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NEWS
November 13, 1995 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt about it, many of the homeless in this socially progressive city certainly have an attitude. They saunter into city and county meetings, demanding funds for homeless programs. They march through downtown, posting flyers seeking blankets to get them through the chilly nights. They even set up a campground on the plaza of the County Administration Building, successfully pressuring officials into providing an indoor shelter for the upcoming winter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Years after facing patient dumping allegations and hefty legal settlements, Southern California hospital executives have begun working with advocates for the homeless to improve the health of homeless patients and to reduce their use of area hospitals. Hospital administrators are driven by the national healthcare law, which offers incentives to provide better care at lower cost and imposes penalties when patients are unnecessarily readmitted to hospitals. Homeless patients are among the most frequent users of the region's medical centers, often because they lack regular medical care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors agreed Tuesday to give priority to the most hard-core street dwellers when allocating housing and other homeless services. "These are the people who need help the most," said Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, who proposed the motion with Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. "They are the ones who have been on the streets the longest amount of time.... [They] are the most in danger of getting sick and dying on the streets. " The proposal, adopted unanimously, is part of a plan recommended by business leaders that aims within five years to put a permanent roof over the heads of all homeless veterans and the chronically homeless by making more efficient use of existing resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2012 | Mike Reicher
Looking to cut down on homeless services in Costa Mesa, Mayor Eric Bever has asked the city to investigate some of the city's most prominent and long-running charities. Bever singled out Share Our Selves and Someone Cares Soup Kitchen, decades-old nonprofits that dispense food and medical care to the poor and homeless. The mayor compared the charities to nightclubs that have become neighborhood nuisances. It would go a long way to solving the problem of homeless people coming to Costa Mesa, the mayor said, "if we managed to put the soup kitchen out of business.
NEWS
December 25, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Bondage Busters, the homeless services organization that not long ago was flying high with spacious new quarters and ambitious programs, finds itself homeless this holiday season. Bondage Busters founder and director Charles Hudson had been hoping to work out an arrangement with property owner Robert Wilson since the organization shut down four months ago, but a change in tenants is most likely to happen next month.
OPINION
July 18, 2007
COUNTIES GET state money they can use to house the homeless. They get money they can spend to treat the mentally ill. But the quirks and aggravations of government being what they are, counties can't spend homeless dollars to treat the mentally ill or mental health dollars to house the homeless. Sound reasonable? Not if people living on the street need mental health treatment. Which, obviously, many do.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Compared to some other Southern California cities, Whittier does not have much of a homeless problem. On any given day, about 50 to 100 homeless people call Whittier home. Nevertheless, faced with a perceived influx of homeless into the city of 79,000, the Whittier City Council last week voted to try to limit homeless services. The council asked social service agencies to help only homeless "Whittier-ites," that is, those who used to have homes in Whittier or are related to people who do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legislation is pending before Congress that would nearly double the amount of federal funds Los Angeles receives to combat the problems associated with the city's large homeless population. Under the proposed law, the city would receive its share of Department of Housing and Urban Development funds according to a formula, thus eliminating the annual competition for grants that is required under the current system. The city received $20.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1996
Homeless services on the Westside will be the topic of a public hearing tonight in Culver City. The hearing is one in a series of meetings coordinated throughout the county by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, which is asking for the public's opinion on how to spend an annual funding grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
OPINION
August 12, 2003
The National Coalition for the Homeless unfairly ranked Los Angeles as the "fourth-meanest city" for the homeless (Aug. 6). The past year has, in fact, been a historic watershed for homeless services in Los Angeles. Ten elected officials have formally launched a 10-year plan to end homelessness. Local discretionary funding for homeless services almost doubled. City officials expanded a temporary winter program to a year-round emergency program, adding 860 much-needed beds throughout the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors agreed Tuesday to give priority to the most hard-core street dwellers when allocating housing and other homeless services. "These are the people who need help the most," said Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky, who proposed the motion with Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. "They are the ones who have been on the streets the longest amount of time.... [They] are the most in danger of getting sick and dying on the streets. " The proposal, adopted unanimously, is part of a plan recommended by business leaders that aims within five years to put a permanent roof over the heads of all homeless veterans and the chronically homeless by making more efficient use of existing resources.
