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NEWS
July 3, 2000
Re "Are We Seeing the Tail End of the Bumper Sticker Craze?" (June 25), I've always wondered why people would want to emblazon the rear-ends of their cars with their most profound political and ethical convictions or their most sacred beliefs, only to have them befouled by exhaust fumes and road grime. It seems somehow to trivialize the subjects they seek to affirm. Perhaps, in a quest for safe anonymity, bumper stickers have been eschewed as too attention getting. After all, many fear even to make eye contact with other L.A. drivers lest they precipitate a shootout.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Amy Poehler showed why she and Tina Fey were back again to host the 71st Golden Globe Awards with a simple switch of an “o” and an “a.” “Tam Honks” became an instant Twitter trend after a deliberate slip of the tongue from “Parks and Recreation” actress Poehler. She congratulated Chiwetel Ejiofer and Lupita Nyong'o for their awards nominations without skipping a beat,  but she had some fun with Tom Hanks who received praise for his roles in “Captain Phillips” and “Saving Mr. Banks.” That's when Poehler uttered the possible new nickname for the veteran actor, “Tam Honks.” Golden Globes 2014: Full coverage | Show highlights | Quotes from the stars | Top winners/nominees | Red carpet arrivals | Complete list | Main story | Nominee reactions Hanks took it all in stride with a chuckle and a look of confusion.
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OPINION
April 10, 2004
I recently spent eight days in Southern California, mostly in Los Angeles, visiting friends. My overwhelming impression of my visit is: Can the Los Angeles drivers move to where I live? I drove nearly 900 miles in all kinds of traffic. I encountered only two drivers who "behaved badly": a lady in Pasadena who was pulling out of a parking spot and would have hit me if I hadn't anticipated her, and a man in a four-wheel-drive truck on the road to the Ocotillo Wells RV area who was anxious to get on the highway and pulled out too close to me. Otherwise, I encountered drivers who maintained a steady flow, made room if another driver signaled to change lanes, didn't tailgate, didn't honk their horns for frivolous reasons, didn't weave in and out of traffic and seemed to obey virtually all the traffic laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2013 | By Emily Foxhall
When Nick Silverman honked in support of protesters who were upset over the George Zimmerman verdict, they weren't the only ones to take note Sunday night. Unaware of the larger protests, Silverman thought he might show some support when he saw a group of teenagers wearing hoodies and holding signs near La Cienega and Pico boulevards about 7 p.m. Sunday. Silverman honked, stuck his arm out the window and waved  - then he noticed red and blue lights in his rear-view mirror.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1999
May I suggest one way to protest speed bumps is to honk your horn every time you go over one. A "speed table" only means you get to honk longer. GERALD MARANTZ Chatsworth
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1985
I now proudly display the following sign in my car window: "Child Carries No Cash" My kids love it! P.S. Honk if you think my sign's pretentious. PAUL ZWART Rosemead
OPINION
March 30, 2004
Re "No. 1 Rule of the Road -- Just Let 'em Honk," Commentary, March 28: Mark Cloud has it right about the problem of the concerned driver going 50 miles per hour in a residential area. I've seen him many times, and no matter how much I honk the horn, he won't move over and let me pass. James T. Humberd La Quinta
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989
In response to "Big Boy Bowing Out: Original Glendale Diner Serves Its Last Burger After 51 Years," Metro, Oct. 17: During the 1950s Bob's was a large drive-in restaurant popular with young people as a hang-out "American Graffiti" style. About 1958, a novelty song was frequently played on the radio about a Nash Rambler behind a Cadillac; much horn honking was integrated into the music. The young people, one night, all listening to the same station on their car radios, proceeded to honk their horns in collective unison.
OPINION
March 8, 1998
Ending the gas leaf blower trauma was a great start. Now, let's go after the rest of the noisemakers. Start with the power lawn mowers, which generate about as much noise as the blowers, then turn to the construction teams that start their banging at the crack of dawn, and then the obnoxious garbage trucks, which collect at 6 a.m. on weekends. After we win those battles, I want to tackle the city, which sends out its power tree-trimming teams to churn out incredible headaches, those irritating police helicopters that buzz seemingly 10 feet above my roof and finally, those agonizing car alarms, especially the ones that repeatedly honk, honk, honk, and the ones that play a series of various sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1995
For the second time, Don Heckman has referred to Don Byas as a "honking, screeching" saxophone player (Jazz Spotlight, April 16). I have been a professional saxophone player for over 35 years, and have a collection of 287 of Byas' recordings (plus a few that I haven't catalogued yet) that spans 1938-68. They include studio recordings and live performances. There is not one screech or honk among them, but rather an extraordinarily beautiful sound and performances of consistently elegant taste, vivid imagination, a comprehensive knowledge of harmony, and technique unrivaled by anyone but Johnny Griffin, who, incidentally, calls Byas the "Art Tatum of the saxophone."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2012
Von Freeman was revered as a tenor saxophonist but was never a major star, worshiped by critics but perpetually strapped for cash. He seemed to purposely avoid commercial success. When trumpeter Miles Davis phoned Freeman in the 1950s looking for a replacement for John Coltrane, Freeman made a typical move - he never returned the call. His refusal to leave his native Chicago during most of his career cost him incalculable fame and fortune but also enabled him to create a body of distinctive and innovative work.
