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NEWS
August 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A mainland Chinese migrant and a Hong Kong immigration officer died of injuries suffered in a blaze set last week in a confrontation at Hong Kong's immigration headquarters. They were among 50 people hurt when a group of migrants doused the immigration office with flammable liquid and torched it, setting off an explosion and fire as a bitter battle over residency rights in the Chinese territory took its most violent turn yet.
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NEWS
August 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A mainland Chinese migrant and a Hong Kong immigration officer died of injuries suffered in a blaze set last week in a confrontation at Hong Kong's immigration headquarters. They were among 50 people hurt when a group of migrants doused the immigration office with flammable liquid and torched it, setting off an explosion and fire as a bitter battle over residency rights in the Chinese territory took its most violent turn yet.
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NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From Reuters
A senior adviser to the Hong Kong government warned today of grave consequences if more than 3 million Hong Kong people were denied the right to settle in Britain after the colony reverts to Chinese rule in 1997. "It would be very difficult for the British administration to run this place (if the) population is resentful of being deprived of the one thing that would give them confidence," Dame Lydia Dunn, senior member of the Executive Council, which advises Hong Kong's governor, told a news conference.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
Migrants from mainland China can stay in Hong Kong while they fight a ruling that requires them to go home and await Hong Kong's permission to establish residency, a trial court ruled Monday. Eighteen people have filed a lawsuit saying that they should be allowed to stay in the territory after its highest court ruled last month that anyone with at least one Hong Kong parent has the right to live here.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
Migrants from mainland China can stay in Hong Kong while they fight a ruling that requires them to go home and await Hong Kong's permission to establish residency, a trial court ruled Monday. Eighteen people have filed a lawsuit saying that they should be allowed to stay in the territory after its highest court ruled last month that anyone with at least one Hong Kong parent has the right to live here.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Reuters
Immigration authorities released prominent U.S.-based Chinese dissident Wang Bingzhang early today, a Hong Kong-based human rights group said. "This morning at 1 a.m., Wang was released by the Hong Kong immigration department and Wang is now in Macao," said Frank Lu of the Information Center of Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China. Wang intended to leave Macao today for Taiwan, Lu said.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amnesty International, a London-based human rights organization, said Monday there are "critical shortcomings" in the way Hong Kong officials determine whether Vietnamese "boat people" qualify as political refugees. It called on the authorities to halt further forced repatriation of "boat people" to Vietnam until the situation is remedied.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While millions of people in China may want to live in prospering Hong Kong, Lam Mei-cheng, a housewife from nearby Guangdong province, had three compelling reasons to sneak across the border: Her husband and two of her children are here. But under the strict immigration laws of Hong Kong and China, Lam had been separated from her husband for more than half of their 11-year marriage. They have a total of four children but had been apart even during the births of some of them.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amy Yeung made a reservation months ago to fly here on June 20. The Alhambra real estate agent is one of nearly 400,000 people expected to descend on this tiny British colony in the weeks before it reverts to Chinese control. The main reason: Yeung and other Hong Kong expatriates fear that only by being on the island at the time of the June 30 hand-over can they be assured of maintaining their right to live in their homeland.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
On the previous night, he had helped to nab an oyster boat from the Chinese province of Fujian. It was carrying eight children below the age of 13, all of them tired and hungry. Now, as darkness approached for another evening's patrol in his speedy water-jet craft, Marine Police Inspector Lee Sinleung of the Royal Hong Kong Police was for a few brief moments in a somber mood.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Elsie Leung, Hong Kong's justice secretary, said Chinese officials she had met in Beijing told her that a controversial court ruling on immigration violated the territory's Basic Law and should be rectified. China has challenged the court ruling that opens the door to tens of thousands of potential immigrants from the mainland. Outraged Hong Kong politicians have accused Beijing of meddling.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting the stage for a constitutional crisis that will test the limits of Hong Kong's judicial independence, a senior Chinese Cabinet official Monday attacked a ruling by the territory's highest court granting the right of abode to thousands of mainland-born children whose parents live in Hong Kong. "The decision of the Hong Kong court was a mistake and against the Basic Law," Zhao Qizheng, director of the State Council Information Office, told reporters attending a reception in Beijing.
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | From Associated Press
People with one parent from Hong Kong have the right to live in the territory and do not need permission from mainland China to do so, Hong Kong's highest court ruled Friday in a landmark immigration case. The territory's Court of Final Appeal said Beijing was violating the constitutional rights of emigrants with Hong Kong ancestry by insisting on its own screening process. China requires people to gain exit permits before they move out.
NEWS
March 21, 1998 | From Reuters
Immigration authorities released prominent U.S.-based Chinese dissident Wang Bingzhang early today, a Hong Kong-based human rights group said. "This morning at 1 a.m., Wang was released by the Hong Kong immigration department and Wang is now in Macao," said Frank Lu of the Information Center of Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China. Wang intended to leave Macao today for Taiwan, Lu said.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While millions of people in China may want to live in prospering Hong Kong, Lam Mei-cheng, a housewife from nearby Guangdong province, had three compelling reasons to sneak across the border: Her husband and two of her children are here. But under the strict immigration laws of Hong Kong and China, Lam had been separated from her husband for more than half of their 11-year marriage. They have a total of four children but had been apart even during the births of some of them.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The top U.S. immigration officer in Hong Kong has been suspended and placed under investigation less than a year after his predecessor was caught smuggling forged passports into the colony, a U.S. official said. James DeBates, acting chief of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, was placed on administrative leave with pay pending an inquiry by the agency, U.S. Consulate spokeswoman Norma Harris said. Harris said she had no further information on the investigation.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite strong objections from the United States, the British territory of Hong Kong early today deported to Hanoi 51 Vietnamese, most of them children, who came here seeking political asylum in the West but were later deemed to be illegal immigrants. The expulsions marked the first time since the fall of Saigon to the Communists nearly 15 years ago that large numbers of Vietnamese have been forcibly repatriated to their homeland.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The top U.S. immigration officer in Hong Kong has been suspended and placed under investigation less than a year after his predecessor was caught smuggling forged passports into the colony, a U.S. official said. James DeBates, acting chief of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, was placed on administrative leave with pay pending an inquiry by the agency, U.S. Consulate spokeswoman Norma Harris said. Harris said she had no further information on the investigation.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amy Yeung made a reservation months ago to fly here on June 20. The Alhambra real estate agent is one of nearly 400,000 people expected to descend on this tiny British colony in the weeks before it reverts to Chinese control. The main reason: Yeung and other Hong Kong expatriates fear that only by being on the island at the time of the June 30 hand-over can they be assured of maintaining their right to live in their homeland.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1992 | From Reuters
The poor North American economy is forcing hundreds of Hong Kong immigrants to leave their families and return to the booming British colony to work, Chinese business leaders here say. They said that about 20% of Hong Kong residents who have emigrated to Canada in the past five years have gone back to Asia or become "astronauts," flying between the two countries. "The trend is to go back there.
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