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Homicide Movie

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May 11, 1991 | JACK MATHEWS
"Ah, c'mon. For God's sake, just a second, c'mon. Be like me." An hour into a luncheon with playwright-turned-filmmaker David Mamet, the brush-cut Chicago Jew cuts to the chase: Being Jewish in America is to constantly be asked to give it up, to--for God's sake--be like everybody else. "It's often very subtle, but it's also very troubling," said Mamet, here for the first time at the Cannes Film Festival to discuss his new movie, "Homicide," which opened the 11-day event Thursday night.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991 | JACK MATHEWS
"Ah, c'mon. For God's sake, just a second, c'mon. Be like me." An hour into a luncheon with playwright-turned-filmmaker David Mamet, the brush-cut Chicago Jew cuts to the chase: Being Jewish in America is to constantly be asked to give it up, to--for God's sake--be like everybody else. "It's often very subtle, but it's also very troubling," said Mamet, here for the first time at the Cannes Film Festival to discuss his new movie, "Homicide," which opened the 11-day event Thursday night.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Reunions rarely work in television, and NBC's "Homicide: The Movie" is no exception Sunday when briefly extending the life of one of prime time's finest. The sequel comes five months after "Homicide: Life on the Street" checked out after six distinguished years of telling smart, moving, at times profound stories about police detectives traveling the meanest streets of Baltimore. When we last saw their boss, imposing Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard De Angelis, 73, an actor best known for his role as Baltimore Police Maj. Raymond Foerster in the HBO series "The Wire," died Wednesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Silver Spring, Md. De Angelis also appeared as a hot dog vendor in the 1989 motion picture "Chances Are," as a witness in the 2000 film "Homicide: The Movie" and had larger roles in the John Waters films "Cecil B. Demented" in 2000 and "A Dirty Shame" in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | SHAUNA SNOW
MOVIES Firing Back: Sylvester Stallone and wife Jennifer Flavin filed a slander suit against two former household staffers on Thursday, days after the ex-workers filed their own suit alleging they were fired for breaking petty rules. "Mr. and Mrs. Stallone have filed this lawsuit to clear their name," said attorney Martin Singer, noting that the Santa Monica Superior Court suit seeks "no less than $1 million" from Maria Vivanco and Cristian Sandoval.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY and *--*
A barrage of sweeps-related programming caused viewing of the major networks to soar Sunday, while ABC rolled to its seventh-straight weekly victory behind the popularity of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," based on viewing estimates issued Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research. The four major networks totaled nearly 80 million viewers from 9 to 10 p.m.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
At first I thought it was merely a result of not having had to run a comb across my own scalp since the first Bush administration that I found David O. Russell's  “American Hustle” so follicularly fascinating - just watching the trailers I was mesmerized by Christian Bale's intricately disastrous comb-over, Bradley Cooper's poodle-curl perm and the tonsorial tower of power that somehow made Jeremy Renner look like the long-lost brother of SNL's...
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
February sweeps is jampacked with movies, miniseries, specials, as well as a celebration of Black History Month, as the networks try to boost viewership in one of the three tracking periods that help determine advertising rates. NBC has another fanciful miniseries, the Grammy Awards visit Los Angeles and cable elbows its way into the game with movies, such as a sweeping civil rights drama on TNT, and specials, such as the Discovery Channel's homage to man's best friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The afterlife: Expectations were sky high for the $125-million movie adaptation of Dan Brown's novel "The Da Vinci Code" when it was released in May, for myriad reasons. The religious thriller is the publishing phenomenon of the decade with some 60.5 million copies in print in 44 languages. Plus the film reunited Tom Hanks and director Ron Howard, who had collaborated on two critical and commercial successes: 1984's "Splash" and 1995's "Apollo 13."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Gwen Verdon, the brilliant Broadway dancer who won four Tony Awards within six years in the 1950s, died of natural causes at her daughter's home in Woodstock, Vt., Tuesday evening. She was 75. Verdon was best known for her work with the late choreographer Bob Fosse, who also became her husband. In recent years, she no longer danced publicly, but she kept the Fosse flame alive as a teacher and as an organizer of such projects as "Fosse," the dance revue that won the Tony for best musical in 1999.
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