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Homeless People

NATIONAL
June 11, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
You can't just feed the homeless outdoors in Philadelphia anymore; you now need a permit. In Dallas, you can give away food only with official permission first. Laws tightening regulations on aid to the homeless are popping up across the country, according to a recent USA Today report : “Atlanta, Phoenix, San Diego, Los Angeles, Miami, Oklahoma City and more than 50 other cities have previously adopted some kind of anti-camping or anti-food-sharing laws, according to the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty.” So the question being asked by many critics is: Are American officials trying to help the poor -- or legislate them out of sight?
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OPINION
October 23, 2011 | By Barbara Ehrenreich
Occupations such as those underway in cities across the country pose staggering logistical problems. Large numbers of people must be fed and kept reasonably warm and dry. Trash has to be removed; medical care and rudimentary security provided. But for the individual occupier, one problem often overshadows everything else: Where am I going to pee? Some of the Occupy Wall Street encampments spreading across the U.S. have access to portable toilets (such as those on the City Hall lawn in Los Angeles)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2012 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - A plan to combat panhandling and animal shelter overcrowding in one fell swoop could be described as killing two birds with one stone. But here in the city of St. Francis, no one talks about offing our feathered friends. Instead, the latest municipal innovation - which will pair beggars with problem puppies to make life better for both - is simply called WOOF: Wonderful Opportunities for Occupants and Fidos. In August, carefully selected dogs from the city shelter will be given to screened and trained formerly homeless people, who will foster the animals until permanent homes can be found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
A federal judge in Los Angeles has dismissed a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union against Santa Monica over the city's treatment of homeless people. U.S. District Judge George H. Wu dismissed the suit with prejudice, meaning the ACLU would be prohibited from bringing any future actions on the same claim. Santa Monica City Manager Rod Gould said a "resolution agreement" would soon be considered by the City Council, but he declined to discuss details. "The resolution agreement … will be available on the evening of June 8," Gould said.
OPINION
April 5, 2012
Now that the homeless are prohibited from camping overnight on Ocean Front Walk in Venice, many have migrated to other spots in the beach town. After numerous complaints about trash, city workers, accompanied by police, raided the new areas last month and confiscated unattended belongings, prompting a lawsuit from a civil rights attorney. According to the suit, filed on behalf of 11 named homeless people, employees of the Los Angeles Police Department and the Department of Public Works seized property found on 3rd Avenue in Venice that included birth certificates, food stamp eligibility cards, prescription medication, wallets with cash, and even laptop computers.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council, though taking care to stress its concern for the homeless, moved this week to make it illegal for homeless people to sleep or camp overnight in public places. Handling the topic gingerly, the council voted unanimously Tuesday to ask the city attorney's office to prepare a local ordinance patterned after Santa Barbara's ban on sleeping on public property. "I think it's a very difficult issue," Councilman Wallace Edgerton, who introduced the motion, said in an interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2012 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
After a wave of killings of homeless men in the area, police said Wednesday that they are looking for a "serious, dangerous serial killer operating in Orange County. " Investigators believe that one person is responsible for stabbing three middle-aged homeless men in 10 days and have formed a task force of police from Anaheim, Placentia and Brea to investigate the incidents. "We believe these murders were likely committed by the same suspect and feel he is extremely dangerous to the public," Anaheim Police Chief John Welter said at a news conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2013 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Bone-chilling fog swirled along Venice Beach one recent afternoon when Robert and Nani Valencia and Ana Maria Reyes stopped by the long, metal storage container beside the sand. After they showed IDs and claim checks, a volunteer wheeled out two blue recycling bins in which the three recent arrivals from Texas had stashed their suitcases. They pulled out toiletries, sweaters and blankets and stuffed them into reusable grocery bags. "It makes us feel a lot better to store our things here," said Nani Valencia, 37. "When you have all your [suitcases]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
Finding permanent housing for Los Angeles County's homeless rather than allowing them to continue living on the streets could save taxpayer money, according to a study released Tuesday by the United Way of Greater Los Angeles. The four-year study followed four homeless people while they lived on the streets and later as they found stable housing. Researchers concluded that taxpayers could save $20,000 a year per person using public services. There were an estimated 73,000 homeless in the county last year.
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