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Honduras Elections

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NEWS
December 18, 1993 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he campaigned for the presidency of Honduras, Carlos Roberto Reina vowed to reform the powerful army, end the draft and remove the police from military control. He even hinted that he would trim the sacrosanct military budget. But within days of his landslide victory last month, Reina heard from the army that has dominated Honduras for decades. "No way," said the army's commander, Gen. Luis Discua, when asked about possible cuts in the estimated $40 million allotted the military annually.
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OPINION
November 24, 2013 | By Alexander Main
In June 2009, democracy, human rights and the rule of law were shattered in Honduras. Democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya was flown out of the country at gunpoint, and, in the days and months that followed, pro-democracy demonstrations were violently repressed and critical media outlets shut down. Elections organized a few months later under the coup regime did nothing to remedy the situation. Held in a climate of repression and boycotted by opposition groups, these elections were widely seen as illegitimate by many Hondurans and most governments in the hemisphere - with the notable exception of the United States.
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NEWS
December 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
A 47-year-old newspaper owner was leading in early vote counting and appeared likely to defeat the widow of a former military leader in Sunday's presidential election in Honduras. With about one-fourth of votes counted, Carlos Flores had 53% to 38% for Nora Gunera de Melgar. Three other parties' candidates split the remaining vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2009 | By Paloma Esquivel
While Honduras' de facto government observed elections more than 2,000 miles away on Sunday, Honduran citizens in Los Angeles headed to a local school to make their voices heard -- one way or another. Inside the Evans Community Adult School downtown, dozens of poll workers representing various political parties manned ballot stations. Across the street, protesters denounced what they called a fraudulent vote and urged a boycott. The presidential elections, which take place every four years, have been a source of tension since President Manuel Zelaya was ousted in a coup June 28 and deported to Costa Rica.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationalist Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas declared early today that he is the winner of this Central American nation's presidential race. Unofficial electoral results show that Callejas, a 46-year-old agricultural economist, had a safe lead of 6 to 9 percentage points against his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Facusse, of the ruling Liberal Party. The Liberals have governed Honduras for eight years, coming to power early in this decade after a series of military governments.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unofficial results in presidential voting in Honduras indicate a strong victory for National Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas, 46, a U.S.-educated agronomist who has advocated free-market cures for Honduras' moribund economy. With about 75% of the vote counted, radio reports give Callejas a commanding lead of about 6 percentage points over his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Sacusse of the ruling Liberal Party.
NEWS
November 29, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democracy is wearing a little thin in Honduras. After 16 years of civilian rule, the mere fact that they are able to vote for their president Sunday is no longer enough for the citizens of this Central American nation. They want real change and are becoming impatient with their political system's inability to provide it quickly enough.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | From Reuters
A congressional candidate from Honduras' main opposition party was killed early Saturday on the eve of general elections, underscoring a violent crime epidemic plaguing the Central American nation. Angel Pacheco, 44, of the opposition National Party was shot seven times by a man waiting outside his home about 12.30 a.m. in the city of Nacaome, 66 miles south of Tegucigalpa, the capital. Police said the slaying appeared to be politically motivated.
NEWS
November 23, 1993
Honduras holds presidential elections Sunday, after a negative campaign dedicated more to an exchange of insults between the two leading candidates than to issues. Oswaldo Ramos Soto of the ruling National Party and Carlos Roberto Reina of the Liberal Party are locked in a tight race to succeed President Rafael L. Callejas. Neither is expected to depart substantially from Callejas' centrist pro-business policies.
OPINION
November 24, 2013 | By Alexander Main
In June 2009, democracy, human rights and the rule of law were shattered in Honduras. Democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya was flown out of the country at gunpoint, and, in the days and months that followed, pro-democracy demonstrations were violently repressed and critical media outlets shut down. Elections organized a few months later under the coup regime did nothing to remedy the situation. Held in a climate of repression and boycotted by opposition groups, these elections were widely seen as illegitimate by many Hondurans and most governments in the hemisphere - with the notable exception of the United States.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | From Reuters
A congressional candidate from Honduras' main opposition party was killed early Saturday on the eve of general elections, underscoring a violent crime epidemic plaguing the Central American nation. Angel Pacheco, 44, of the opposition National Party was shot seven times by a man waiting outside his home about 12.30 a.m. in the city of Nacaome, 66 miles south of Tegucigalpa, the capital. Police said the slaying appeared to be politically motivated.
NEWS
December 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
A 47-year-old newspaper owner was leading in early vote counting and appeared likely to defeat the widow of a former military leader in Sunday's presidential election in Honduras. With about one-fourth of votes counted, Carlos Flores had 53% to 38% for Nora Gunera de Melgar. Three other parties' candidates split the remaining vote.
NEWS
November 29, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democracy is wearing a little thin in Honduras. After 16 years of civilian rule, the mere fact that they are able to vote for their president Sunday is no longer enough for the citizens of this Central American nation. They want real change and are becoming impatient with their political system's inability to provide it quickly enough.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he campaigned for the presidency of Honduras, Carlos Roberto Reina vowed to reform the powerful army, end the draft and remove the police from military control. He even hinted that he would trim the sacrosanct military budget. But within days of his landslide victory last month, Reina heard from the army that has dominated Honduras for decades. "No way," said the army's commander, Gen. Luis Discua, when asked about possible cuts in the estimated $40 million allotted the military annually.
NEWS
November 23, 1993
Honduras holds presidential elections Sunday, after a negative campaign dedicated more to an exchange of insults between the two leading candidates than to issues. Oswaldo Ramos Soto of the ruling National Party and Carlos Roberto Reina of the Liberal Party are locked in a tight race to succeed President Rafael L. Callejas. Neither is expected to depart substantially from Callejas' centrist pro-business policies.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unofficial results in presidential voting in Honduras indicate a strong victory for National Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas, 46, a U.S.-educated agronomist who has advocated free-market cures for Honduras' moribund economy. With about 75% of the vote counted, radio reports give Callejas a commanding lead of about 6 percentage points over his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Sacusse of the ruling Liberal Party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2009 | By Paloma Esquivel
While Honduras' de facto government observed elections more than 2,000 miles away on Sunday, Honduran citizens in Los Angeles headed to a local school to make their voices heard -- one way or another. Inside the Evans Community Adult School downtown, dozens of poll workers representing various political parties manned ballot stations. Across the street, protesters denounced what they called a fraudulent vote and urged a boycott. The presidential elections, which take place every four years, have been a source of tension since President Manuel Zelaya was ousted in a coup June 28 and deported to Costa Rica.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationalist Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas declared early today that he is the winner of this Central American nation's presidential race. Unofficial electoral results show that Callejas, a 46-year-old agricultural economist, had a safe lead of 6 to 9 percentage points against his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Facusse, of the ruling Liberal Party. The Liberals have governed Honduras for eight years, coming to power early in this decade after a series of military governments.
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