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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2003 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
The party invitation says it all: Life Is Sweet Again at Bennett's Honey Farm. And so it is for Red and Ann Bennett, who are preparing for the grand opening Saturday) of their new honey production plant, nestled among the fragrant orange groves of the Santa Clara Valley near Piru. Since fire destroyed their old facility more than two years ago, they have operated out of a mothballed egg ranch near Moorpark.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California beekeepers managed to pump out enough nectar last year to reestablish the Golden State as the nation's top honey producer. But at honeybee farms throughout the state, there has been little comfort in recapturing the crown. Though honey prices are higher than they've been in years, the industry faces a swarm of troubles, from cutthroat competition by foreign exporters to voracious pests that can gut production and drive beekeepers out of business.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When this summer rolls around in Southern California, the season may bring more than hot weather and bougainvillea. Migrating steadily northward for years, swarms of Africanized "killer" bees have crossed the Rio Grande into Texas. Large colonies have already been spotted in Arizona and are expected to reach California this fall, perhaps sooner. American authorities are waging war at the front, trying desperately to trap and kill the winged aliens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2011
Shelagh Delaney Playwright wrote 'A Taste of Honey' Playwright Shelagh Delaney, 71, best known for her 1958 play "A Taste of Honey," died of cancer Sunday at her daughter's home in England, said her agent, Jane Villiers. Born Nov. 25, 1939, in England, Delaney was the daughter of a bus inspector, and her early work was rooted in her hometown of Salford, an industrial suburb of Manchester. Delaney later said she wrote "A Taste of Honey" in response to her dissatisfaction with contemporary theater and the unrealistic dialogue she heard there.
IMAGE
June 13, 2010 | By Kavita Daswani, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For the latest in beauty, people are turning to two places: their refrigerators and the Amazon rain forest. In what is the antithesis of high-science beauty products, a current crop is based almost entirely on food — from everyday ingredients such as yogurt, honey and cucumber to more exotic things like acerola, buriti oil, pomegranate seeds and murumuru butter. Some of the products are designed to be so fresh that they need to be stored in the refrigerator and used quickly.
WORLD
December 19, 2005 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
On a good day in the jungle, honey hunters' biggest worry is the sting of a giant bee that burns like a red-hot needle. But on other days, they face something far more deadly: Bengal tigers up to 10 feet long that lie silently in ambush, baring canine teeth as big as spikes, hungry for the taste of people. "Human flesh is sweet.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | MATTHEW MOSK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Crouching into the cab of her beat-up yellow truck, beekeeper Ann Bennett performed the meticulous task of transferring pinhead-size queen bee larvae into new hives. As she carried out this yearly ritual, deep within an orange grove, Bennett comforted the tiny insects. "Don't worry," she said softly. "There are good things in store for you. Soon you'll be a queen."
BUSINESS
May 26, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
The research institution that brought you the fax machine and GPS has come up with another potentially world-changing invention: a bottle coating so slick that every last bit of ketchup slides out quickly and easily. In what could be a disruptive technology for the ketchup industry, an MIT professor has found a solution to getting the last clingy globs of ketchup (or honey or jelly) out of a bottle. No word yet on how it could affect ketchup sales, but the technology uses a new type of food-grade coating that has the slipperiness of a liquid but the rigidity of a solid.
FOOD
December 22, 2012 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
Panforte 's name translates to "strong bread," but it is more confection than cake or bread, barely bound with flour and heavy with preserved fruit and honey that dissolve together as they cook. It's studded with toasted nuts and spiced with black pepper, cloves, coriander, nutmeg, cinnamon and cocoa. Maybe it's because panforte is so often compared with fruitcake and confused with panettone - the raisin- and candied fruit-studded, brioche-like Italian bread - that we don't see enough of the traditional Tuscan cake during the holidays.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Israel is referred to repeatedly in the Bible — 17 times, in fact — as the "land of milk and honey," but until three years ago, archaeologists had discovered little firm evidence that beekeeping was ever practiced there. Many scholars, in fact, assumed "honey" referred to a nectar from dates or other fruits. Then, three years ago, researchers found a 3,000-year-old apiary in the Iron Age city of Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest known commercial beekeeping facility in the world, suggesting that the word "honey" likely referred to the real thing.
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