Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHong Kong Government
IN THE NEWS

Hong Kong Government

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
The Hong Kong government may lend Walt Disney Co. as much as $1 billion and take a majority stake in a new theme park the Burbank-based media and entertainment giant may build in the city, a source said. Hong Kong Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa hopes to announce the deal in his annual policy address Oct. 6, but it could face opposition from lawmakers because it would be the first such government investment in a private enterprise.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - With U.S. prosecutors having filed criminal charges against Edward Snowden, attention turned Saturday to Hong Kong, whose authorities now must decide how to proceed with the case of the self-proclaimed National Security Agency leaker believed to be holed up in the Chinese territory. At a brief news conference Saturday, Hong Kong Police Commissioner Andy Tsang said only that the matter would be handled according to law, and refused to answer a question about whether Snowden was in a police "safe house.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 9, 1998 | From The Associated Press
The Hong Kong government should sell the massive shareholdings it acquired during its controversial market foray last August or risk a loss of confidence in the territory's currency, the currency board's architect told legislators. John Greenwood, president of Invesco Asia Ltd. and one of the key economists who drew up Hong Kong currency's fixed exchange rate system, said it was "neither appropriate nor desirable" for the government to hold so many shares of privately held companies.
WORLD
June 11, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
After a seven-month hunt that drew international attention and involved experts from as far as Australia, authorities announced Thursday that they had captured the territory's most famous fugitive: a 4-foot-6-inch crocodile that became an instant celebrity after it was spotted last fall swimming in a polluted creek.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY and DAVID HOLLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gov. Chris Patten announced Friday that his government is pushing forward with plans for democratic reforms despite fierce opposition from Beijing, which resumes sovereignty over this British colony in 1997. The escalating confrontation over Hong Kong's political future provoked a sharp late-afternoon fall on the Hong Kong stock market. China has immense leverage over Hong Kong's economy.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | From Associated Press
People with one parent from Hong Kong have the right to live in the territory and do not need permission from mainland China to do so, Hong Kong's highest court ruled Friday in a landmark immigration case. The territory's Court of Final Appeal said Beijing was violating the constitutional rights of emigrants with Hong Kong ancestry by insisting on its own screening process. China requires people to gain exit permits before they move out.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not everyone liked the British when this bustling city was a crown colony. But even detractors grudgingly credited her majesty's government with one achievement: establishing a modern, impartial judicial system. Hong Kong citizens, it was said, could count on getting a fair shake from their courts. Now, this bedrock of Hong Kong society is at risk of blowing apart amid a constitutional crisis, critics say, and the planter of the dynamite is none other than Hong Kong's own highest court. On Dec.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China on Friday threatened British authorities in Hong Kong with "confrontation" if they press ahead with plans for democratic reforms before the colony returns to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. "We do not wish to see confrontation because it is detrimental to Hong Kong," Lu Ping, who as director of the Chinese government's Hong Kong-Macao Affairs Office is Beijing's chief spokesman on the colony, said at a news conference.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shipping magnate Tung Chee-hwa, named this week as the man who will lead Hong Kong after Britain hands it back to China, won't start the job until the British governor sails away on June 30. But Tung is not waiting quietly in the wings. His first act as leader-in-waiting was to go to China the day after his appointment to prepare the formation of a shadow legislature that will operate even before the hand-over.
WORLD
March 18, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
It's been a tough 12 months for the government of Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa. Hong Kong's leadership has fought disease, faced mass protests and watched its popularity tumble. And then there is the great crocodile caper.
WORLD
May 22, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
The abrupt resignations of three popular radio talk-show hosts in recent weeks amid accusations of political intimidation have alarmed human rights activists, who view the incidents as part of a broader mood of intolerance in this former British colony.
WORLD
March 18, 2004 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
It's been a tough 12 months for the government of Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa. Hong Kong's leadership has fought disease, faced mass protests and watched its popularity tumble. And then there is the great crocodile caper.
WORLD
September 5, 2003 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa today announced that the government would withdraw a controversial anti-subversion bill that pro-democracy political forces in the territory bitterly opposed as a threat to freedom of speech. Tung made his announcement at a hastily arranged midday news conference, stating that he decided to withdraw the bill because "the Hong Kong community continues to have some doubts and concerns."
WORLD
July 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
A top pro-Beijing lawmaker Thursday asked the Hong Kong government to water down an anti-subversion bill that prompted a protest by an estimated 350,000 people this week. "Since people still have existing doubts and this has caused such a great controversy, can the government consider responding to people's worries?" asked Jasper Tsang, chairman of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment of Hong Kong.
NEWS
April 3, 2002 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the elderly woman told her tale, tears rolled down her cheeks and spilled onto the patterns of her wrinkled silk blouse. Through the hurt, 72-year-old Tse Kam-ying explained how her only son had departed for mainland China two days earlier under a deportation order, leaving her bewildered and alone except for one gnawing fear: that she will die at home and no one will know. "I have no one now," she stammered. "I don't know how the government can be so cruel."
NEWS
July 1, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The people of Hong Kong mark the fourth anniversary of their return to Chinese sovereignty today amid an uneasy sense that the biggest threat to their political autonomy may not be from Beijing but from within the territory. Government critics--and there are many--claim that the region's leadership is ill-advised, overly cautious and lacking in vision.
NEWS
June 30, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The voice on the answering machine was one of Italy's best-known television correspondents. She was doing some advance work in preparation for this week's visit to cover the final chapter of British colonial rule in Asia. "Can you put me in touch with Suzie Wong? I hear she's a key figure in Hong Kong," she asked, apparently unaware that the legendary bar hostess was a Hollywood fantasy of East meeting West.
NEWS
September 10, 1994 | Reuters
A department store being demolished in Hong Kong collapsed onto a crowded sidewalk Friday, killing five people, Hong Kong government radio reported. The building, a former Wing On department store on Nathan Road in Kowloon district, fell on passing pedestrians and traffic.
NEWS
May 19, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hong Kong government Friday ordered the immediate slaughter of 1.2 million chickens--virtually the territory's entire poultry population--in a drastic attempt to stamp out a killer virus that officials fear could eventually affect humans. "Having consulted experts . . .
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Financial Secretary Donald Tsang was handed the No. 2 job in Hong Kong's government Thursday in the first major leadership reshuffle since the territory was handed back to China 3 1/2 years ago. Tsang's appointment to the post of chief secretary follows last month's sudden announcement that Anson Chan--an outspoken defender of democratic values--planned to retire well before her term was to expire. Antony Leung, 49, the head of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.'
Los Angeles Times Articles
|