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Hong Kong Agriculture

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NEWS
March 11, 2001 | MARGARET WONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Camouflaged in reeds and sedges, environmental workers quietly gaze upon a rare sight: dozens of black-faced spoonbills napping in the morning after feeding on fish and shrimp at dawn. When the large white birds with black faces and feet wake up, they wade in shallow water or tideland, swinging their long, flat, spoon-shaped bills left and right as they look for another catch in one of the few remaining areas of Hong Kong untouched by development.
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NEWS
May 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Buddhist monks chanted and prayed as Hong Kong continued its mass slaughter of chickens, ducks and pigeons in an attempt to stamp out avian influenza. Monks held a ritual to pacify the souls of the birds. About 140,000 were killed Sunday at more than 130 markets in the Chinese territory. The slaughter of 1.2 million birds is expected to take six weeks. Officials call it a necessary precaution even though the disease has not affected humans.
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NEWS
May 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Buddhist monks chanted and prayed as Hong Kong continued its mass slaughter of chickens, ducks and pigeons in an attempt to stamp out avian influenza. Monks held a ritual to pacify the souls of the birds. About 140,000 were killed Sunday at more than 130 markets in the Chinese territory. The slaughter of 1.2 million birds is expected to take six weeks. Officials call it a necessary precaution even though the disease has not affected humans.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | MARGARET WONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Camouflaged in reeds and sedges, environmental workers quietly gaze upon a rare sight: dozens of black-faced spoonbills napping in the morning after feeding on fish and shrimp at dawn. When the large white birds with black faces and feet wake up, they wade in shallow water or tideland, swinging their long, flat, spoon-shaped bills left and right as they look for another catch in one of the few remaining areas of Hong Kong untouched by development.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994
The British colony has long been a thriving free market economy, which has prompted some worries about how the pending takeove by China will impact on one of Asia's largest economies. Under an agreement signed with the British in 1984, the colony in 1997 reverts to Beijing control after 99 years of British rule. THE ECONOMY: With limited national resources, Hong Kong depends on imports for virtually all of its requirements, including raw materials, food and other consumer goods and fuel.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | VICTORIA McGLOTHREN, REUTERS
Hong Kong, which imports most of its fresh vegetables and poultry from China, has to go farther afield for chicken feet, Chinese cuisine's crunchiest, boniest staple. "One chicken has only two feet, so we have to import," said Humphrey Shi of Hong Kong's Agriculture and Fisheries Department.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having determined that poultry farms in China are the "probable" source of a mysterious flu virus that has caused four human deaths here, Hong Kong authorities Tuesday said they would extend a ban on Chinese bird shipments and impose stringent quarantines and testing procedures before new imports will be permitted.
OPINION
December 13, 2005 | PAUL WOLFOWITZ, PAUL WOLFOWITZ is president of the World Bank
THIS WEEK, trade ministers from 148 nations are gathering in Hong Kong for negotiations hosted by the World Trade Organization, the latest in the so-called Doha development round that started in Doha, Qatar, four years ago. The aim of these negotiations has been to liberalize trade -- especially to open the world's richest markets to the world's poorest producers of goods and services. And the crucial issue in Hong Kong is agriculture.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2005 | Don Lee and Kim Christensen, Times Staff Writers
Walt Disney Co.'s new theme park here is said to be lucky, nestled as it is between one hill shaped like a white tiger and another that resembles a dragon. But when its fabled Imagineers set out to create Hong Kong Disneyland, there were a few things even they could not foresee -- things like beetles chomping on the hotel furniture, environmentalists putting the bite on plans for shark fin soup and wild dogs coming down from the hills to menace the newest House of Mouse.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In late March, chickens began dying on three small poultry farms in Hong Kong's outlying New Territories. Microbiologists determined that the 4,500 dead birds in tiny Lau Fau Shan village succumbed to a particularly virulent strain of avian influenza. Described by one leading American virologist as "chicken Ebola," the virus spreads swiftly, attacks all the cells in the infected bird's body and is nearly always fatal.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994
The British colony has long been a thriving free market economy, which has prompted some worries about how the pending takeove by China will impact on one of Asia's largest economies. Under an agreement signed with the British in 1984, the colony in 1997 reverts to Beijing control after 99 years of British rule. THE ECONOMY: With limited national resources, Hong Kong depends on imports for virtually all of its requirements, including raw materials, food and other consumer goods and fuel.
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