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Honduras Borders Nicaragua

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NEWS
March 23, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both the Sandinista army and the Contras gained strategic benefits from bloody battles at the Honduran border last week. As a result, each side is negotiating from an improved position in this week's peace talks, and neither side appears to be under increased military pressure to make concessions that might ease the way toward agreement. Sandinista troops struck a significant blow by driving hundreds of guerrillas out of jungle strongholds and across the Honduran border.
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NEWS
November 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The United Nations Security Council on Tuesday unanimously approved the creation of a multinational peacekeeping force in Central America, the first major U.N. operation in the Western Hemisphere. The United States voted in favor of the force, to be known as ONUCA, which grew from a regional peace accord signed in May at Tela, Honduras, by the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
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NEWS
September 3, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Defense Minister Humberto Ortega charged Friday that the Reagan Administration and the Contras are trying to provoke a clash between Nicaraguan and Honduran forces that would justify U.S. intervention against Nicaragua's Sandinista government. Ortega, brother of President Daniel Ortega, said that the Nicaraguan military is bracing "to counteract this danger of a greater conflict" and warned Contra soldiers camped in Honduras that they will be "annihilated" if they try to resume fighting.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
Honduras' armed forces cordoned off the frontier zone along the Nicaraguan border where about 10,000 U.S.-backed Contras are based to keep them from moving deeper inside Honduras, a military spokesman announced. And Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo said that if the Contras turned their guns toward Honduras instead of accepting a call from Central American presidents to disband, they would be dealt with severely.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
Honduras' armed forces cordoned off the frontier zone along the Nicaraguan border where about 10,000 U.S.-backed Contras are based to keep them from moving deeper inside Honduras, a military spokesman announced. And Honduran President Jose Azcona Hoyo said that if the Contras turned their guns toward Honduras instead of accepting a call from Central American presidents to disband, they would be dealt with severely.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The United Nations Security Council on Tuesday unanimously approved the creation of a multinational peacekeeping force in Central America, the first major U.N. operation in the Western Hemisphere. The United States voted in favor of the force, to be known as ONUCA, which grew from a regional peace accord signed in May at Tela, Honduras, by the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar on Monday named a four-member fact-finding mission to visit the Nicaraguan-Honduran border zone where Sandinista troops were reported to have clashed with Contras inside Honduras last week. The mission will leave New York today and return next weekend. Leading the group will be Gilberto Schlittler Silva, a Brazilian who is director-designate of Security Council affairs in the U.N. Secretariat.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
In response to pressure from the Honduran government, Nicaraguan rebel forces have opened a new supply base in a remote area of Olancho province and are scaling back operations in an area known as the Las Vegas salient, where Sandinista troops attacked them last year. The contras have also been shopping for farms in Olancho province, where their families could live and support themselves out of public view.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The demise of the Contras in neighboring Nicaragua is sending tremors of insecurity through Honduras, the U.S. ally that had staked the most on their rebellion. In a major retreat that could signal the war's end, about 10,000 Nicaraguan rebels have marched to base camps in Honduras with their families and civilian supporters since the cutoff of U.S. military aid and the collapse of peace talks with Nicaragua's Sandinista leaders earlier this year.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Army ferried 1,000 American and Honduran troops to a dusty airstrip for emergency maneuvers Sunday in a show of military muscle 15 miles from the Nicaraguan border. The soldiers and artillery were deployed here at the U.S.-built Jamastran airstrip, less than 100 miles west of the Nicaraguan border zone that Honduran warplanes bombed Saturday.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The demise of the Contras in neighboring Nicaragua is sending tremors of insecurity through Honduras, the U.S. ally that had staked the most on their rebellion. In a major retreat that could signal the war's end, about 10,000 Nicaraguan rebels have marched to base camps in Honduras with their families and civilian supporters since the cutoff of U.S. military aid and the collapse of peace talks with Nicaragua's Sandinista leaders earlier this year.
NEWS
September 3, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Defense Minister Humberto Ortega charged Friday that the Reagan Administration and the Contras are trying to provoke a clash between Nicaraguan and Honduran forces that would justify U.S. intervention against Nicaragua's Sandinista government. Ortega, brother of President Daniel Ortega, said that the Nicaraguan military is bracing "to counteract this danger of a greater conflict" and warned Contra soldiers camped in Honduras that they will be "annihilated" if they try to resume fighting.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Both the Sandinista army and the Contras gained strategic benefits from bloody battles at the Honduran border last week. As a result, each side is negotiating from an improved position in this week's peace talks, and neither side appears to be under increased military pressure to make concessions that might ease the way toward agreement. Sandinista troops struck a significant blow by driving hundreds of guerrillas out of jungle strongholds and across the Honduran border.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar on Monday named a four-member fact-finding mission to visit the Nicaraguan-Honduran border zone where Sandinista troops were reported to have clashed with Contras inside Honduras last week. The mission will leave New York today and return next weekend. Leading the group will be Gilberto Schlittler Silva, a Brazilian who is director-designate of Security Council affairs in the U.N. Secretariat.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Army ferried 1,000 American and Honduran troops to a dusty airstrip for emergency maneuvers Sunday in a show of military muscle 15 miles from the Nicaraguan border. The soldiers and artillery were deployed here at the U.S.-built Jamastran airstrip, less than 100 miles west of the Nicaraguan border zone that Honduran warplanes bombed Saturday.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
In response to pressure from the Honduran government, Nicaraguan rebel forces have opened a new supply base in a remote area of Olancho province and are scaling back operations in an area known as the Las Vegas salient, where Sandinista troops attacked them last year. The contras have also been shopping for farms in Olancho province, where their families could live and support themselves out of public view.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | From Reuters
President Bush said today he was asking U.S.-backed Nicaraguan Contras to give up their weapons in the long struggle against the leftist Sandinista government, and expressed confidence they will do so. Bush was asked by reporters if he is worried that the rebels might refuse to lay down their arms despite the election victory Sunday of U.S.-backed opposition leader Violeta Barrios de Chamorro over Nicaragua President Daniel Ortega.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Two Oklahoma men conspired to assassinate Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, claiming that an unidentified backer had put up $5 million to finance a paramilitary mission to Central America, federal authorities said in an indictment unsealed Thursday. The indictment said that one of the men contacted the office of Rep. Phillip M. Crane (R-Ill.) for information about travel restrictions to Honduras, which borders Nicaragua. But Crane and U.S.
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