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NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Karin Klein
A poll of public school teachers finds that on average, high school students are assigned 3.5 hours of homework per weeknight, or more than 17 hours a week. Or that's the teachers' perspective, anyway. If that's how it actually plays out, it strikes me as too much by far. I'm no homework-denier. When you look at the research , it's clear that homework, at least at the high school level, contributes to higher achievement. But I'm also in the camp that says kids, including teenagers, need well-balanced lives that include extracurricular activities, outside pursuits, physical activity, fun with friends and family, and just hanging around accomplishing nothing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Monday is opening day, of sorts, in the 2014 election season. In the races for governor and seven other statewide offices, for Congress and the Legislature, and for four key Los Angeles County offices, everything up until now has been a kind of political spring training, with potential candidates testing their messages and building their war chests. But filing closed Friday, and now we're underway. Although election day is officially June 3, voting begins the first week of May, less than 60 days from now. The exhibition season is over.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1999
Re "Some School Advice for Parents," Voices, Sept. 25: Having completed 42 years of teaching in the public schools, there are some points with which I agree. I must take exception to Jeff Lantos' position on homework. Homework should not necessarily be on the top of the priority list. I believe music, sports, organizations designed for young children and religious instruction should take priority. My wife and I are grandparents. If we had the resources we would start a national movement and call it "Grandparents Against Homework."
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. -- A day later, Mike Trout was still confused about Thursday's play at the plate against the Dodgers, when baseball's new rules governing home-plate collisions and instant replay converged on the same play. Trout, trying for an inside-the-park home run, was called out on a head-first slide into the plate. Manager Mike Scioscia came out to argue not only the call but whether Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis was in violation of Rule 7.13, which prevents catchers from blocking the plate without the ball.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000
Re "Homework Driving Parents Nuts," Nov. 22. Your article points out that the problem begins with the parents, not the children. The parents are setting a bad example beginning with their narrow perspective of education as a whole, diminishing the authority of teachers and school administrators, and with misguided expectations of both their children and the school system. Parents too often don't set priorities in their own lives (fun, sports, ballet override homework, chores).
TRAVEL
February 26, 1989
Peter Greenberg, who wrote "Nursery at 25,000 Feet" (Jan. 29), needs to do a lot more homework before writing another such article. First, you cannot compare a domestic deregulated airline with a government supported international foreign carrier. If the mothers would like to have all this help, they and everyone else should be prepared to pay two or three times the cost of their tickets to pay for the personnel that would be involved. Two, the size of the aircraft dictates the space for conveniences such as fold-out changing tables.
OPINION
April 21, 2011 | Meghan Daum
I get lots of emails. They generally break down like this: People telling me I'm brilliant and the reason print media is hanging on; people telling me I'm a moron and the reason print media is dying; people trying to get me to write about their book/cause/personal gripe; people asking me to read something they wrote about their book/cause/personal gripe; and people asking for help with their homework. That's right. Not a week goes by that I don't hear from at least one high school student who's been assigned a paper about my writing and wants me to tell her what to say. They come from every region of the country, and from private schools and public schools alike.
OPINION
July 1, 2011
Scenes from a public school childhood: The second-grade teacher sends home a pile of worksheets almost every night. Mom is trying to coax her child through the pages once again, until the 7-year-old has a meltdown and screams, "I hate school!" That fourth-grade rite of passage — constructing a model of a California mission — is beyond the abilities of most 9-year-olds, so Dad works patiently for hours erecting miniature white walls and red roofs. When father and child proudly deliver the finished product to the classroom, they see other models so sophisticated that only professional architects could have glued sugar cubes together so artfully.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Well, that's one way to get into an Ivy League school. According to an email survey of more than 1,300 incoming Harvard students, the Harvard Crimson reports , 10% of the campus' new freshman class have cheated on tests and 42% have cheated on homework. That's probably going to be unwelcome news for the 377-year-old university, which is still recovering from a 2012 scandal in which more than 100 students were accused of cheating on a take-home exam for an introductory-level class on Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2000 | ALLISON COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Parents filed in like troubled souls in group therapy to the Encino branch of the Huntington Learning Center to talk about the issue that is wreaking havoc in their households: Homework. With increased pressure on schools to improve scores on standardized tests, teachers are pouring on the homework, which is creating a nightly battleground at the kitchen tables of some families. "Last night I got so frustrated my husband had to take over," said parent Ellie Long.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Karin Klein
A poll of public school teachers finds that on average, high school students are assigned 3.5 hours of homework per weeknight, or more than 17 hours a week. Or that's the teachers' perspective, anyway. If that's how it actually plays out, it strikes me as too much by far. I'm no homework-denier. When you look at the research , it's clear that homework, at least at the high school level, contributes to higher achievement. But I'm also in the camp that says kids, including teenagers, need well-balanced lives that include extracurricular activities, outside pursuits, physical activity, fun with friends and family, and just hanging around accomplishing nothing.
