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Honduras Labor

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NEWS
October 27, 1988 | From Reuters
About 40,000 Honduran civil servants began an indefinite national strike on Wednesday, their first in 50 years, to press for wage raises and job stability, organizers said. Civil servants' leader Obdulio Cheves told reporters that the strike has hit almost all ministries and will continue until the government issues a law guaranteeing work stability and regular wage rises.
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NEWS
October 30, 1988
Tens of thousands of public employees in Honduras rejected a presidential order and an appeal by lawmakers to end a nationwide strike that has paralyzed government operations and shut down hospitals and schools. The 60,000-member Public Employees Assn. vowed to continue the strike until the government agrees to provide better pay and benefits. Last week, President Jose Azcona Hoyo declared the first-ever nationwide walkout by government employees illegal and ordered them back to work.
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NEWS
October 30, 1988
Tens of thousands of public employees in Honduras rejected a presidential order and an appeal by lawmakers to end a nationwide strike that has paralyzed government operations and shut down hospitals and schools. The 60,000-member Public Employees Assn. vowed to continue the strike until the government agrees to provide better pay and benefits. Last week, President Jose Azcona Hoyo declared the first-ever nationwide walkout by government employees illegal and ordered them back to work.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | From Reuters
About 40,000 Honduran civil servants began an indefinite national strike on Wednesday, their first in 50 years, to press for wage raises and job stability, organizers said. Civil servants' leader Obdulio Cheves told reporters that the strike has hit almost all ministries and will continue until the government issues a law guaranteeing work stability and regular wage rises.
FOOD
July 27, 1995 | RUSS PARSONS
If you buy bananas at all--and evidence suggests you probably do--you probably tend to pick them up and stick them in your shopping basket without really noticing the price. Bananas are grocery store staples, like bleach and toilet paper. In fact, so many people bought bananas last week that they outweighed every other fruit or vegetable that moved through the giant Los Angeles Terminal Market, the central clearinghouse for produce in Southern California.
NEWS
August 6, 1990 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reeling from Honduras' costliest labor feud in 36 years, the civilian government sent army troops onto banana plantations and censored radio broadcasts Sunday to help an American multinational fruit company end a seven-week-old strike by 10,000 workers. Two workers and an undercover police officer were wounded outside the Chiquita Brands headquarters here when a soldier fired his machine gun into an angry crowd Saturday night.
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