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Homeownership And Opportunity For People Everywhere

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
If Didi Barney had to depend on her pocketbook, she could pay for about two hours of a consultant's time to advise her on expanding her four-employee business. Thanks to a new venture launched Thursday by Los Angeles for small business owners in Pacoima, Barney, director of H.O.P.E. America, can get 50 hours of advice for free. H.O.P.E. America assists first-time home buyers with lenders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
If Didi Barney had to depend on her pocketbook, she could pay for about two hours of a consultant's time to advise her on expanding her four-employee business. Thanks to a new venture launched Thursday by Los Angeles for small business owners in Pacoima, Barney, director of H.O.P.E. America, can get 50 hours of advice for free. H.O.P.E. America assists first-time home buyers with lenders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1993 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimi Gray has done in Washington what many public housing residents are trying to do in Los Angeles. During the last two decades, Gray led tenants at the Kenilworth Parkside project in a successful fight to turn the complex from a drug-infested, unheated slum that had been forgotten by city authorities into a clean, safe development owned by a resident co-op and boasting its own employment training and day-care centers, grocery store and medical facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1993 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimi Gray has done in Washington what many public housing residents are trying to do in Los Angeles. During the last two decades, Gray led tenants at the Kenilworth Parkside project in a successful fight to turn the complex from a drug-infested, unheated slum that had been forgotten by city authorities into a clean, safe development owned by a resident co-op and boasting its own employment training and day-care centers, grocery store and medical facility.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Reuters
President Bush today unveiled a $4.2-billion housing assistance program that he said would help first-time buyers and poor Americans buy their own homes. In a speech to the National Assn. of Realtors, Bush asked Congress to let first-time home buyers withdraw up to $10,000 without penalty from Individual Retirement Accounts for home down payments. Ordinarily, the government imposes heavy taxes on IRA funds withdrawn before age 59 1/2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1992
It was a great joy for me to take part last Saturday in the Nickerson Gardens Youth Summit and the 50th anniversary of Estrada Courts. The great strides made by resident management groups in these and other public housing communities are creating opportunities for youth who deserve a better future and families to get a stake in the American dream of homeownership. The coverage of my visit raised questions regarding the exact nature of the federal aid I announced. Allow me to clear up those questions here.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone seems to agree there is a problem: Too many Americans can't find affordable housing. According to a recent study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Low Income Housing Information Service, two Washington nonprofit research groups that have conducted a series of studies on affordable housing, the number of poor households has increased as the number of low-income rental units has declined. The net result has been "a loss of 1.8 million low-rent units . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pledging that the Bush Administration will cast aside politics to help rebuild inner cities, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp announced Saturday that the federal government will commit $137 million this year to refurbish public housing projects and create job opportunities in riot-ravaged South Los Angeles communities.
OPINION
June 14, 1992 | George Bush, George Bush is the 41st President of the United States
As Angelenos begin to rebuild riot-torn neighborhoods, all Americans must begin rebuilding America's social policies. Detailed, one- size-fits-all "solutions" crafted in the 1960s obviously can't cope with the challenges of the 1990s. In Los Angeles, we all have seen the horrible toll of rioters' violence. I have seen the failures of old urban policies in the windows of tidy houses where iron bars try to hold a hostile world at bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1992 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine the Nickerson Gardens Cooperative--a sprawling assortment of well-kept units in Watts for sale at bargain prices, with modern appliances, skylights and great freeway access. That's what a group of residents is proposing for Los Angeles' largest public housing project, a place better known today for its late-night gunfire, poverty and roaches. Elected tenant leaders at Nickerson Gardens have applied for $111 million from the U.S.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush presented Congress on Wednesday with a $1.5-trillion budget for 1993 that combines proposed new cuts in defense spending, standstill funding for most domestic programs and a package of tax cuts that Administration officials vowed would produce a "certain" economic recovery by midyear. The Administration said the $50.4 billion in new defense cuts it has proposed over five years must be used to reduce the deficit rather than to finance domestic needs. And it proposed to pay for $24.
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