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NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The territory's High Court on Friday ruled against more than 5,300 mainland Chinese migrants claiming residency rights in a case testing judicial independence under Beijing's rule. In a written statement, Justice Frank Stock reaffirmed Beijing's power to interpret Hong Kong's mini-constitution, known as the Basic Law, even after Hong Kong courts have made decisions. "There can be no escape from the fact that the interpretation was lawful," he said.
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WORLD
March 10, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists lost a legal battle to block a controversial landfill project in Hong Kong's main harbor when a court ruled Tuesday that the government could proceed with plans to fill in more of the shrinking waterway for roads and buildings.
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NEWS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
China's legislature revised a Hong Kong court ruling on immigration today, issuing a narrowly worded decision with far-reaching implications for the independence of the territory's judiciary. The executive committee of China's National People's Congress ruled that Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeals erred by not consulting the mainland legislature when deciding which Chinese citizens had the right of abode in the territory.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
The territory's High Court on Friday ruled against more than 5,300 mainland Chinese migrants claiming residency rights in a case testing judicial independence under Beijing's rule. In a written statement, Justice Frank Stock reaffirmed Beijing's power to interpret Hong Kong's mini-constitution, known as the Basic Law, even after Hong Kong courts have made decisions. "There can be no escape from the fact that the interpretation was lawful," he said.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | SILVIA CAVALLINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Hong Kong court's landmark rejection of a challenge to the territory's appointed legislature and the laws it passes averted a constitutional crisis Tuesday but opened an era of judicial uncertainty here.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History was made two years ago when the Chinese flag, with its yellow stars and revolutionary-red background, supplanted Britain's imperial Union Jack over this bustling city. Now that symbol of mainland authority lies at the center of a controversy whose main question is one that Americans have been grappling with for years: Should it be lawful for someone to desecrate the national flag?
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not everyone liked the British when this bustling city was a crown colony. But even detractors grudgingly credited her majesty's government with one achievement: establishing a modern, impartial judicial system. Hong Kong citizens, it was said, could count on getting a fair shake from their courts. Now, this bedrock of Hong Kong society is at risk of blowing apart amid a constitutional crisis, critics say, and the planter of the dynamite is none other than Hong Kong's own highest court. On Dec.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
A Hong Kong court has agreed to allow a local company to sue a California Internet provider for copyright violation in a case that could set worldwide precedents on jurisdiction over the network. The lawsuit is probably the first cross-border case involving the Internet. It's the first filed in Hong Kong, lawyers said.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a trade-off that drew praise as well as claims of a sellout, Britain and China broke a four-year stalemate and agreed on setting up a court to safeguard Hong Kong's legal system after China takes over in 1997. Gov. Chris Patten urged Hong Kong's legislature to endorse the agreement or risk a judicial vacuum in 1997. But Martin Lee, leader of the colony's largest political party, charged that the deal was stacked in China's favor.
NEWS
February 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hong Kong's top court took the exceptional step of stating that it has accepted the right of China's parliament to interpret the territory's constitution. China had called on the court to change an earlier ruling on residency that said all children of Hong Kong permanent residents had the right to live in Hong Kong, opening the door to hundreds of thousands of children from mainland China.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not everyone liked the British when this bustling city was a crown colony. But even detractors grudgingly credited her majesty's government with one achievement: establishing a modern, impartial judicial system. Hong Kong citizens, it was said, could count on getting a fair shake from their courts. Now, this bedrock of Hong Kong society is at risk of blowing apart amid a constitutional crisis, critics say, and the planter of the dynamite is none other than Hong Kong's own highest court. On Dec.
NEWS
November 12, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History was made two years ago when the Chinese flag, with its yellow stars and revolutionary-red background, supplanted Britain's imperial Union Jack over this bustling city. Now that symbol of mainland authority lies at the center of a controversy whose main question is one that Americans have been grappling with for years: Should it be lawful for someone to desecrate the national flag?
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
China's legislature revised a Hong Kong court ruling on immigration today, issuing a narrowly worded decision with far-reaching implications for the independence of the territory's judiciary. The executive committee of China's National People's Congress ruled that Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeals erred by not consulting the mainland legislature when deciding which Chinese citizens had the right of abode in the territory.
NEWS
February 27, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hong Kong's top court took the exceptional step of stating that it has accepted the right of China's parliament to interpret the territory's constitution. China had called on the court to change an earlier ruling on residency that said all children of Hong Kong permanent residents had the right to live in Hong Kong, opening the door to hundreds of thousands of children from mainland China.
NEWS
July 30, 1997 | SILVIA CAVALLINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Hong Kong court's landmark rejection of a challenge to the territory's appointed legislature and the laws it passes averted a constitutional crisis Tuesday but opened an era of judicial uncertainty here.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
A Hong Kong court has agreed to allow a local company to sue a California Internet provider for copyright violation in a case that could set worldwide precedents on jurisdiction over the network. The lawsuit is probably the first cross-border case involving the Internet. It's the first filed in Hong Kong, lawyers said.
WORLD
March 10, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists lost a legal battle to block a controversial landfill project in Hong Kong's main harbor when a court ruled Tuesday that the government could proceed with plans to fill in more of the shrinking waterway for roads and buildings.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Western and Southeast Asian nations met Tuesday in Geneva to consider changes in their policy toward Vietnamese "boat people," Hong Kong authorities were coming under increasing fire for the way they determine whether Vietnamese qualify for refugee status.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a trade-off that drew praise as well as claims of a sellout, Britain and China broke a four-year stalemate and agreed on setting up a court to safeguard Hong Kong's legal system after China takes over in 1997. Gov. Chris Patten urged Hong Kong's legislature to endorse the agreement or risk a judicial vacuum in 1997. But Martin Lee, leader of the colony's largest political party, charged that the deal was stacked in China's favor.
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