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BUSINESS
March 21, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the old Kai Tak International Airport here, speeding sports cars bear down on four teenagers standing at one end of the broad concrete runway that juts into Victoria Harbor. One teen, Nicholas Tse, flashes a defiant, fearless sneer at the approaching Ferraris, which brake to a stop just short of the unflinching youths. Hong Kong's movie studios, desperate to find a new star to save their struggling industry, are hoping audiences will come to know and love that sneer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore
HONG KONG - When Mabel Cheung, one of this city's leading directors, shot her historical-political drama "The Soong Sisters" in China in the mid-1990s, the nature of the exchange for the co-production was simple: Beijing provided inexpensive manpower, and professionals from the British colony's highly developed movie industry provided the expertise. Hong Kong cinema, after all, had been enjoying a golden age for close to two decades - celebrated directors such as John Woo and Wong Kar-wai had helped the city's filmmakers garner a global fan base.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Joyce Man, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Hong Kong - Times were good in the 1970s and '80s for Hong Kong comics - so good that one publisher was listed on the stock exchange and a newspaper dedicated to the genre published daily for two years. They were, in the words of Tony Wong, the creator of the Oriental Heroes action series whom fans, artists and scholars have dubbed the territory's godfather of comics, "the golden years. " In recent years, comics publishers here in one of the world's largest markets for the genre have slimmed down.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994
The British colony has long been a thriving free market economy, which has prompted some worries about how the pending takeove by China will impact on one of Asia's largest economies. Under an agreement signed with the British in 1984, the colony in 1997 reverts to Beijing control after 99 years of British rule. THE ECONOMY: With limited national resources, Hong Kong depends on imports for virtually all of its requirements, including raw materials, food and other consumer goods and fuel.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six years ago, Chen Zhanhong the tailor made eight to 10 pieces of clothing a day as he pedaled a foot-powered sewing machine on the sidewalk. He earned $100 a month. Today, Chen, 35, rules over five factories, four shops and 500 employees, with sales last year of $2 million. He casually predicts that by the end of this decade, sales for One Plus One Clothes-Making Ltd. will reach $100 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Joyce Man, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Hong Kong - Times were good in the 1970s and '80s for Hong Kong comics - so good that one publisher was listed on the stock exchange and a newspaper dedicated to the genre published daily for two years. They were, in the words of Tony Wong, the creator of the Oriental Heroes action series whom fans, artists and scholars have dubbed the territory's godfather of comics, "the golden years. " In recent years, comics publishers here in one of the world's largest markets for the genre have slimmed down.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore
HONG KONG - When Mabel Cheung, one of this city's leading directors, shot her historical-political drama "The Soong Sisters" in China in the mid-1990s, the nature of the exchange for the co-production was simple: Beijing provided inexpensive manpower, and professionals from the British colony's highly developed movie industry provided the expertise. Hong Kong cinema, after all, had been enjoying a golden age for close to two decades - celebrated directors such as John Woo and Wong Kar-wai had helped the city's filmmakers garner a global fan base.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
This bustling port's poor, out-of-the-way Sham Shui Po district is an unlikely site for a tourist attraction. Teeming tenements line fetid streets. A shirtless youth and a wriggling snake star in a grotesque street corner dance. Yet each day, hundreds of visitors brave the squalor in search of one of Hong Kong's biggest--and most illicit--bargains. They do not come to see the snake man. They come to see the pirates.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | SORINA DIACONESCU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only a year ago, the world's fifth-largest filmmaking center languished in the wreckage of Asia's 1997 financial crisis, but grabbing the tail of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"--and other Asian productions--the Hong Kong film industry is poised for recovery. European films nabbed more honors at this year's Cannes International Film Festival, but outside the official competition it was clear that Hong Kong filmmakers were on a roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | SORINA DIACONESCU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Only a year ago, the world's fifth-largest filmmaking center languished in the wreckage of Asia's 1997 financial crisis, but grabbing the tail of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"--and other Asian productions--the Hong Kong film industry is poised for recovery. European films nabbed more honors at this year's Cannes International Film Festival, but outside the official competition it was clear that Hong Kong filmmakers were on a roll.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the old Kai Tak International Airport here, speeding sports cars bear down on four teenagers standing at one end of the broad concrete runway that juts into Victoria Harbor. One teen, Nicholas Tse, flashes a defiant, fearless sneer at the approaching Ferraris, which brake to a stop just short of the unflinching youths. Hong Kong's movie studios, desperate to find a new star to save their struggling industry, are hoping audiences will come to know and love that sneer.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994
The British colony has long been a thriving free market economy, which has prompted some worries about how the pending takeove by China will impact on one of Asia's largest economies. Under an agreement signed with the British in 1984, the colony in 1997 reverts to Beijing control after 99 years of British rule. THE ECONOMY: With limited national resources, Hong Kong depends on imports for virtually all of its requirements, including raw materials, food and other consumer goods and fuel.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY and SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six years ago, Chen Zhanhong the tailor made eight to 10 pieces of clothing a day as he pedaled a foot-powered sewing machine on the sidewalk. He earned $100 a month. Today, Chen, 35, rules over five factories, four shops and 500 employees, with sales last year of $2 million. He casually predicts that by the end of this decade, sales for One Plus One Clothes-Making Ltd. will reach $100 million.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
This bustling port's poor, out-of-the-way Sham Shui Po district is an unlikely site for a tourist attraction. Teeming tenements line fetid streets. A shirtless youth and a wriggling snake star in a grotesque street corner dance. Yet each day, hundreds of visitors brave the squalor in search of one of Hong Kong's biggest--and most illicit--bargains. They do not come to see the snake man. They come to see the pirates.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1997
Will Hong Kong's movie industry thrive or be stifled when China assumes control July 1? * En Vogue, the most influential girl group of the '90s, is back--this time as a trio. * Why is Dad portrayed as a distant, dysfunctional caricature in "family" films? * How original are new TV shows?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By John Horn
China's film and television business generated revenue of $15.5 billion, or 100 billion yuan in local currency, and supported more than 900,000 jobs in 2011, according to a new study by the Motion Picture Assn. and the China Film Distributors and Exhibitors Assn. The report did not offer comparable figures for 2010, but said film and TV revenues have grown 85% in non-inflation-adjusted sales from 2006. The figures underscore the growth of the Chinese market, which within a few years is expected to pass the United States as the world's No. 1 box-office territory.
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