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NEWS
October 18, 2000 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A friend of mine believes the world is coming to an end. The civilized world, anyway. He lives and works in an apartment on a suburban street where many other people live and work in apartments. Popular people. He knows they are popular because of the horns. The horns honked by people in cars who want the people in the apartments to know they are there. And ready to go. So get a move on, already.
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NEWS
July 3, 2000
Re "Are We Seeing the Tail End of the Bumper Sticker Craze?" (June 25), I've always wondered why people would want to emblazon the rear-ends of their cars with their most profound political and ethical convictions or their most sacred beliefs, only to have them befouled by exhaust fumes and road grime. It seems somehow to trivialize the subjects they seek to affirm. Perhaps, in a quest for safe anonymity, bumper stickers have been eschewed as too attention getting. After all, many fear even to make eye contact with other L.A. drivers lest they precipitate a shootout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | MATT SURMAN and GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The buzz of chain saws competed with the battle cry, "save our trees, save our trees,' on Thursday, as workers cut down two of three aged oaks, the focus of fierce preservation protests. Under an occasional snow of sawdust from the trees in Libbey Park, about a dozen sheriff's deputies, some on horseback, some wearing riot helmets, stood guard amid a crowd of more than 100 protesters and spectators.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Peter Ladefoged is in love with what you say. Not the meaning of your words. But the eloquent music you make when you speak. The 73-year-old UCLA linguist has spent a lifetime gathering all the distinct sounds of the world's languages, from the jungles of New Guinea, the bush of Africa, and the mountains of Tibet and Nepal. To hear the genial professor honk, click, choke, whistle, smack, rumble and burble is to hear every instrument in the orchestra of human speech.
NEWS
September 6, 1999 | GEORGE SKELTON
You may have pulled up to a gas pump this Labor Day weekend, winced at the racing price meter, then driven off into crawling traffic. Maybe even bounced through a few jarring ruts. The bad news is that it'll get worse Tuesday. Not only do the rush hours return, but most schools reopen. There'll be the annual late-summer shock of little cherubs and their teachers clogging the highways.
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | KASTLE WASERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the regular assortment of greased-up, hot-rod guys and '50s pinup-style dames, the word about this year's annual Blessing of the Cars was "big." Glendale's Verdugo Park just couldn't hold the vast collection of pre-1967 cars at Saturday's event.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | MARTIN MILLER
You could really send someone around the bend with a new remote control device called the Valet CarCom. It's the kind of thing Batman, or maybe the Joker, would have. The device allows you to control many of your car's major functions by telephone. By dialing an 800 number and entering the correct security codes, you can pop the trunk, disable the starter, unlock the doors, turn on the heater, and honk the horn, if you like.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1998 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Really Ugly Bread, $1.50," read a sign in the display case. The bread had a handsome red-orange tone, presumably from tomato juice in the dough, but it was indeed a homely, lumpy runt of a loaf, like a French roll having a disastrous hair day. I thought nothing of it; I was there to get a goat cheese, spinach and roasted pepper sandwich. But the merry cashier with the pierced nose said, "All we've got right now is the ugly bread."
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