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Homestead Air Force Base

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NEWS
September 2, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Tuesday that the federal government will pay the full costs of repairing the damage Hurricane Andrew wreaked on public buildings, roads and other facilities in Florida and asked the nation to open its arms and hearts to the stricken region. The federal assistance will spare state and local governments untold billions of dollars of reconstruction costs, White House officials said.
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NEWS
March 27, 1994 | Associated Press
The flag is flying again over Homestead Air Force Base, which reopened Saturday for the first time since Hurricane Andrew nearly wiped it out in 1992. Only now it will be an air reserve base. The 482nd Fighter Wing's F-16 jets returned in formation for the first time since they were evacuated before the storm tore apart the base's buildings and aircraft on Aug. 24, 1992. The U.S.
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NEWS
March 27, 1994 | Associated Press
The flag is flying again over Homestead Air Force Base, which reopened Saturday for the first time since Hurricane Andrew nearly wiped it out in 1992. Only now it will be an air reserve base. The 482nd Fighter Wing's F-16 jets returned in formation for the first time since they were evacuated before the storm tore apart the base's buildings and aircraft on Aug. 24, 1992. The U.S.
NEWS
March 15, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Until 6 1/2 months ago, Homestead Air Force Base was a Defense Department showplace, a palm-shaded post on Florida's southern tip where 4,400 active-duty military personnel and an equal number of civilian employees worked and played in what looked like a well-tended resort. "With a conference center, and a great little golf course, this was perceived as a jewel by Air Force brass stationed in Washington and Virginia, especially in winter," said Homestead Mayor Tad DeMilly.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Appropriations Committee approved legislation Thursday to provide $7.2 billion in disaster relief for storm-ravaged South Florida and Louisiana but rejected President Bush's request for nearly $500 million to reconstruct devastated Homestead Air Force Base. The package, to be considered by the full Senate early next week, is only slightly smaller than the $7.6-billion proposal outlined earlier by the President.
NEWS
March 15, 1993 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Until 6 1/2 months ago, Homestead Air Force Base was a Defense Department showplace, a palm-shaded post on Florida's southern tip where 4,400 active-duty military personnel and an equal number of civilian employees worked and played in what looked like a well-tended resort. "With a conference center, and a great little golf course, this was perceived as a jewel by Air Force brass stationed in Washington and Virginia, especially in winter," said Homestead Mayor Tad DeMilly.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | From United Press International
An Air Force F-16A jet fighter crashed Wednesday in a remote section of Homestead Air Force Base, but military officials said the pilot parachuted to safety.
NEWS
October 12, 1987
Cuban combat pilots regularly practice retaliatory strikes against Homestead Air Force Base in Florida, a Cuban air force general who defected to the United States five months ago said in an interview with the New York Times. Brig. Gen. Rafael del Pino Diaz, a former deputy air force commander, said Cuba recognizes that it is no match for the United States and that the training is strictly defensive.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | Times Wire Services
Getting deposed Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega to and from the federal courthouse from his jail cell 24 miles away has cost taxpayers $363,694 since January, when he arrived in south Florida from Panama. Officials attributed the high tab to the "extraordinary costs of security details" needed.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | Associated Press
Hurricane Andrew may have devastated the nation's cocaine capital, but traffickers and drug hunters are quickly returning to business as usual, officials say. After the storm, high-tech radar and detection equipment was quietly flown into devastated Homestead Air Force Base--the center for many interdiction programs--and is operating under camouflage.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Appropriations Committee approved legislation Thursday to provide $7.2 billion in disaster relief for storm-ravaged South Florida and Louisiana but rejected President Bush's request for nearly $500 million to reconstruct devastated Homestead Air Force Base. The package, to be considered by the full Senate early next week, is only slightly smaller than the $7.6-billion proposal outlined earlier by the President.
NEWS
September 2, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Tuesday that the federal government will pay the full costs of repairing the damage Hurricane Andrew wreaked on public buildings, roads and other facilities in Florida and asked the nation to open its arms and hearts to the stricken region. The federal assistance will spare state and local governments untold billions of dollars of reconstruction costs, White House officials said.
NEWS
August 5, 1988
A federal air safety inspector and an Air Force lieutenant colonel helped as many as 20 fighter pilots cheat on their exams for commercial aviation licenses, prosecutors said. The men, along with four former officers, all from Homestead Air Force Base south of Miami, were named in an indictment accusing them of falsifying test results and trying to cover up the scandal.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | Associated Press
Gov. Lawton Chiles said Friday that getting money from Congress to rebuild hurricane-ravaged Homestead Air Force Base may be a lost battle, and he suggested a less expensive commercial airport in its place. The base accounted for more than 25% of an economy flattened by Hurricane Andrew, and it provided more than 5,000 jobs and homes for 1,800 people. Residents were hoping for $480 million to restore the military operations, but a Senate committee rejected the request Thursday.
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