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NEWS
October 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
A few hundred homeless marchers wrapped themselves in blankets on a stadium parking lot Thursday night as their leaders complained that the demonstrators arriving in the capital did not have an adequate place to sleep or use the bathroom. Activists blamed the National Union of the Homeless, which organized the gathering, for failing to provide adequate facilities. "The conditions there are awful," said activist John Steinbruck.
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NEWS
December 22, 1994 | From Associated Press
Marcelino Corniel, the knife-wielding homeless man shot by police in front of the White House, died Wednesday night after undergoing two lengthy operations and remaining in critical condition for 36 hours. Corniel, 33, died from cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit at George Washington University Hospital, less than four blocks from the shooting scene, about 9 p.m. EST, said Rich James, a hospital spokesman. Corniel was shot once in the abdomen and once in his right leg by a uniformed U.S.
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NEWS
January 19, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
As guests dressed in gowns and black ties strode under Union Station's white canopy into a gala, $1,500-a-plate inaugural dinner Wednesday night, hundreds of demonstrators protesting the inauguration's price tag served up free food to several dozen homeless people in the brick-lined shadows 50 yards away.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and AARON NATHANS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A homeless man brandishing a nine-inch knife was shot by a U.S. Park Police officer in front of the White House Tuesday, marking the third shooting outside the presidential residence in two months. Marcelino Corniel, 33, a Southern California native who had been camped in adjacent Lafayette Park, was shot in the chest and leg after charging across Pennsylvania Avenue about 9 a.m. and menacing a cordon of U.S. Park Police officers, authorities said.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | From Associated Press
Marcelino Corniel, the knife-wielding homeless man shot by police in front of the White House, died Wednesday night after undergoing two lengthy operations and remaining in critical condition for 36 hours. Corniel, 33, died from cardiac arrest in the intensive care unit at George Washington University Hospital, less than four blocks from the shooting scene, about 9 p.m. EST, said Rich James, a hospital spokesman. Corniel was shot once in the abdomen and once in his right leg by a uniformed U.S.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Health workers will sweep through Washington's homeless shelters tonight to test residents for tuberculosis in a novel, high-stakes strategy to control the resurgent disease in one of its main breeding grounds. Officials hope eventually to reach up to 5,000 homeless men and women. The campaign marks the first time any large U.S. city will try systematically to examine people in homeless shelters to find and treat TB, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and AARON NATHANS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A homeless man brandishing a nine-inch knife was shot by a U.S. Park Police officer in front of the White House Tuesday, marking the third shooting outside the presidential residence in two months. Marcelino Corniel, 33, a Southern California native who had been camped in adjacent Lafayette Park, was shot in the chest and leg after charging across Pennsylvania Avenue about 9 a.m. and menacing a cordon of U.S. Park Police officers, authorities said.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and AARON NATHANS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A former Anaheim man brandishing a nine-inch knife was shot by a U.S. Park Police officer in front of the White House on Tuesday, marking the third shooting outside the presidential residence in two months. Marcelino Corniel, 33, a homeless man who had been camped in adjacent Lafayette Park, was shot in the chest and leg after charging across Pennsylvania Avenue about 9 a.m. and menacing a cordon of U.S. Park Police officers, authorities said.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
In her initial outing as First Lady, Barbara Bush visited a tattered section of Washington Tuesday to make salami and cheese sandwiches and to read a story for 35 children at a charity facility that helps the homeless. Wearing a red apron and up to her elbows in wheat bread, Mrs. Bush said that she chose the facility, called Martha's Table, for her first excursion "because I'm hoping Americans will look at the range of volunteerism and see how important it is, what an important job they do."
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | United Press International
The District of Columbia City Council on Tuesday approved a bill that effectively guts the city's landmark 1984 voter-mandated right-to-shelter law, claiming that the measure had been too costly. The council voted to amend Initiative 17, which orders the city to provide emergency shelter to anyone requesting it, regardless of its budget constraints. The city spent $10 million on its homeless program in 1985, compared to nearly $40 million in federal and local funds for homeless programs in 1989.
NEWS
December 21, 1994 | PAUL RICHTER and AARON NATHANS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A former Anaheim man brandishing a nine-inch knife was shot by a U.S. Park Police officer in front of the White House on Tuesday, marking the third shooting outside the presidential residence in two months. Marcelino Corniel, 33, a homeless man who had been camped in adjacent Lafayette Park, was shot in the chest and leg after charging across Pennsylvania Avenue about 9 a.m. and menacing a cordon of U.S. Park Police officers, authorities said.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | RENE SANCHEZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
He came to the District of Columbia's largest homeless shelter a few years ago dirty, desperate and broke, a hapless former drug dealer who had been sleeping for months on the street. Today, Keith Mitchell is running the place.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Health workers will sweep through Washington's homeless shelters tonight to test residents for tuberculosis in a novel, high-stakes strategy to control the resurgent disease in one of its main breeding grounds. Officials hope eventually to reach up to 5,000 homeless men and women. The campaign marks the first time any large U.S. city will try systematically to examine people in homeless shelters to find and treat TB, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They crop up like weeds, these Not In My Back Yard battles. The neighbors don't want that garbage dump nearby, nor the home for the retarded on the cul-de-sac. They'll destroy property values, opponents argue; they're dirty, dangerous, a magnet for crime and outsiders. The District of Columbia is slugging out a vintage NIMBY. At issue is a homeless shelter that the city wants to open half a mile from Vice President Dan Quayle's house, in a political district known as Ward 3.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Mitch Snyder, whose personal demons apparently overwhelmed his fierce commitment to the nation's homeless, was remembered Friday as "a man of justice" who worked tirelessly to assist the downtrodden. The Rev. Jesse Jackson told a memorial service at Bible Way Church that Snyder was a man who heard and answered a "moral call" to help the homeless.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitch Snyder, the man whose hunger strikes and acid commentary made him the nation's best-known advocate for the homeless, was found dead Thursday in his room in a Washington shelter in what police said was an "apparent suicide by hanging." Although police found a suicide note, they said that its contents would not be released before the investigation into Snyder's death is completed.
NEWS
September 26, 1988
Homeless activist Mitch Snyder said that efforts by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to keep homeless people from finding shelter in subway station entrances are "absolutely revolting." The city installed permanent barriers at the entrances to several downtown subway stops to prevent entry to the stations after the subways stop running at night.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From United Press International
Homeless advocate Mitch Snyder, whose 51-day fast in 1984 forced the Ronald Reagan Administration to allocate funds for the homeless, launched another hunger strike Saturday in the nation's capital. Snyder began his fast at noon and was joined by 21 members of his Community for Creative Non-Violence homeless advocacy group.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | United Press International
The District of Columbia City Council on Tuesday approved a bill that effectively guts the city's landmark 1984 voter-mandated right-to-shelter law, claiming that the measure had been too costly. The council voted to amend Initiative 17, which orders the city to provide emergency shelter to anyone requesting it, regardless of its budget constraints. The city spent $10 million on its homeless program in 1985, compared to nearly $40 million in federal and local funds for homeless programs in 1989.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From United Press International
Homeless advocate Mitch Snyder, whose 51-day fast in 1984 forced the Ronald Reagan Administration to allocate funds for the homeless, launched another hunger strike Saturday in the nation's capital. Snyder began his fast at noon and was joined by 21 members of his Community for Creative Non-Violence homeless advocacy group.
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