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Honduras Security

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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The demise of the Contras in neighboring Nicaragua is sending tremors of insecurity through Honduras, the U.S. ally that had staked the most on their rebellion. In a major retreat that could signal the war's end, about 10,000 Nicaraguan rebels have marched to base camps in Honduras with their families and civilian supporters since the cutoff of U.S. military aid and the collapse of peace talks with Nicaragua's Sandinista leaders earlier this year.
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WORLD
October 1, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Soldiers and police enforced an emergency decree suspending civil liberties despite promises by the coup-imposed government to lift the measures criticized by its own allies as going too far. About 150 police officers and soldiers acting on the decree raided the offices of the National Agrarian Institute, occupied by supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya since the June 28 coup. Authorities detained 54 farm activists and Zelaya supporters, police spokesman Orlin Cerrato said.
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WORLD
October 1, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Soldiers and police enforced an emergency decree suspending civil liberties despite promises by the coup-imposed government to lift the measures criticized by its own allies as going too far. About 150 police officers and soldiers acting on the decree raided the offices of the National Agrarian Institute, occupied by supporters of ousted President Manuel Zelaya since the June 28 coup. Authorities detained 54 farm activists and Zelaya supporters, police spokesman Orlin Cerrato said.
SPORTS
November 12, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more than 100,000 fans providing thunderous support, Mexico on Sunday completed a fairy-tale comeback from the abyss of elimination and qualified for the 2002 World Cup soccer tournament with a 3-0 victory over Honduras. After a scoreless first half, Mexican forward Cuauhtemoc Blanco broke through with the decisive goal in the 66th minute. Six minutes later, forward Juan Francisco Palencia added a second goal, and Blanco scored the last goal in the 79th minute on a penalty kick.
SPORTS
November 12, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With more than 100,000 fans providing thunderous support, Mexico on Sunday completed a fairy-tale comeback from the abyss of elimination and qualified for the 2002 World Cup soccer tournament with a 3-0 victory over Honduras. After a scoreless first half, Mexican forward Cuauhtemoc Blanco broke through with the decisive goal in the 66th minute. Six minutes later, forward Juan Francisco Palencia added a second goal, and Blanco scored the last goal in the 79th minute on a penalty kick.
WORLD
August 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Honduras tightened security at foreign embassies and declared a terror alert after receiving information that Al Qaeda was trying to recruit Hondurans to attack embassies of the U.S., Britain, Spain and El Salvador. Security Minister Oscar Alvarez said some Hondurans had been offered money to carry out attacks and others had been approached on ideological grounds. Honduras has a tiny Islamic community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1985
U.S. relations with Honduras, until now the Reagan Administration's staunchest Central American ally, have been strained lately--one more sign that Washington's military-oriented strategy in that unsettled region is doomed to failure and must be changed. Honduran political and military leaders are now resisting the role that they have been assigned by White House and Defense Department strategists, a mission described by one Honduran as serving as "just one big military base."
NEWS
March 16, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Honduras are drafting a joint declaration that will emphasize an American military commitment to defend Honduras if it is attacked. The declaration--like today's scheduled visit to Honduras by Vice President George Bush--is intended to help smooth the Reagan Administration's friendly but frayed relations with this strategic Central American country. Sources close to the negotiations on the declaration say it will be ready for signing in two or three months.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
President Daniel Ortega on Saturday announced his support for the latest draft of a proposed Central American peace treaty, but the announcement is not expected to break a stalemate in the Contadora Group's 3 1/2-year search for a settlement of Central American conflicts. Costa Rica, Honduras and El Salvador, the principal U.S. allies in the region, have already criticized the draft as unacceptably flawed.
NEWS
May 10, 1986 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
The state Military Department reversed itself Friday and confirmed that a California National Guardsman participated in a midnight shooting incident while on sentry duty in a Honduras jungle last month. Col. Donald J. Foley, a spokesman for the California guard, said the guardsman fired three "warning shots" into the air when someone with a "moving light" in the jungle darkness refused to obey commands to halt.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The demise of the Contras in neighboring Nicaragua is sending tremors of insecurity through Honduras, the U.S. ally that had staked the most on their rebellion. In a major retreat that could signal the war's end, about 10,000 Nicaraguan rebels have marched to base camps in Honduras with their families and civilian supporters since the cutoff of U.S. military aid and the collapse of peace talks with Nicaragua's Sandinista leaders earlier this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2005 | Rich Connell and Robert J. Lopez, Times Staff Writers
As part of a nationwide crackdown, federal authorities Monday announced 103 arrests in six major cities of members of Mara Salvatrucha, an international gang born in Los Angeles and now involved in murder, narcotics trafficking and human smuggling.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The day before he died, Martin Martinez, 17, told his mother the Sandinistas were after him. He would go into hiding, he promised, as soon as he brought in the bean crop. The youth's ordeal had begun when Contras seized him two years ago as an alleged Sandinista informer. He had escaped, only to be harassed by state security agents seeking hidden weapons and information about his brother, a Contra foot soldier. Last Nov. 22, months after the fighting subsided, the delicate balance of forces and fate that had allowed Martin to survive in this war zone collapsed.
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