OPINION
June 22, 2008 | Jennifer Wolch, Gary Blasi and Michael Dear, Jennifer Wolch and Michael Dear are professors of geography at USC. Gary Blasi is a law professor at UCLA.
Nearly 18 months ago, a group of scholars released a study on homelessness in Los Angeles County. The report, "A Reality-based Approach to Ending Homelessness in Los Angeles," said that a worsening economy, a shortage of affordable housing, cutbacks in welfare programs and personal vulnerabilities (including mental disabilities and health-related issues) were all contributing to a rise in homelessness in the county, and that skid row was bearing the brunt of the burden of caring for them.
OPINION
July 18, 2007
COUNTIES GET state money they can use to house the homeless. They get money they can spend to treat the mentally ill. But the quirks and aggravations of government being what they are, counties can't spend homeless dollars to treat the mentally ill or mental health dollars to house the homeless. Sound reasonable? Not if people living on the street need mental health treatment. Which, obviously, many do.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2007 | Cara Mia DiMassa and Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County's much-touted effort to shift homeless services from downtown Los Angeles to other areas is beginning to take shape, with county leaders zeroing in on three communities where homeless centers could be built. A year ago, the Board of Supervisors approved an ambitious $100-million homeless plan, the centerpiece of which was a proposal to build five "regional centers" in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2006 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
As the thermometer plunged toward the freezing mark Thursday night, Roland Jones donned seven T-shirts and four sweat shirts and pulled a sleeping bag over his wheelchair. And then, outside near the corner of 6th and San Pedro streets in skid row, his home of the last six years, Jones tried to go to sleep.
OPINION
August 1, 2006
Re "When equal isn't fair," editorial, July 27 You incorrectly state my position on homeless shelters. Shelter facilities are vital, but without fundamental reform of the state's mental health laws, the homeless are locked in a broken system of warehousing without healing. A long-term solution requires state legislation to end the "revolving door" system that denies necessary medical treatment or rehabilitation. Hardly "allergic" to shelters, I recently presented two $1-million grants to Pasadena's Union Station facility and the Lancaster Homeless Shelter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1996
Hoping to obtain more money for homeless services in the San Fernando Valley, about 40 activists and heads of social service organizations on Monday presented their funding priorities to representatives of the Los Angeles Homeless Service Authority. It is the city-county umbrella agency that last year administered the county's $71 million in Housing and Urban Development funds for homeless services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000 | GRACE E. JANG
Hot food and a warm bed. From now through February the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority will provide free room and board in Sylmar for those who cannot afford shelter this winter. The winter shelter is at Sylmar National Guard Armory, 12860 Arroyo Drive. Transportation to the shelter will be provided every 15 to 30 minutes, from 5:30 to 9:15 p.m. every evening at the following sites throughout the Valley: * Lutheran Social Services, 6425 Tyrone Ave., Van Nuys.
OPINION
May 4, 2006
FOUR WEEKS AGO, JAMIE KRONICK moved into her first home in six years. She had been sleeping on the streets of Santa Monica, often in a doorway if the building's owners didn't make too much of a fuss. Now Kronick, who is 50, lives in a clean, well-lighted studio apartment in Silver Lake so new it smells of fresh paint. Kronick's story, sadly, is as exceptional as her apartment. It's hard enough to get homeless people the services they need so they can begin to get their lives together.
OPINION
April 3, 2006
LATE LAST MONTH, the county Board of Supervisors announced a $100-million plan to improve services for the homeless on skid row and beyond. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was barely consulted about the plan, and he didn't know when it was being unveiled.
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