WORLD
March 26, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Rebels fighting the regime of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi have retaken the strategic city of Ajdabiya in the country's east, officials in the capital acknowledged. A foreign ministry official told reporters that armed forces loyal to Kadafi, under air assault by an international Western-led coalition including the United States, have been forced to retreat from the coastal city, which controls the road to the rebel-held stronghold of Benghazi as well as the desert road to the country's eastern border.
WORLD
March 5, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
The Libyan jet fighter circled once, twice, and then dipped, low and ominous. "Scatter! Scatter!" a rebel commander screamed. On a windswept highway here on the new front line in the ever-shifting war in Libya's east, rebel gunmen raced for cover behind boulders the color of sand. Several antiaircraft guns burst to life, sending bright red rounds streaking toward the sky. They exploded in black puffs above the desert Saturday afternoon. Then the plane was gone, and the frenzied, all-day celebration of the rebel victory over pro-government forces the night before resumed.
WORLD
February 13, 2011 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Egyptian army moved into Tahrir Square on Sunday, tearing down tents and opening the artery to traffic nearly three weeks after the start of the protests that brought an end to the 30-year reign of Hosni Mubarak. The dozens of soldiers in olive fatigues and red berets surrounded the one remaining stage for protesters, while cars honked and drove around the city hub for the first time since Jan. 25, when people erupted in rage against Mubarak. It was a sign of the military's determination to restore normalcy to the nation's capital.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2010 | By Kerry Luft, Tribune Washington Bureau
Trevor Shannahan lifts his custom-designed, hand-tuned, glittering blue instrument to his lips and plays the soundtrack to life on Maryland's Eastern Shore. " HA-RONK! " he begins. " HA-RONK! " Shannahan sways like a jazz trumpeter taking a solo. He crouches, bends at the waist, and turns to and fro, his hands fluttering as he blows a cacophony of honks, moans, purrs and growls. Close your eyes, and he sounds just like a flock of Canada geese. He is a one-man gaggle, and a young man with a dream.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | Michael J. Crumb
Honk if you love pedestrians. In response to several instances in which pedestrians were struck by buses -- including one this week -- Des Moines is temporarily requiring bus drivers to honk every time they make a turn. And since every accident happened when the buses were turning left, drivers now follow routes that involve only right turns in the city's downtown. Seven people have been struck by buses in the last two years, including two in July, although none died. The number may seem small compared with the city's population of about 200,000, but Des Moines transit officials are in the process of settling a lawsuit of more than $2 million involving a pedestrian who was struck in 2007.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001
Diane Broughton's letter (Aug. 4) is more revealing than she perhaps intended. The fact of the matter is, here on the lower I-5, our cops (CHP) give the "maniac" U.S. truckers a very generous pass. It is a rare trucker who obeys the posted (for them) 55-mph speed limit; the miscreants will also ride your bumper, flash headlights, honk horns and, on occasion, will even go around on the left even though one is moving at the speed limit for autos. When there is the inevitable spectacular crash, most, including the media reporting, treat it as an aberration.
NEWS
August 2, 2009 | Michael J. Crumb
Honk if you love pedestrians. In response to several instances in which pedestrians were struck by buses -- including one this week -- Des Moines is temporarily requiring bus drivers to honk every time they make a turn. And since every accident happened when the buses were turning left, drivers now follow routes that involve only right turns in the city's downtown. Seven people have been struck by buses in the last two years, including two in July, although none died. The number may seem small compared with the city's population of about 200,000, but Des Moines transit officials are in the process of settling a lawsuit of more than $2 million involving a pedestrian who was struck in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2009 | Sharon Mizota
Llyn Foulkes marches to the beat of his own drum -- and bass, xylophone, car horn and cowbell. The idiosyncratic painter, whose works are featured in "Nine Lives," is also an accomplished musician. And his instrument of choice is, well, all of them. Foulkes plays a homemade contraption called the Machine, a dense, wraparound nest of scavenged and invented instruments whose crowning glory is a clump of old-fashioned car and bicycle horns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2009 | Bob Pool
This is a goose that gets more than one gander in Boyle Heights. Visitors to Hollenbeck Park stop and stare when they see the huge white bird swim across the park's lake, climb into Jesus Hernandez's arms and give him a love peck. They watch in amazement as Hernandez tosses the goose back into the water and it ducks its head gleefully beneath the surface. Then it shakes off the drops and paddles back to the shore for another toss.
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