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NEWS
November 14, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
For 10 days in mid-October, plain-clothed gunmen prowling in pickup trucks with dark windows and no license plates terrified Honduras' fourth-largest city. One by one, they seized seven men from poor barrios--reliable workers with no known politics or police records. Amid an outcry by human rights activists and the victims' mothers, authorities for weeks denied holding the men.
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NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Honduran government announced that it will pay $2.1 million to the families of 19 of the 184 political activists kidnapped and killed by an army death squad in the 1980s. Acting on a recommendation by the Organization of American States, Honduras said similar payments will be offered to the rest of those whose relatives "disappeared" in connection with the army's Counterinsurgency Battalion 316.
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NEWS
April 16, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
For the men in Ronald Reagan's White House whose mission was to keep the Nicaraguan rebels fighting, the first weeks of 1985 were a time of creeping desperation. Congress had cut off the CIA's covert military aid to the Contras. Stopgap aid from Saudi Arabia and Israel was beginning to run low. And then came what looked like a potential last straw: Honduras, where the main Contra army was camped, threatened to disarm the rebels and halt their military operations against Nicaragua.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos. Fransisco. Rene Pinto Polaco. Prisoner Sauceda. Mario was here. Carved roughly into the bricks of an abandoned jail cell a few yards from an airstrip that U.S. forces built in 1983, the names symbolize the mystery of El Aguacate. The United States used this air base in eastern Honduras to supply and train Nicaraguan counterrevolutionaries, known as Contras, fighting their country's leftist Sandinista government in the 1980s.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The day he died, Gustavo Alvarez Martinez awoke before dawn, entered his study and opened a Bible. Spreading his hands over a map of Honduras, he prayed for his people: "Blessed is the nation whose God is Jehovah." As military commander in chief from 1982 to 1984, Gen. Alvarez was a powerful U.S. ally who battled communism by force of arms. He waged a fierce counterinsurgency campaign at home, helped launch the war by U.S.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From Reuters
This Central American nation will forge ahead with a plan for the disbanding of U.S.-backed Nicaraguan Contras despite President Bush's insistence that the rebel army not be demobilized until there is democracy in Nicaragua, a senior official said Friday. "We respect the point of view of the U.S. government, but President (Jose) Azcona (Hoyo) has expressed very clearly that he will follow his own interests," Honduran Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras told reporters.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he campaigned for the presidency of Honduras, Carlos Roberto Reina vowed to reform the powerful army, end the draft and remove the police from military control. He even hinted that he would trim the sacrosanct military budget. But within days of his landslide victory last month, Reina heard from the army that has dominated Honduras for decades. "No way," said the army's commander, Gen. Luis Discua, when asked about possible cuts in the estimated $40 million allotted the military annually.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationalist Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas declared early today that he is the winner of this Central American nation's presidential race. Unofficial electoral results show that Callejas, a 46-year-old agricultural economist, had a safe lead of 6 to 9 percentage points against his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Facusse, of the ruling Liberal Party. The Liberals have governed Honduras for eight years, coming to power early in this decade after a series of military governments.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to an army occupation of the company town of La Lima and its sprawling plantations, Honduras' banana workers union accepted a government-proposed wage boost and returned to work Monday, ending a seven-week strike against a giant multinational fruit grower. The settlement Sunday night was a relief not only for Honduras' premier private employer, Chiquita Brands International, but also for the civilian government of President Rafael L.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | Reuters
The Honduran government will open the U.S.-built Palmerola Air Base for public use, Honduran Vice President Roberto Martinez said Monday. A U.S. Embassy spokesman said that the decision to convert the airport, currently used only by the Honduran and U.S. military, should be left to Honduras.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When he campaigned for the presidency of Honduras, Carlos Roberto Reina vowed to reform the powerful army, end the draft and remove the police from military control. He even hinted that he would trim the sacrosanct military budget. But within days of his landslide victory last month, Reina heard from the army that has dominated Honduras for decades. "No way," said the army's commander, Gen. Luis Discua, when asked about possible cuts in the estimated $40 million allotted the military annually.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing to an army occupation of the company town of La Lima and its sprawling plantations, Honduras' banana workers union accepted a government-proposed wage boost and returned to work Monday, ending a seven-week strike against a giant multinational fruit grower. The settlement Sunday night was a relief not only for Honduras' premier private employer, Chiquita Brands International, but also for the civilian government of President Rafael L.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reeling from Honduras' costliest labor feud in 36 years, the civilian government sent army troops onto banana plantations and censored radio broadcasts Sunday to help an American multinational fruit company end a seven-week-old strike by 10,000 workers. Two workers and an undercover police officer were wounded outside the Chiquita Brands headquarters here when a soldier fired his machine gun into an angry crowd Saturday night.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | Reuters
The Honduran government will open the U.S.-built Palmerola Air Base for public use, Honduran Vice President Roberto Martinez said Monday. A U.S. Embassy spokesman said that the decision to convert the airport, currently used only by the Honduran and U.S. military, should be left to Honduras.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nationalist Party candidate Rafael Leonardo Callejas declared early today that he is the winner of this Central American nation's presidential race. Unofficial electoral results show that Callejas, a 46-year-old agricultural economist, had a safe lead of 6 to 9 percentage points against his chief rival, Carlos Roberto Flores Facusse, of the ruling Liberal Party. The Liberals have governed Honduras for eight years, coming to power early in this decade after a series of military governments.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | From Reuters
This Central American nation will forge ahead with a plan for the disbanding of U.S.-backed Nicaraguan Contras despite President Bush's insistence that the rebel army not be demobilized until there is democracy in Nicaragua, a senior official said Friday. "We respect the point of view of the U.S. government, but President (Jose) Azcona (Hoyo) has expressed very clearly that he will follow his own interests," Honduran Foreign Minister Carlos Lopez Contreras told reporters.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reeling from Honduras' costliest labor feud in 36 years, the civilian government sent army troops onto banana plantations and censored radio broadcasts Sunday to help an American multinational fruit company end a seven-week-old strike by 10,000 workers. Two workers and an undercover police officer were wounded outside the Chiquita Brands headquarters here when a soldier fired his machine gun into an angry crowd Saturday night.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Honduran government announced that it will pay $2.1 million to the families of 19 of the 184 political activists kidnapped and killed by an army death squad in the 1980s. Acting on a recommendation by the Organization of American States, Honduras said similar payments will be offered to the rest of those whose relatives "disappeared" in connection with the army's Counterinsurgency Battalion 316.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
For the men in Ronald Reagan's White House whose mission was to keep the Nicaraguan rebels fighting, the first weeks of 1985 were a time of creeping desperation. Congress had cut off the CIA's covert military aid to the Contras. Stopgap aid from Saudi Arabia and Israel was beginning to run low. And then came what looked like a potential last straw: Honduras, where the main Contra army was camped, threatened to disarm the rebels and halt their military operations against Nicaragua.
NEWS
February 25, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The day he died, Gustavo Alvarez Martinez awoke before dawn, entered his study and opened a Bible. Spreading his hands over a map of Honduras, he prayed for his people: "Blessed is the nation whose God is Jehovah." As military commander in chief from 1982 to 1984, Gen. Alvarez was a powerful U.S. ally who battled communism by force of arms. He waged a fierce counterinsurgency campaign at home, helped launch the war by U.S.
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