Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHomeless Russia
IN THE NEWS

Homeless Russia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the longest night of his life, Alexander N. Dunayev lay on a bleak stretch of snow beside a railway track through the lonely hours of darkness. At some point, cunning fingers slipped into his jacket to steal his wallet and documents. As the night wore on, Moscow's temperature dropped to 18 below. At home in the city's Khovrino district, Irina K. Dunayev waited for her husband and worried. The 42-year-old television engineer and father of two had called from the Khovrino station at 8:10 p.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the longest night of his life, Alexander N. Dunayev lay on a bleak stretch of snow beside a railway track through the lonely hours of darkness. At some point, cunning fingers slipped into his jacket to steal his wallet and documents. As the night wore on, Moscow's temperature dropped to 18 below. At home in the city's Khovrino district, Irina K. Dunayev waited for her husband and worried. The 42-year-old television engineer and father of two had called from the Khovrino station at 8:10 p.m.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS
In the dim kitchen of Valery Sokolov's shelter, 72-year-old Alexei Kuzmin, an energetic man with a sharp wit, paces angrily. "I have to stay here for the next two weeks, out of sight," he said. "I'm afraid to go out during the Goodwill Games." In 1939, Kuzmin, then 17, asked at a workers' meeting whether rumors that Stalin had freed the Georgian people of the obligation to pay taxes were true.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grim new barometer of freedom has come into existence in the Russian capital this winter--a daily count of homeless drunks found dead from the cold. At least 320 Muscovites have frozen to death on the capital's mean streets since November and another 800 have been hospitalized for exposure, said Igor F. Nadezhdin, spokesman for the Moscow Department of Health Care.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grim new barometer of freedom has come into existence in the Russian capital this winter--a daily count of homeless drunks found dead from the cold. At least 320 Muscovites have frozen to death on the capital's mean streets since November and another 800 have been hospitalized for exposure, said Igor F. Nadezhdin, spokesman for the Moscow Department of Health Care.
OPINION
December 20, 1992
This may well go down in the record books as the most naive idea in recorded history--It will probably appear more like a Frank Capra scenario than sound fiscal thinking--but I propose it nevertheless. President-elect Clinton has brought a new breath of fresh hope into our lives. I fear, however, with our crushing national deficit draining so much out of every dollar just to pay off the interest, Clinton will have to proceed with a huge dinosaur around his neck. As we all know, Superman is dead--and so our new President, strong as he may be, will have tough going trying to finance a health program, AIDS research, help for the homeless, Russia, Somalia and Bosnia, job training, education, farm assistance, ad infinitum--with this huge hunk of money needed just to pay off our incredible debt.
SPORTS
July 28, 1990 | Phil Jackman, The Baltimore Evening Sun
Postcard from the Puget Sound: A week in this city teaches you one thing: You didn't bring enough warm clothes. Oh well, break out that souvenir sweatshirt and pick up something at the airport on the way out. Whoever coined the line, "I spent a winter in San Francisco one summer," could have been talking about the Emerald City. The lyrics to the song goes, "The prettiest skies you've ever seen are in Seattle." Yeah, if varying shades of gray are your idea of splendor.
SPORTS
July 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS
In the dim kitchen of Valery Sokolov's shelter, 72-year-old Alexei Kuzmin, an energetic man with a sharp wit, paces angrily. "I have to stay here for the next two weeks, out of sight," he said. "I'm afraid to go out during the Goodwill Games." In 1939, Kuzmin, then 17, asked at a workers' meeting whether rumors that Stalin had freed the Georgian people of the obligation to pay taxes were true.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|