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BUSINESS
September 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gannett to Buy Honolulu Advertiser: Gannett Co. said it is buying the morning paper for $250 million from Persis Corp., whose chief executive, 71-year-old Thurston Twigg-Smith, decided to sell because none of about 50 stockholders, many of them relatives, wanted to follow him in the business. Gannett must sell the afternoon Honolulu Star-Bulletin to comply with antitrust laws barring it from owning both of the city's daily newspapers.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ownership Change of Honolulu Newspapers: Gannett Co. completed its purchase of The Honolulu Advertiser and its sale of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, the company said. Gannett announced last Sept. 2 it would buy the Advertiser, a morning newspaper with a circulation of 105,000. On Jan. 7, it said it had found a buyer for the Star-Bulletin, which has 88,000 readers and is published in the afternoon. The Justice Department said in midweek that it would not challenge the plan.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ownership Change of Honolulu Newspapers: Gannett Co. completed its purchase of The Honolulu Advertiser and its sale of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, the company said. Gannett announced last Sept. 2 it would buy the Advertiser, a morning newspaper with a circulation of 105,000. On Jan. 7, it said it had found a buyer for the Star-Bulletin, which has 88,000 readers and is published in the afternoon. The Justice Department said in midweek that it would not challenge the plan.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gannett to Buy Honolulu Advertiser: Gannett Co. said it is buying the morning paper for $250 million from Persis Corp., whose chief executive, 71-year-old Thurston Twigg-Smith, decided to sell because none of about 50 stockholders, many of them relatives, wanted to follow him in the business. Gannett must sell the afternoon Honolulu Star-Bulletin to comply with antitrust laws barring it from owning both of the city's daily newspapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN and PATTI VYZRALEK, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Los Angeles artists Billy Al Bengston, Tony Berlant, Chuck Arnoldi joined top artists and art dealers from New York, Chicago, San Francisco and elsewhere in Honolulu over the weekend for the opening of Hawaii's first contemporary art museum. With a view of Diamond Head and downtown Waikiki, the Contemporary Museum, a 12,000-square-foot restored 1920s estate, will house 1,000 artworks of 500 artists. Museum director Fritz Frauchiger, former chief of L.A.'
BUSINESS
May 4, 2011 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
If you're fed up with high gasoline prices, you might want to avoid the roads less traveled. In the remote town of Hana on the Hawaiian island of Maui, you'll find vistas of natural beauty and what may be the nation's most expensive regular-grade gasoline at $6.03 a gallon. You also might skip the scenic drive along Highway 190 in Death Valley, which will lead you to the Furnace Creek Resort, where regular was selling for $5.75 a gallon Tuesday. "It's a resort. They charge what they want," said Raymond, a fellow who declined to give his last name and said he answers the phone at the Furnace Creek Chevron now and then.
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