Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHonduras Revolts
IN THE NEWS

Honduras Revolts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 11, 1988
A Honduran newspaper reported fighting in Honduras between Nicaraguan rebel factions divided over military chief Enrique Bermudez, but a Contra spokesman denied the report. The daily El Heraldo reported that two rebels were injured Sunday in Honduran territory in a clash between rebels loyal to Bermudez and those calling for his ouster. However, Contra spokesman Bosco Matamoros denied the reports. "Someone is trying to create a shipwreck atmosphere," he told Reuters news agency.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 30, 2009
Latin Americans suffered at least three dozen military coups d'etat from the 1960s through the end of the 20th century.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 14, 1989
THE KEY CONFLICTS Guatemala--Leftist rebels, active since 1960s, reduced to isolated zones but still fighting. Talks proposed by government have collapsed; no new talks planned. Honduras--Several thousand rebels, opposed to Nicaraguan government, encamped in south. Persistent source of tension with Nicaragua, which sent troops across border in 1986 and March, 1988. El Salvador--Leftist guerrillas, fighting U.S.-backed government for nine years, declared truce for current summit. On Jan.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Honduran government announced that it will pay $2.1 million to the families of 19 of the 184 political activists kidnapped and killed by an army death squad in the 1980s. Acting on a recommendation by the Organization of American States, Honduras said similar payments will be offered to the rest of those whose relatives "disappeared" in connection with the army's Counterinsurgency Battalion 316.
NEWS
March 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Soldiers and police raided the hideout of a small leftist rebel organization in northern Honduras and killed two of the group's leaders in a gun battle, the army announced. An army communique identified the slain guerrillas as Jose Nolasco, 30, and Hilda Rosa Lopez Cerrato, 20, leaders of the Popular Revolutionary Forces. It said the raid occurred Friday in San Pedro Sula.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Unidentified assailants ambushed a U.S. military convoy, raking it with gunfire and disabling a jeep with an explosive, but no casualties were reported, a U.S. Embassy spokesman said. The attack Tuesday in northern Honduras was the third this year on U.S. troops in the country. The caravan of 11 jeeps was hit as it carried supplies to troops taking part in military exercises, said the spokesman, Charles V. Barclay. He said 14 U.S. and six Honduran soldiers were in the vehicles.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Honduran government announced that it will pay $2.1 million to the families of 19 of the 184 political activists kidnapped and killed by an army death squad in the 1980s. Acting on a recommendation by the Organization of American States, Honduras said similar payments will be offered to the rest of those whose relatives "disappeared" in connection with the army's Counterinsurgency Battalion 316.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos. Fransisco. Rene Pinto Polaco. Prisoner Sauceda. Mario was here. Carved roughly into the bricks of an abandoned jail cell a few yards from an airstrip that U.S. forces built in 1983, the names symbolize the mystery of El Aguacate. The United States used this air base in eastern Honduras to supply and train Nicaraguan counterrevolutionaries, known as Contras, fighting their country's leftist Sandinista government in the 1980s.
NEWS
February 12, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick Carney and his brother James became priests to help the poor, and both ran headlong into a wall of church conservatism. Patrick gave up and married. James embraced a controversial, radical doctrine as a missionary, earning the love of his peasant flock and the wrath of the Honduran army. One day, during the dregs of America's tropical Cold War, Father James Carney marched into the jungle with an ill-starred column of leftist guerrillas.
OPINION
June 30, 2009
Latin Americans suffered at least three dozen military coups d'etat from the 1960s through the end of the 20th century.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carlos. Fransisco. Rene Pinto Polaco. Prisoner Sauceda. Mario was here. Carved roughly into the bricks of an abandoned jail cell a few yards from an airstrip that U.S. forces built in 1983, the names symbolize the mystery of El Aguacate. The United States used this air base in eastern Honduras to supply and train Nicaraguan counterrevolutionaries, known as Contras, fighting their country's leftist Sandinista government in the 1980s.
NEWS
February 12, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrick Carney and his brother James became priests to help the poor, and both ran headlong into a wall of church conservatism. Patrick gave up and married. James embraced a controversial, radical doctrine as a missionary, earning the love of his peasant flock and the wrath of the Honduran army. One day, during the dregs of America's tropical Cold War, Father James Carney marched into the jungle with an ill-starred column of leftist guerrillas.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Unidentified assailants ambushed a U.S. military convoy, raking it with gunfire and disabling a jeep with an explosive, but no casualties were reported, a U.S. Embassy spokesman said. The attack Tuesday in northern Honduras was the third this year on U.S. troops in the country. The caravan of 11 jeeps was hit as it carried supplies to troops taking part in military exercises, said the spokesman, Charles V. Barclay. He said 14 U.S. and six Honduran soldiers were in the vehicles.
NEWS
February 14, 1989
THE KEY CONFLICTS Guatemala--Leftist rebels, active since 1960s, reduced to isolated zones but still fighting. Talks proposed by government have collapsed; no new talks planned. Honduras--Several thousand rebels, opposed to Nicaraguan government, encamped in south. Persistent source of tension with Nicaragua, which sent troops across border in 1986 and March, 1988. El Salvador--Leftist guerrillas, fighting U.S.-backed government for nine years, declared truce for current summit. On Jan.
NEWS
May 11, 1988
A Honduran newspaper reported fighting in Honduras between Nicaraguan rebel factions divided over military chief Enrique Bermudez, but a Contra spokesman denied the report. The daily El Heraldo reported that two rebels were injured Sunday in Honduran territory in a clash between rebels loyal to Bermudez and those calling for his ouster. However, Contra spokesman Bosco Matamoros denied the reports. "Someone is trying to create a shipwreck atmosphere," he told Reuters news agency.
NEWS
March 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Soldiers and police raided the hideout of a small leftist rebel organization in northern Honduras and killed two of the group's leaders in a gun battle, the army announced. An army communique identified the slain guerrillas as Jose Nolasco, 30, and Hilda Rosa Lopez Cerrato, 20, leaders of the Popular Revolutionary Forces. It said the raid occurred Friday in San Pedro Sula.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|