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BUSINESS
September 8, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Wireless Internet access on planes has become so essential that some travelers are willing to give up comfort, sustenance and even peace and quiet to get it. For example, 61% of fliers who were questioned said having no Wi-Fi on a flight was worse than sitting in a seat that doesn't recline, according to a survey of more than 2,000 adult Americans conducted on behalf of Honeywell Aerospace, a division of Honeywell Inc. That same survey found...
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BUSINESS
December 2, 1989 | From United Press International
Honeywell Inc. has agreed in principle to sell its Electro-Optics Division to Loral Corp. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed. Honeywell's Electro-Optics Division, which has its headquarters in Lexington, Mass., employs about 1,200 people. It specializes in the design and manufacture of infrared imaging components for military markets.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
Los Angeles is the second-most-populous city in the nation but falls far down the list of most popular U.S. destinations for business meetings. The latest ranking of top meeting destinations puts Los Angeles at No. 17, far behind smaller California cities such as San Diego and San Francisco, according to Cvent Inc., one of the nation's largest convention management and technology firms. The top meeting destination for 2013 was Orlando, Fla., followed by Chicago, Las Vegas, Atlanta and San Diego, according to Cvent, which ranked the cities based on room nights reserved, available meeting venues and other criteria.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Honeywell Chairman to Have Heart Surgery: James Renier, chairman and chief executive of Honeywell Inc., is to undergo heart bypass surgery today, the company said. Renier, 62, has been treated over the last 11 years for a heart ailment, and the non-emergency bypass surgery is part of that treatment, the company said. At the request of Renier and his doctor, Honeywell spokesman Kevin Whalen did not elaborate on the nature of Renier's ailment.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Honeywell to Acquire Duracraft: Honeywell Inc. agreed to buy the nation's biggest maker of fans and heaters for $283 million to widen its line of home climate-control products and boost foreign sales. Southborough, Mass.-based Duracraft Corp. sells more than 60 types of fans and heaters, plus humidifiers and air cleaners. The company will become part of Minneapolis-based Honeywell's home and building controls unit.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich took administrative action against Honeywell Inc., ruling that the firm discriminated against women in its hiring and promotion practices in the 1970s. Ruling on a case that was brought by Labor Department investigators in 1977, Reich said he had determined that Honeywell discriminated against thousands of women at offices, warehouses and factories around its Minneapolis-St. Paul base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Edson Spencer, who as head of Honeywell Inc. first battled IBM's dominance of the computer market in the 1980s, then gave in and focused his company on automation and aerospace technology, has died. He was 85. He died Sunday at his home in Wayzata, Minn., after battling progressive supranuclear palsy, a neurodegenerative brain disease, his family said. In his 34-year career at Honeywell — known as Honeywell International Inc. since its acquisition in 1999 by AlliedSignal Inc. — Spencer rose from an aeronautical engineer to the company's chief executive from 1974 to 1987.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2009 | Ralph Vartabedian
Under a federal program to transform government facilities into models of energy efficiency, Honeywell International Inc. came calling on Army commanders here with a deal to replace the base's decades-old steam power plant. The company proposed installing millions of dollars in new heating equipment and hooking the base to the local power grid -- all free in exchange for the company getting the bulk of future energy savings. It was precisely the kind of deal that politicians and bureaucrats in Washington were pushing at facilities across the country -- modernizing aging machinery without the government spending any money of its own. But today, the Ft. Richardson deal, one of the largest among hundreds of similar contracts, has sunk into a morass of accounting disputes and allegations of misconduct.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2001 | Bloomberg News
HCA Inc.'s third-quarter profit rose 47% as the biggest U.S. hospital chain attracted more patients and raised the prices it charges managed-care insurers. Net income rose to $256 million, or 48 cents a share, from $174 million, or 31 cents, a year earlier, the company said. Revenue rose 8.4% to $4.44 billion. Some investors were disappointed that profit only matched analysts' estimates, sending HCA's shares down 5.7%.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | CAROL WOLF, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Honeywell International Inc. will consolidate operations into four units, as Chief Executive Lawrence Bossidy moves to reduce costs after General Electric Co.'s planned purchase of the company collapsed. Chief Operating Officer Giannantonio Ferrari will retire immediately, spokesman Tom Crane said. Estimates weren't available about how much will be saved by combining the eight divisions into aerospace, automation and controls, specialty materials, and transportation and power units, Crane said.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through their different political, economic and legal lenses, U.S. and European antitrust regulators occasionally see the risks and rewards of mergers very differently. Nowhere is that difference more visible than in the proposed linking of General Electric Co. and Honeywell Inc.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Honeywell International Corp. on Monday reaffirmed its full commitment to its troubled deal with General Electric Co., despite objections by European Union regulators with competition concerns about the $41-billion merger. Honeywell's board of directors "expects that GE will do everything possible to secure regulatory approval for the transaction," the company said in a statement after the board of directors met at the company's Morris Township, N.J., headquarters.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN
General Electric's pending $54-billion takeover of fellow Dow Jones industrial average component Honeywell will present the keepers of the Dow index with a slot to fill. Changes in the 30-stock Dow are relatively rare, because Dow Jones & Co. emphasizes the index's long history (dating back to 1896) and continuity. But like the Standard & Poor's 500, the Dow has gained more tech members in recent years.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | Reuters
General Electric Co., moving with lightning speed, sealed a deal Saturday to buy aircraft electronics giant Honeywell International Inc., sources familiar with the situation said. It was not immediately clear how much Fairfield, Conn.-based GE had agreed to pay. United Technologies Corp. had offered about $40 billion in stock for Honeywell before its merger talks broke down Friday after GE expressed interest. GE and Honeywell could not be reached immediately for comment.
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