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March 5, 1989
"Developers Find Peace at a Price" which appeared on the front page of the Sunday Times (Feb. 26) dismayed me. The recent practice of extracting tribute from a developer as the price for settlement of a zoning matter has apparently been initiated by Friends of Westwood. This surprises me since the other co-founder is Laura Lake, a respected UCLA professor of urban planning and a candidate for the City Council. I have served on the board of directors of the Tract 7260 Homeowner Assn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2009 | David Zahniser
Bowing to pressure from homeowner groups and environmental advocates, the Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to pull back a plan to hike fees for residents and groups that seek to challenge the city's development decisions. The council had been planning to impose an array of new fees that would have forced residents to pay as much as $500 to appeal a zoning decision and as much as $3,000 to challenge a permit issued by the Department of Building and Safety. The current fees are $74 and $368, respectively.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
Homeowner associations in Encino and Sherman Oaks have banded together to oppose a proposed major renovation of the Sherman Oaks Galleria and an adjacent building that would replace retail and office space with new restaurants, movie theaters and entertainment facilities. Residents liken the proposed multimillion-dollar project to Universal CityWalk, and predict that the Galleria project could foster the same type of youthful hooliganism.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2009 | Stephen Glassman and Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our homeowner association claims that common areas that border an owner's property belong to the titleholder and are not the association's responsibility. Since several homes have gone into foreclosure, sidewalks in front of these areas have become cluttered with twigs and other debris that has piled up. If someone falls on these sidewalks, could the association be held liable? If so, would this risk give the association the right to clean up these areas?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992
Two Westside homeowner groups filed a lawsuit against Los Angeles and its Planning Commission on Friday, claiming the city violated its planning rules to silence neighborhood opposition to 20th Century Fox studio expansion plan. The lawsuit was filed in Los Angeles Superior Court on behalf of the Cheviot Hills Homeowners Assn. and its neighbor to the east, the California Country Club Homes Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
Community activist Toby Keeler will be installed Friday for his second term as president of the Las Virgenes Homeowners Federation Inc., an umbrella organization of 20 Calabasas-area homeowner groups. Assemblywoman Sheila J. Kuehl (D-Santa Monica), whose 41st District includes Calabasas, will be the guest speaker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1990 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until recently, David Gordon, a Burbank optometrist, had never been to a City Council meeting. That changed in December when Gordon, a city resident for seven years, learned from a member of a local homeowner group that Hollywood Way, the street his business is on, might be widened. Incensed, Gordon set about organizing merchants along the thoroughfare to oppose the possible widening and has taken his case to City Hall.
REAL ESTATE
March 19, 1989
The questions in Sam Hall Kaplan's "Whose Pasadena Is It, Anyway" (Feb. 26) are being asked not only in Pasadena, but in Burbank and my community as well. The answers are clear. Established homeowner groups are flexing their wealth and promoting a hidden agenda. For them it's not the apartments that are really the problem, it's the people who live in them. In Glendale, where there is no architectural integrity to lose, the true position of hillside homeowners is obvious. In its sophistication, the Pasadena example is even more heinous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1993
We're pleased with your article detailing the great strides the Burbank Airport has made in reducing aircraft noise. Obviously, though, some homeowner groups are unwilling to accept the facts. This is not through sheer cussedness. Perceptions of noise are highly subjective, and once a person focuses on a particular sound, it's hard to accept the idea that there have been cuts of any kind. Yet there have, in fact, been massive cuts. Another fact the homeowner groups seem unwilling to accept is that they have won a great victory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996
Calling it a dangerous and potentially harmful proposal, Los Angeles City Councilman Joel Wachs and several San Fernando Valley homeowner groups plan to protest a proposal Wednesday that would limit the council's authority to hear public appeals of planning decisions.
REAL ESTATE
April 6, 2008 | Frank Nelson, Special to The Times
Homeowner associations are rocked by a triple whammy when they discover they are victims of fraud. First, there's the financial loss, which may be substantial. Next, the association members have to deal with the betrayal of trust. And third comes the nagging realization that this might have been prevented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2008 | Steve Hymon and Martha Groves, Times Staff Writers
Four Westside homeowners groups have reached a settlement that will allow construction to proceed on two 47-story and one 12-story luxury condominium buildings in Century City. The settlement calls for the developer of the Constellation Park project, Century City Realty LLC, a subsidiary of JMB Realty Corp., to pay $2.25 million to a mitigation fund overseen by four groups representing homeowners near Century City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2007 | Jeffrey L. Rabin and Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writers
For years, a homeowners association in Cheviot Hills has been able to derail plans to put modern-day streetcars on an old railroad line that skirts the upscale Westside neighborhood. But now, those residents' long opposition to mass transit in their backyard is encountering resistance from neighbors fed up with worsening congestion that has slowed traffic to a crawl.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2006 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
NBC Universal said Wednesday that it had hired a prominent Los Angeles real estate developer and architectural firm to create a plan for future construction at Universal City that may include housing, offices, stores and production facilities. The 400-acre parcel in the Cahuenga Pass is considered one of the region's prime pieces of real estate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
The long-running scuffle over public access on Broad Beach in Malibu took another twist Friday when the California Coastal Commission ordered an end to the posting of no-trespassing signs and the use of security guards on all-terrain vehicles to chase visitors off the dry sand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2005 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
Bo Kelleher admits that on some subjects, he minces no words. Same-sex marriage is "garbage," he says. Abortion-rights activists are "morally bereft," and child molesters are "subhuman." But when he expressed similar opinions on LaderaLife.com, his community's private website, he was told to play nice or be banned. He was banned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987
Opposition to a rapid transit system for the Valley by homeowner groups appears to be that of primarily affluent homeowners versus moderate- and low-income people, who are dependent primarily upon public transit. These Valley homeowner groups have succeeded in blocking the development of any type of public mass transit for the San Fernando Valley. They claim such a system is noisy and aesthetically unappealing. Furthermore, they state that since many of them use their cars as part of their employment, they have no need of any type of public transit system and, therefore, it would be of no benefit to them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
A bill that would have curtailed homeowners groups' powers to foreclose on members' homes has been vetoed by the governor, who said the legislation was too sweeping and that he instead favored incremental changes to the current law. AB 2598 would have banned so-called nonjudicial foreclosures in cases in which homeowners owe $2,500 or less in association dues. It also would have added restrictions in cases involving higher amounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2004 | Stanley Allison, Times Staff Writer
The notice that was posted in the Leisure World laundry room caused 75-year-old Pauline Hamric to shudder. Her homeowners association, it appeared, was taking steps to ban pets in her Seal Beach neighborhood -- unsettling news for Hamric, who had recently bought a Chihuahua puppy for companionship. The notice contained a draft of a policy declaring that "no shareholder will be allowed to bring a pet into Mutual Twelve from this day forth." It invited residents to submit comments.
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