run-down Watsonville motel. The Garcias' apartment was destroyed in the quake and their application for federal housing assistance is under appeal. Brent and Erma Browning have not been able to move back into their damaged Santa Cruz mountain home because they are waiting for county building permits.
NEWS
July 20, 1990 | DAN MORAIN and HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Art Agnos, the former social worker, has a term for it: compassion fatigue. People were weary of being hit up for spare change. Brown-bagging office workers resented seeing 200 homeless, derelict and otherwise lost souls pitch camp in a choice picnic ground under the olive trees across from City Hall. The Chamber of Commerce worried that Civic Center panhandlers were scaring off tourists and conventioneers.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | MARIE GRAVELLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the sun sets on a chilly evening, two women steer a bicycle and a makeshift cart onto the grassy plaza in the center of this small college town. Their mission: Feed the homeless who gather in the plaza. Their problem: They have to break the law to do it in the public square. Arcata may be a bastion of liberal activism on California's rural North Coast, but even here tolerance for the homeless has its limits.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after Northern California's deadly 7.1-magnitude earthquake, farm worker Jesus Garcia and his family are sharing a single room in a run-down Watsonville motel. The Garcias' apartment was destroyed in the quake and their application for federal housing assistance is under appeal. Brent and Erma Browning have not been able to move back into their damaged Santa Cruz mountain home because they are waiting for county building permits.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Francisco-Oakland area may be the worst place in the nation for poor people to live because of its high housing costs, according to a report released Monday. The high costs are forcing poor households to spend excessive amounts of their limited incomes for shelter, the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities said. This forces the poor to divert money from other pressing needs, such as food, clothing and health care.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost two months after Northern California's deadly 7.1-magnitude earthquake, more than 600 people in this small farming community are still living in tents in a city park, sleeping on cots in Red Cross shelters or spending nights in cars or on lawns behind their condemned houses. Many of those who became homeless after the quake are still waiting for federal relief officials to open temporary mobile home parks.
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