SPORTS
February 26, 2014 | By Chuck Schilken
Frank Robinson last played for the Baltimore Orioles in 1971. His final season as the team's manager was in 1991. Josh Hart was born in 1994. So it's not entirely surprising that the outfielder chosen 37th overall by Baltimore in last June's amateur draft didn't know much about the Orioles legend, who now serves as MLB's executive vice president of baseball development. So Baltimore Manager Buck Showalter decided to play schoolteacher after the 19-year-old prospect was introduced to the 78-year-old Hall of Famer at spring training camp on Monday.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
Well, that's one way to get into an Ivy League school. According to an email survey of more than 1,300 incoming Harvard students, the Harvard Crimson reports , 10% of the campus' new freshman class have cheated on tests and 42% have cheated on homework. That's probably going to be unwelcome news for the 377-year-old university, which is still recovering from a 2012 scandal in which more than 100 students were accused of cheating on a take-home exam for an introductory-level class on Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Moviegoers have always loved seeing Leonardo DiCaprio sporting period costumes, just so long as it's not a fat suit . But as eye-popping as this weekend's box-office results were for "The Great Gatsby," not that many moviegoers felt compelled to watch DiCaprio don a tux or strut his stuff wearing a pink suit in the 3-D format. Only 33% of "Gatsby's" $51.1-million weekend gross came from 3-D showings, a cut considerably less than what action-adventure spectacles typically make.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
New York City educators have learned the hard way that there are some things that just don't mix -- like using slavery to teach math. The principal of P.S. 59, a well-thought-of elementary school that draws students from Midtown and the area around the United Nations, told the Daily News that she was “appalled” by the assignment and has ordered sensitivity training for all of the staff. Last month, one of the fourth-grade teachers sent pupils home with math problems that were based on slavery.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Janet Kinosian
There's no arguing that Tom Hooper's "Les Misérables" is a big film. It is based on both a very big book by Victor Hugo and a stage version that has been seen by 60 million people in 42 countries. It is a tale of big ideas and social upheavals. The film runs more than 21/2 hours, and it sports a cast of more than 200 credited roles and masses of extras. And it was definitely a big job for costume designer Paco Delgado, who had to create approximately 2,200 costumes for a time period that spanned much of the first half of the 19th century.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
J.C. Penney Co. has stopped selling a shirt for girls after shoppers expressed outrage over what they called an inappropriate and sexist message. "I'm too pretty to do homework, so my brother has to do it for me," said the message scrawled across the white, long-sleeve shirt, which was intended for girls ages 7 to 16. The shirt was available only through J.C. Penney's website. Customers immediately criticized J.C. Penney for promoting girls' looks over their brains. "This shirt is insulting and offensive.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Mike Bresnahan
The halfway point of the Lakers' season is still a week away but it's come to this: They need to win home games against teams like the Milwaukee Bucks if they want to make the playoffs. So they did Tuesday night, breaking the Bucks, 104-88, behind another strong-armed effort from Dwight Howard. Howard had 31 points and 16 rebounds as the purple-and-gold streamers dropped from the Staples Center ceiling for a 12th time this season, way too infrequently for a team with such high hopes many, many months ago. The two reasons for their two-game winning streak after a six-game slide: Howard's offense and Kobe Bryant's defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2012 | By Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
Most afternoons, the 12 branches of the Long Beach Public Library are packed. Library officials say they've struggled - like other public libraries nationwide - to keep patrons' interest and stay relevant to residents in a digital world. But the library's literacy program has been especially popular since its implementation two years ago. The program dedicates computers, work space and assistance specifically to families looking to hunt for jobs, take English as a Second Language courses or work on homework.
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