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Honda Of America Manufacturing Inc

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BUSINESS
November 22, 1990 | From United Press International
Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. said Wednesday that employees at its assembly and engine plants in Ohio received an average of $1,712 per worker in profit-sharing checks, up slightly from year-ago payouts. The payments last week to Honda's 9,400 "associates"--which include non-union workers as well as management--is expected to be the highest in the industry, given the dismal financial performance posted so far this year by the nation's Big Three auto makers.
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BUSINESS
September 1, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
David Conant, Honda's highest-volume dealer, is eagerly awaiting Sept. 15, the day the first of the new generation of Civics arrive on his lots. There's a lot riding on the car. Honda is the house that Civic built in the United States, but in recent years the compact model has lost some of its of luster. "The old car had its shortcomings -- it lost its youth appeal," said Conant, whose holdings include the Norm Reeves Honda dealerships in Cerritos, Huntington Beach and West Covina.
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BUSINESS
September 1, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
David Conant, Honda's highest-volume dealer, is eagerly awaiting Sept. 15, the day the first of the new generation of Civics arrive on his lots. There's a lot riding on the car. Honda is the house that Civic built in the United States, but in recent years the compact model has lost some of its of luster. "The old car had its shortcomings -- it lost its youth appeal," said Conant, whose holdings include the Norm Reeves Honda dealerships in Cerritos, Huntington Beach and West Covina.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1990 | From United Press International
Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. said Wednesday that employees at its assembly and engine plants in Ohio received an average of $1,712 per worker in profit-sharing checks, up slightly from year-ago payouts. The payments last week to Honda's 9,400 "associates"--which include non-union workers as well as management--is expected to be the highest in the industry, given the dismal financial performance posted so far this year by the nation's Big Three auto makers.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Honda of America acknowledged Wednesday that it will pay $6 million to 377 blacks and women who were denied jobs at the company's three Ohio plants between 1983 and 1986. Honda settled the discrimination charges after a sweeping federal investigation into hiring practices at U.S. subsidiaries of major Japanese auto makers.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
It's been a month since Pam Richards turned down a Japanese car on an Ohio lottery TV show because the car wasn't union-made, and still the adulation continues. Talk about twin peaks. She's not only the heroine of American organized labor, she's the darling of the American auto industry. She's been given two new cars and a third is on the way. She's done more than 100 radio, television and newspaper interviews.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2004 | From Associated Press
Honda Motor Co.'s CR-V sport utility vehicle will be made for the first time in the United States at one of two Ohio plants, where five other Honda vehicles are manufactured. Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. said it wanted CR-V production to be closer to the SUV's buyers, most of whom live in the U.S. Production will begin in 2006 at one of two plants northwest of Columbus, in Marysville and East Liberty.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. will pay $6 million to 370 blacks and women who were not hired between 1983 and 1986, in a settlement of a federal discrimination investigation, the parties announced today. "The five-year agreement resolves an investigation of systemic discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964," Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Chairman Clarence Thomas said in a statement.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. is handing out average profit-sharing checks of $1,712 for each hourly and salaried worker, a company spokesman said today. The Big Three U.S. auto makers, meanwhile, forecast no such checks for their workers. About 9,400 workers at Honda's assembly and component factories in Marysville, East Liberty and Anna, Ohio, last week received the payments based on profits for the 1990 fiscal year, company spokesman Jeff Leestma said.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2005
* Nevada gambling regulators recommended approval for MGM Mirage Inc.'s plan to buy rival Mandalay Resort Group and create one of the world's largest gambling companies. * Occidental Petroleum Corp. of Los Angeles said reserves rose 2.8% last year as projects in the Middle East and Ecuador added to its holdings. * Countrywide Financial Corp., the biggest U.S. mortgage lender, said it was shifting a gain to the first quarter, reducing net income for 2004 by 5.2%.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
It's been a month since Pam Richards turned down a Japanese car on an Ohio lottery TV show because the car wasn't union-made, and still the adulation continues. Talk about twin peaks. She's not only the heroine of American organized labor, she's the darling of the American auto industry. She's been given two new cars and a third is on the way. She's done more than 100 radio, television and newspaper interviews.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Honda of America acknowledged Wednesday that it will pay $6 million to 377 blacks and women who were denied jobs at the company's three Ohio plants between 1983 and 1986. Honda settled the discrimination charges after a sweeping federal investigation into hiring practices at U.S. subsidiaries of major Japanese auto makers.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1993 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mazda Motor of America, which is eliminating a quarter of the remaining jobs at its Irvine headquarters, isn't the only auto maker resorting to layoffs to counter stalled sales. Automobile manufacturers around the world are "gearing up for competition in the international marketplace," said James M. Bills, an economist with Comerica Bank in Detroit. "It's a difficult adjustment, not only in this country, but in Japan and Europe as well." Mazda's U.S.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1985 | Associated Press
Unemployment lines bulged with veteran auto workers when Honda began building cars in America. But the company hired baby sitters, store clerks and farm hands to assemble Accords in rural Ohio. "I don't know of anyone here who ever built a car before," said Tim Garrett, a spokesman for Honda of America Manufacturing Inc., a subsidiary of Japan's Honda Motor Co. Ltd. Brent Miles, 25, was a jobless railroad-signal installer when he signed up. Russell Yocom, 21, was pumping gas for $3.
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